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COL. GEORGE WASHINGTON FLOWERS 
MEMORIAL COLLECTION 




TRINITY COLLEGE LIBRARY 
DURHAM, N.C. 



The Gift of _ 



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Dan Wl**), - J<2, /$£! 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES 



INCLUDING A BRIEF TREATISE ON THE SUBJECT OF DEACONS, THEIR 
DUTIES, ETC., WITH SOME PERSONAL MENTION 
OF THESE OFFICERS; 



BRIEF SKETCHES OF A FEW OF OUR TALENTED AND SPIRITUALLY- 
MINDED SISTERS AND "MOTHERS IN ISRAEL" 
TOGETHER WITH AN 



APPENDIX 

OF MUCH USEFUL INFORMATION AND 
MANY ILLUSTRATIONS 



EDITED BY 



R. H. PITTMAN 



PUBLISHER ELECTROTYPES, 

HERALD PUBLISHING CO. INDIANA ELECTROTYPE CO. 

ANDERSON, IND. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1909, by R. H. Pittman, in 
the office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C. 



PREFACE. 



SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

PREFACE 





When the legal dispensation with its types and shadows, its tabernacle and 
temple ceremonies, had served the purpose for which God had ordained them, viz, 
for the teaching and leading and pointing His chosen people to Jesus as the 
anti-type of all types — the substance of all shadows, it was then that old things — 
under the law — passed away, and all things — under the gospel — became new. 
The Law being fulfilled in Christ its ceremonies were abolished and its shadows 
became more defined as the Son of Righteousness arose with healing in His 
wing, and in their place was established the church with its simple, spiritual 
worship. And among the gifts our Divine Saviour obtained for His church when 
He ascended on high, and which are to be perpetuated till the completion of her 
members and the perfect unity of the body, is that of faithful pastors. 

To treat of these pastors — those of our day and and in our own country — is 
the chief object of this book. While the stamp of imperfection is found upon each 
and none are more free to admit it than themselves, yet, it is doubted if a more 
worthy, faithful and self-sacrificing body of men could be found. Without any 
guarantee from men of a salary or maintenance, they, like the Primitive preach- 
ers, go forward in the discharge of the duties of their high calling as they see 
it, walking by faith and depending upon Him who does all His pleasure in the 
army of Heaven and among the inhabitants of earth, and who has promised to 
be with them alway, even unto the end. And as a body of believers, bearing a 
denominational name, they stand entirely alone in defense of this faith and 
practice of the Apostolic Church. No other denomination and perhaps all others 
combined, can show as many pastors of the apostolic order and "missionaries" 
laboring on the Bible plan, as the Primitive or Old School Baptist, — Men who 
are not hired to preach, nor who can be hired to quit preaching, but whose serv- 
ice in the Master's vineyard is a labor of love freely offered upon the altar of 
gratitude for the glory of God and the benefit of men. 

God calls such into his service. He must or none would go. The natural 
mind runs not in that direction, and it is as true today as it has ever been that 
"No man taketh this honor unto himself, but he that is called of God, as was 
Aaron." The true undershepherd is chosen and called. Christ said to His 
servants, "Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you, and ordained you, 
that ye should go and bring forth fruit." The apostles, the prophets, evangelists, 
pastors and teachers are all gifts from the Lord— not for the eternal salvation 
of sinners but for "the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry for 
the edifying of the body of Christ." 

And as their calling is not from men neither do they get their qualifications 
from men. Evidently it is true, if we accept the Bible as authority on the subject, 
that all the diplomas from all theological seminaries cannot confer upon one the 
gift of preaching. Nor will the application of high sounding titles such as "Rev.," 
"Rt. Rev.," "D. D.," and "LL. D." be of any assistance in the sacred work. In 
the language of Mr. Spurgeon, "the title D. D. may mean Doctor of Damnation." 
At any rate the world no more needs a literary ministry than it needed a literary 
Christ. The truthfulness of this statement is evidenced by the fact that Christ 
chose none of His Apostles, with the single exception of Paul, from the ranks oi 
the learned, nor did he train to literary authorship nor give them one single 
express command to labor in that way. 



180582 



8 PREFACE. 

The reply of Elder P. D. Gold, of North Carolina, to Wm. Hooper, D. D., LL. D. 
a prominent New School Baptist, so fully sets forth the view of our people on 
the question of an educated ministry that the editor quotes from it as follows: 

"You say, Were there not schools of the prophets? Well, it seems to me 
that the prophets can give as sensible an account of their call as any one can give 
for them. Do any of them ever tell us that they were called out of any school, 
or ever were called to go to any such a place? They spake as they were moved 
by the Holy Ghost. But it is asked. Were not the disciples with Jesus three 
years before they began to preach? If they are not with Him all their lives, 
what is their preaching worth? Are the schools in the place of Jesus, or is He 
to be found by going to them? And is that the way to get to Christ? But you 
say, Will not human learning aid man in preaching the gospel — will it not give 
him words and power over men's minds, and enable him to preach the gospel 
in a more attractive form? I am free to admit the value of human learning in 
man's earthly affairs, and heartily commend its acquisition in that sense. But 
what does inspiration say about spiritual things and how they are spoken? 
'Which things also we speak, not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth, 
but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual.' 
When the Lord calls a learned man (though He does not call many), that man 
glories in becoming a fool that he may win Christ. Human learning makes no 
part of the new man, and the saint who has human learning is just as weak and 
dependent on God for his crumb as any other, and all are fed with the same kind 
of food. But say you, After one is certainly called to preach, cannot the schools 
polish him, and give him more influence over men, and enable him better to 
command their respect, by keeping pace with human learning? Tell me, from 
Scripture, where one ever tried it, or where it was ever authorized. How much 
can frail man add to God's gift? How much pride do you think is necessary to 
influence man to presume such a task? Do not the Scriptures pointedly forbid 
the employment of worldly weapons in building up Christ's kingdom? Is the 
minister of Christ to suit his message to proud man's taste? 'We speak wisdom 
to them that are perfect, but not wisdom to this world.' It seems to me that 
the Scriptures make some allusions to theological schools, though in the way of 
alarm. 'But the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine, but 
after their own lusts will heap to themselves teachers having itching ears.' 
Much as the Bible is talked of, its doctrine is not endured; but this progressive 
age calls for theological schools that shall enlighten men to preach doctrines 
suitable to men's lusts. Men who have devoted so much time and labor in the 
preparation for the ministry, are worthy of positions of influence and profit. 
The teachers come down from these schools dosed with a sort of preparation 
from dead men's brains that will make them sick enough if God should ever 
teach them where their dependence lies. How do these schools heap up teachers? 
They furnish opportunities for obtaining an education, open the way to positions 
of honor and reward, so that there is but little trouble attending the road, and 
if money enough could be commanded it would be difficult to tell how many 
would be heaped up; but they shall have itching ears, and shall turn away their 
ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables. The doctrines and fables of 
men are accepted. Andrew Puller becomes' a wonderful standard. He takes 
repentance and faith out of the covenant of grace, and puts them under the law, 
in the sense that he makes them man's duty, and not gifts of grace. If salvation 
comes on account of man's performance of his duty, it is of works in some sense. 
He brings in the modern missionary enterprise, a system somewhat like the 
popish measures for propogating their creed, but unknown to the Bible and to 
Baptists, and is a disturber of gospel peace and order among churches. His 
followers have departed from the truth further than he did as he refused flattering 



PREFACE. 



titles which they accept for modesty's sake without much urging, and they do 
not preach salvation as nearly by grace as he did, so they are waxing worse and 
worse. As the world is to be evangelized, the tender mind of the young must be 
converted by means of the newly invented Sunday Schools, and humanly pre- 
pared preachers must be sent to the heathen. Some man must hold the hand 
of the missionary while he goes down into the wells, and he must see how his 
bread comes before he goes; and your churches combine in forming such tre- 
mendous agencies of power as your conventions, while you all glory in the 
fruits of your wise system. That your denomination generally indorse your 
system is manifest and what little I write may only have the effect of influencing 
them to fall down before their idols, and shout in louder strains, 'Great is 
Diana of the Ephesians.' " 

In setting no value upon Theological Seminaries, Colleges, etc., in qualifying 
men for ministerial duties, the Editor, and those he represents, would not be 
understood to oppose or undervalue human learning. On the other hand the 
Baptists have ever been warm friends of education, and the earnest advocates 
of civil and religious liberty, without which education, in its broad, unfettered 
and true sense can never exist. Their loyalty almost without exception, to the 
cause of freedom during the dark days of the Revolution, as testified to by 
Washington himself; — their record since as law abiding citizens; as faithful 
officers in various departments of government; as educators, philanthropists, 
authors, etc., their support of a dozen or more religious periodicals published by 
their own brethren and the liberal patronage and earnest support they give to 
all non-sectarian schools from the public free school to the highest universities, 
all go to prove their friendship for, and advocacy of, education. 

But all Bible students are well aware that the world by wisdom knows not 
God. The wisdom of this world can comprehend only the things of this world — ■ 
cannot attain unto spiritual knowledge. The wise man is just as dependent upon 
God for crumbs of spiritual truth as is the ignorant man. This knowledge comes 
not by the "willings and doings" of men but by the revelation of God; and God 
is just as able to reveal His truth to the ignorant Peter as to the learned Paul. 
And more, we are told that while God calls some wise men into his service he 
does not call for many, for Paul says: "For ye see your calling, brethren, how that 
not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called. 
But God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and 
God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which 
are mighty. And base things of the world, and things which are despised, 
hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that 
are: That no flesh should glory in His presence." 

Now this grand truth is not spoken for the exaltation of the ignorant, but 
for the exaltation of God. The ignorant cannot glory in his ignorance nor the 
wise in his wisdom but both are equally made dependent upon Him who is the 
source of all knowledge — the Giver of every good and perfect gift, and both are 
exhorted to "study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth 
not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth." And while the ministry 
of the Primitive or Old School Baptist Church do not make it a point to utudy 
to show themselves approved unto man or unto the world, yet the Editor believes 
that even though time should fail eternity will not fail to reveal the fact that 
they do study to show themselves approved unto God. In fact, they are warned 
by inspiration that if they seek to please men, or the world, they are no longer 
the servants of Christ. They manifest that they are anxious to 'render unto 
Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's." 

Thus there should be a separation of Church and State followed by a dis- 
tinction between the wisdom of this world and the wisdom of God, and as we look 



180582 



10 PRBF'ACE. 

to the school of men to qualify us for efficient service in the kingdins of this 
world, so we should look to the school of Christ to qualify us for efficient service 
in His kingdom which "is not of this world." And if we are students in the 
Master's school of experience we shall "grow in grace and in knowledge" and 
learn from Him and His inspired Text Book that the qualifications mentioned 
therein are for the called and fully qualified servant is that he must be "gentle, 
humble, quiet, firm, virtuous, upright, just, sober, temperate, unselfish, not covet- 
ous, well proved, exemplary, of good repute, sound in doctrine able and apt to 
teach, divinely impressed with the work of the ministry, not for ambitious or 
sordid ends, but for the good of men and the glory of God." Gal. i; Eph., 3 and 
8:16; John 21:15-17; and 26:13-15; Mat. 10:1-6; Rom., 5:5; II Cor., 5:5-6; I Tim., 
3:1-7 and 4:12-16; Titus, 1:6-9; Acts, 20-: 28; I Peter, 5:1-4; I Cor., 9:16). 

Realizing the high and holy calling and the divine qualifications the ministry 
of the Primitive or Old School Baptist Church, as a rule, feel their unworthiness 
and insufficiency for these things, and are, therefore not those who seek no- 
toriety. They shrink from, rather than desire, publicity, and the editor in the 
preparation of this work, more than ever before has been made cognizant of this 
trait of their character. To collect data for the biographical matter herein 
presented required his persistent requests published in our denominational 
papers, his personal appeals by private correspondence and the assistance of 
many friends, among whom are mentioned: Elders Sylvester Hassell, Walter 
Cash, F. A. Chick, J. T. Rowe, J. G. Webb, R. W. Thompson, J. T. Oliphant, F. P. 
Brascome, J. H. Fisher, Lee Hanks, J. A. Ashbourn, B. E. Bourland, J. K. Free- 
man, H. M. Farley, J. J. Gilbert, E. E. Lundy, G. E. Mayfield, Henry Taylor 
and John T. Blanchard; Brethren J. W. Jones, J. G. Wiltshire and C. C. Aylett; 
and Miss Fannie Lou Raulston, Mrs. S. J. Buckhalt, Mrs. Bettie Leggitt and Miss 
Annie Crisp, for which the editor desires to express his sincere thanks. 

Acknowledgement is also made to Elders Sylvester Hassell and George W. 
Stewart for freely quoting from the Church History and The Two Witnesses as 
appears in the appendix of this work. 

In conclusion the editor wishes to say that his work, like himself, bears 
many of the marks of imperfection. Within the period of its preparation he has 
endeavored to make it fairly representative. He could not hope for more than 
this. For to gather even the briefest information of All Primitive or Old School 
Baptist Ministers, would be almost an impossible task. Many worthy ministers, 
now living, would furnish no information of their lives, and their friends failed 
to do so for them. Others delayed sendng data until too late; while on the other 
hand the editor may have in a few instances, been taken advantage of and some 
may appear herein who are really in disorder at home, and unworthy of repre- 
sentation, for an investigation in all cases of the personnel of the work was next 
to impossible. 

It has been his purpose on the one hand to steer clear of any who fail to 
adcrn the doctrine of God our Saviour with a godly walk and conversatin, and 
also those restless, progressive spirits amcng us who seem not satisfied with the 
order of God's house but who are clamoring for new practices unauthorized by 
God's word and unprecedented in Baptist History and who are pressing such 
things to the extent of division, thus manifesting they prefer innovations to the 
fellowship of the great body of Baptists. 

And on the other hand the editor has taken a broad view of those points 
of doctrine and practices such as predestination and feet-washing, which has 
ever, to some extent, been open questions among our people, and over which 
there has been more a war of words than of principle; and advocates of different 
shades of opinion on such matters are given equal representation. 

The preparation of the work has imposed a vast responsibility and an 
immense amount of labor. The manuscript was prepared amid the many duties 



PREFACE. 11 



of a busy life and under various circumstances — sometimes on railroad trains, 
sometimes while waiting at stations for the cars, etc., and it is therefore, desired 
that the reader freely use "a mantle of charity" in its perusal. 

The editor has labored, not only to present a useful, interesting and readable 
book, but one that will also be unifying, edifying and beneficial to our people. 
How well he has succeeded remains to be seen. But whatever the result, he 
feels that the motive prompting the undertaking and prosecution of the work 
was a pure one. A long felt desire to render an essential service to the cause 
of truth has been the "guiding star." The humble and faithful "soldiers of the 
Cross," who after spending their lives in obscurity and "of whom the world is 
not worthy " should not, he feels, be forgotten. And as we love to see their 
graves marked, let us also seek to perpetuate their memory in a more enduring 
way than the sculptor's chisel on the marble slab, and teach our children to 
honor their names; to reverance the God they served; and, at least, to respect 
the principles for which they have so faithfully and unselfishly labored. 

That this work may be blessed of God to His glory and the benefit of His 
people is the earnest wish of 
Luray, Virginia, May 27, 1909. R. H. PITTMAN. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 13 




fc 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 




1% 



Title to this worK 5 

Copyright 6 

Preface 8 

Special Notice 15 

SKetches and Pictures of Ministers 17 

(In Alphabetical Order.) 

Deacons, with some personal mention of the officers 308 

(In Alphabetical Order.) 

Some Talented and Spiritually Minded Sisters— 323 
"Mothers in Israel," Etc. <i n Alphabetical order.) • • • • 323 

APPENDIX — CONTAINIG THE FOLLOWING SUBJECTS: 

The Bible 342 

The Full Divine Inspiration of the Bible — 343 

Twelve Works of the Apostolic Church 346 

Some Important Dates in Church History — 347 

Denominations 349 

Roman Catholic Church 354 

Baptist Denominations 357 

The Old School Address at the Block Rock Con- 
vention ^60 

World's Population— Religious and Otherwise — 368 

Some Old Churches 369 

Baptist Associations 370 

Union Meetings • • 370 

Our Saturday and Sunday Meeting's 371 



14 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS—CONTINUED. 



Missions 3 7 

Sunday Schools 378 

Secret Societies 379 

Modern Secret Societies 381 

Instrumental Music in Churches 382 

Christmas 383 

One Sentence —Longest in Print — 384 

Our "Christian Nation" 388 

A Pen Picture of Jesus 388 

Civil War Record 389 

Elder John Leland's Theology 389 

Sketch of John Gill 390 

Sketch of Joseph Philpot 391 

Soul and Spirit ■ 391 

Sunday 391 

The Saved— The Lost 392 

Cain's Wife 392 

Church Government 393 

Family Worship 393 

Crime Increasing'— Morals Declining' 393 

The Hireling 394 

The Serpent and Eve 395 

Melchizedek — 396 

The Negro 396 

Federal Councils of the Churches of Christ — 396 

Reverend 397 

God is not the Author of Sin 397 

"Our Funeral," with some Facts and Statistics 397 

Names of 825 of our Ministers whose Sketches 

do not appear in this work 400 

Advertisement— Relig'ious Periodicals 405 

Final Notice 406 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 15 



SPECIAL NOTICE 



The reader who may find errors in this book, whether in names, dates, places, 
principles or practices, is requested to advise the editor of such errors, with 
proofs of same that they may be eliminated from future editions. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



17 



A 



ELIHU R. ABERNATHY. 



Abernathy, Elder Elihu R., was 

bom September 2, 1838, and died July 
9, 1903. He professed a hope in Jesus 
September, 1877, of which hope he 
was ready at all times to give a rea- 
son. Upon a profession of his faith 
he was received into the fellowship of 
Macedonia Primitive Baptist Church, 
Bartow County, Ga., November 2, 
1877, and was baptized the following 
day, and was ordained to the full 
work of the gospel ministry February 
2, 1889. Wjas married to Miss Malinda 
W. George, January 14, 1862. He was 
a faithful minister and gave evidence 
in his life, and even on his death-bed, 
that he had been with Jesus and had 
learned of Him. 



J. E. ADAMS. 



Adams, Elder J. E., of Angier, N. C, 
the second of thirteen children born 
unto Joseph and Tillitha Adams, was 
born in Cumberland County, N. C, 
January 11, 1834. His opportunities 
for an education were very limited, 
yet he had a thirst for knowledge 
which he improved and thus became 
possessed of much general informa- 
tion. At an early age he had serious 
thoughts of life and death, hell and 
heaven, and began a system of refor 
mation in which he was, at the age 
of twenty-five, trusting for Salvation, 
when he was deeply convicted of his 
lost condition by the application on 
his mind of the words of Jesus, "Ye 
must be born again." After this he 
entered the army, went through three 
years of service and returned home 
full of thanksgiving for God's protect- 
ing care, though still burdened with 
the laws condemning sentence. He 
was in much soul sorrow until 
June 11, 1871, when God at the mid- 
night hour spoke peace to his soul. 
For some days he passed through a 
season of rejoicing, but soon the 
words of Paul were applied to his 
mind and heart in a deep and lasting 
manner — "Unto me who am the least 
of all Saints, is this grace given that 
I should preach among the Gentiles 
the unsearchable riches of Christ." 
This, he felt, was a call to the minis- 
try, and gave him much trouble be- 
cause of his feeling sense of unfitness 



and unworthiness. Soon after this he 
joined the Church at Fellowship in 
Johnson County, and was baptized by 
Elder Moore Stephenson. Within a 
few months he was licensed to 
preach, and on August 3, 1873, was 
ordained to the full functions of the 
Gospel, and has since been preaching 
Jesus, the way, the truth and the life. 
Elder Adams is an humble, faithful 
minister, has traveled considerably 
among the Baptists in North Carolina 
and the Southern States, and has 
been well received by them. 



WILLIAM ADAMS. 

Adams, Elder William, fell asleep 
in the triumphs of a living faith in 
Jesus, November 22, 1895, at his res- 
idence in Newton County, Ga., in the 
65th year of his age. He was a son of 
James and Frances Adams, of Jasper 
County, Ga. In 1849, he and 'Miss 
Susan F. Hurst, of Newton County, 
Ga., were united in marriage, with 
whom he lived happily until death. In 
1855 both of them were baptized at 
the same time into the fellowship ot 
Harris Spring Church, Newton Coun- 
ty, Ga., by Elder I. Hamby, where he 
remained an orderly and exemplary 
member till removed by death. Soon 
after he united with the church he 
acted in the capacity and served the 
church both as clerk and deacon, sat- 
isfactorily, until he was called to or- 
dination as a minister of Christ, in 
1877. The presbytery was composed 
of Elders I. Hamby, WV D. Almond, J. 
G. Eubanks, and J. M. Gunter. He was 
judged worthy and set apart to the 
full work of the ministry. From that 
time he served his own church faith- 
fully and other churches as pastor, 
until death, and his labors were truly 
blessed of the Lord. It was evident he 
had a pastoral gift. He was blessed 
and prospered of the Lord both spirit- 
ually and temporally; was blessed 
with a large and devoted family and 
useful citizens. To them were born 
sixteen children; ten sons and four 
daughters now living — all grown, 
seven of whom are orderly and con- 
sistent members of the Primitive 
Baptist church, and we have evidence 
to hope and believe that others of 
them have a good hope through grace. 
His remains were laid to rest in the 
family cemetery, near his residence, 



18 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



surrounded by a host of weeping, 
heart-stricken relatives and friends. 
There were present Elders W. D. Al- 
mond, F. M. McLeroy, J. F. Almond, 
N. B. Hardy, M. F. Hurst, and John 
D. Curtis. Elders W. D. Almond, Mc- 
Leroy and Hurst preached appropri- 
ate and comforting discourses from 
the text, "Blessed and holy is he that 
hath part in the first resurrection; 
over such the second death hath no 
power." 




GEORGE ALBERTY. 

Alberty, Elder George (1849-1906), 
of Missouri, was an humble, faithful 
minister. He received a hope in Christ 
in the year 1871, and united with 
Clear Creek church ofl Primitive Bap- 
ists, and was baptized by Elder Wim. 
Yeoman. From the time he united 
with the church he was impressed 
to preach, but did not obey, for some- 
time, but tried to keep it to himself, 
but his chastening was so great that 
many nights he cried until his pillow 
was wet with tears. He said it seemr 
ed more than he could bear. Other 
ministers saw his calling without him 
telling. He went to meeting, but took 
a back seat, but Elder W.hitely said, 
■"Brother George, come and preach 
for us, you will have it to do." He 
rose up and went to the pulpit, and as 
be entered the pulpit this Scripture 
came to his mind, and he quoted it, 
"Behold what manner of love the 
Father hath bestowed on us, that we 
should be called the sons of God," and 
preached about thirty minutes. He 
felt that the Comforter was with him, 
that it was better to obey and have 
sweet comfort than to disobey and 



suffer the chastening rod, so he ever 
afterwards followed that rule, and 
was a faithful soldier of the cross. He 
was ordained to the full work of the 
minisry in 188G. In 1895, he was 
chosen pastor of Clear Creek and re- 
mained her pastor until his death. The 
last few years of his life he was pas- 
tor of Clear Creek, Little Northfork 
and Stalls Creek churches. 




T. N. ALDERTON. 

Alderton, Elder T. N., was born Oc- 
tober 15, 1849, and died July 15, 190G. 
While preaching at Granville Baptist 
Church, West Virginia, he was strick- 
en with apoplexy and was soon un- 
conscious and sweetly fell asleep in 
Jesus at 5:30 p. m. the same day. 
Brother Alderton was the sen of Wil- 
liam and Mary Alderton and was born 
on the slope of Springcap mountain, 
near Paw Paw, W. Va. His parents 
were of English nationality; were 
poor as to the natural blessings of 
this life, and the opportunity for edu- 
cating their children was very limit- 
ed, so that what education our gifted 
brother acquired was mostly from 
reading extensively in books and pa- 
pers. Few were better informed than 
he. W^en he was eleven years of age 
the Civil war spread its desruction 
and blighting influence *>\hich made it 
difficult to even get a paper to read. 
So his natural privileges for an educa- 
tion were very poor; but he was 
blessed of the Lord with true wisdom 
and received much instruction in the 
school of Christ. His parents were 
members of Little Capon Church of 
Primitive Baptists, Hampshire Coun- 
ty, W. Va. He was blessed of 1 the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



19 



Lord with a good hope when seven- 
teen years of age and was received by 
Little Capon Church on an humble 
confession of faith in Jesus and 
was baptized by Elder Philip 
Mclnturff, in July, 18G7. Here 
he remained an honored mem 
ber until Enon church was organized, 
which was more convenient to him, 
where he obtained membership and 
was chosen clerk, which office he 
filled until after he began to preach. 
In the twenty-second year of his 
eventful life, December, 1871, he 
was united in marriage to Sarah F. 
Powell, Elder John A. Corder officiat- 
ing. In March, 1883, his useful minis- 
try began by an investigation of the 
84th Psalm. In October of the same 
year he was given license by his 
church to preach where the Lord di- 
rected him. And January 24, 1885, 
Elders P. Mclnturff, J. Correll and C. 
L. Funk ordained him to the full func- 
tion of his calling to serve the church. 
He was much interested concern- 
ing the Lord's people who were 
destitute of gospel preaching and vis- 
ited many of said places, some an- 
nually, Avhere they longed for his 
coming and his words of cheer. It 
would be difficult to find a more 
faithful and useful man in the minis 
try of the Primitive Baptist Church. 
During his long service as a minister 
he served four churches and some- 
times had the care of five, traveled 
on a conservative estimate three to 
four thousand miles a year, married 
over a hundred couples and baptized 
many mpre. From the best informa- 
tion I have Elder Alderton served 
during his ministry the following 
churches: Great Capon, Enon, Ten 
Mile Tonaloway, Bethel, Mill Creek. 
Little Capon, Grassy Lick and Branch 
Mountain. 



J. T. ALEXANDER. 

Alexander, Elder J. T., was born in 
Prince William County, Va., in 1836, 
and received into the fellowship of 
the Primitive Baptist Church at North 
Fork, Loudoun County, Va., in 1878 
where his membership now is. He 
was ordained in 1882 by Elders John 
Clark, Paul Yates, Joseph Correll, and 
Benjamin Bridges. Elder Alexander 
has served old Chappawomsic Church 
since the death of Elder John Clark, 
a quarter of a century ago. He has 
also during his ministry, served 
White Oak, Greenwood, Zion, and In- 
dependent Hill churches and is an 



humble, meek and faithful brother. 
Though he has traveled some his la- 




J. T. ALEXANDER 



bors have been mostly 
churches in Virginia. 



confined to 



BURDITT O. ALLEN. 

Allen, Elder Burditt O., of Missouri, 
was born in Madison County, Septem- 
ber 13, 1811, and died June 24, 1873. 
United with the Baptists 1841, and or- 
dained 1843. He was a man of indus- 
try, thrift and energy, though not of 
robust health. He was a farmer, went 
into the forest, cleared the ground, 
cut and hewed the logs for his dwell- 
ing, barn, and out-houses, and though 
he served four churches regularly 
most of his ministerial life, that did 
not help him much in a financial way, 
yet he was blessed of the Lord to live 
above want, and was charitable to- 
ward the poor. He was a good neigh- 
bor, a valued citizen and was re- 
spected and honored by all, though 
many did not like his preaching be- 
cause of the doctrine he so firmly 
contended for. He' had no compromise 
to make with error and contended 
earnestly for the faith once delivered 
unto the Saints. He died several years 
ago, after a long term of useful ser- 
vice, though exact dates could not be 
obtained. 



J. T. ALLEN. 

Allen, Elder J. T., of Hale County, 
Ala., was born June 16, 1821, died 
March 19, 1885. He was highly es- 



20 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



teemed by Primitive Baptists, among 
whom he traveled and preached ex- 
tensively; and a more acceptable 
minister, in every particular, would 
be hard to find. His meek and humble 
bearing in and out of the pulpit won 
for him the sincere love and esteem 
of his brethren and friends. Often he 
would rise before a congregation to 
address them with tears in his eyes, 
indicating his sincerity and the deep 
solemn emotions of his soul; and 
often the congregation would be al- 
most as deeply affected under his 
preaching. As a citizen and neighbor 
he was greatly beloved. Honest and 
industrious, he was referred to by the 
business men of Hale County as "One 
that is as good as gold." There were 
certain indescribable traits of char- 
acter possessed by him that caused 
him to be recognized as one of na- 
ture's noblemen. He ever contended 
for the good way, determined to know 
nothing but Christ and Him crucified 
in his ministry, and died in the full 
triumph of faith, among his last 
words being, "My hope is in God and 
not in man." 



W. D. ALMOND. 

Almond, Elder W. D., was born on 
April 21, 1821, and died November 15, 
1903, in Rockdale County, Georgia. 
His parents were John D. and Mary V. 
Almond. His father was a Primitive 
Baptist preacher and served from four 
to six churches. Brother Almond mar- 
ried Martha Curtis May 11, 1843, who 
made him a faithful and loving com- 
panion. He claimed a hope in the year 
'38 joined the "Missionaries" in '45, 
staid with them until '51, soon after- 
wards joined the Primitive Baptists, 
and in a year or two began exercising 
in public, and was soon called to take 
the care of four churches. He served 
them faithfully as one that careth for 
the sheep. One of the churches he serv- 
ed over forty years, and baptized a 
great many. He was very industrious, 
and made all his supplies on his farm, 
working with his own hands, not to be 
an incumbrance on his brethren. He 
was an excellent provider for his fam- 
ily. He raised eight children, six girls 
and two boys. One daughter died Aug- 
ust 11, 1853. He gave each one of them 
a home. He was strictly honest, and 
very prompt in his promises. His 
word was as good as the money every- 
where he was known. He knew no 
man after the flesh, and made many 
enemies because he contended so 



earnestly for the doctrine of election 
and predestination. 



F. M. AMBROSE. 

Ambrose, Elder F. M., was born in 

-, and died February 8, 1881. 



He was a faithful minister and regu- 
larly attended and preached to the 
church at Indian Creek, and baptized 
most of its members. While he lived 
he missed only one of his regular 
church meetings and that was only 
three days before he died. During his 
last sickness he talked a great deal 
of his approaching dissolution and 
said the thoughts of death brought no 
terror to his mind, that his faith was 
strong in God, that His promises were 
immovable, and that his own inbred 
corruptions which had caused him so 
much trouble, were now an evidence 
to him that Christ alone was the sin- 
ner's Saviour. 



J. I. AMBROSE. 

Ambrose, Elder J. I., of Cresswell, 
N. C, was born June 28, 1847; had 
few oportunities to secure an educa- 
tion; grew up in love with, and fol- 
lowed willingly, the paths of sin until 
his twenty-fifth year, when it pleased 
the Lord to convict him, convert his 
soul, kill him to the love of sin and 
give him a view of Jesus as his Sa- 
viour. He united with Concord Church 
in 1872, was chosen deacon in 1874, 
licensed to preach in 1880, and in 
1884 was ordained to the ministry by 
Elders Stephen Biggs and J. T. Rowe. 
Elder Ambrose is, at present, pastoi 
Oifi Concord Church. His labors have 
been confined mostly to his home and 
nearby churches — having never been 
impressed to travel and preach among 
other churches. 



WILLIAM ANDERSON. 

Anderson, Elder William, was born 
in North Carolina, removed to Ten- 
nessee early in life; united in mar- 
riage to Miss Nancy Cheek, at the age 
of twenty; received an experience of 
grace in his twenty-fifth year and 
united with the church February, 
1828. He was ordained in 1836 in Jef- 
ferson County, Tenn., by a presbytery 
consisting of Elders P. A. WJtt, Henry 
Randolph, Noah Cate and Jeremiah 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



21 



Hale. In 1844 the deceased removed 
from Tennessee to Kentucky, and in 
1846 united with the church at Rock 
Spring in Onsley County. His labors 
were constant and unremitting. Thor- 
oughly persuaded of the truth of the 
doctrines as held by his brethren ot 
the Old School Baptist Church, he 
never hesitated to vindicate that 
truth, whether men would hear or 
forbear; but instinctively kind and 
gentle, he never unnecessarily tram- 
pled on, or wounded the sensibilities 
of those who differed with him. Sal- 
vation by grace and the mercy of 
God shed freely upon sinners, for the 
merit'.s sake of Christ Jesus was his 
unfailing theme and solace. The ad- 
vantages of a thorough education and 
culture had not been granted to him, 
but he was taught of the Lord, and 
on His word he meditated day and 
night; and thus taught, he was al- 
ways an interesting and not unfre- 
quently a most able preacher, build- 
ing up those of like precious faith 
with himself, and warning the un- j 
godly. He died in the full triumph of 
faith November 16, 1867. 




JAMES W. ANDERSON. 



Anderson. Elder James W.. of Conk- 
ling, Ky. This useful and beloved 
minister has the care of four churches 
and is, by the light of Jesus in him 
made to view himself as "the least of 
all Saints." He was born in Buchanan 
County, Mo., October 17, 1863; at the 
age of five moved with his parents to 
Kentucky and grew up on the farm 
with but little advantages of an edu- 
cation. At about the age of nineteen 



he resolved to fit himself for profes- 
sional life; prepared himself and be- 
gan teaching at the age of twenty-one. 
He was married to Miss Louie Mc- 
Collum, of Ousley County, Ky., April 
3, 1888. In the Autumn of 1891, he was 
convicted of sin and made to cry for 
mercy, and so continued for three 
years. Wlhen at last he was blessed 
to realize his acceptance with the 
Beloved, and in April, 1894, asked a 
home with the Old Baptist Church of 
Macedonia in Ousley County, Ky., and 
to his surprise was received into their 
fellowship. He began exercising a 
public gift — in 1896, and was ordain- 
ed to the full work of the ministry in 
1901. 




S. M. ANDERSON. 

Anderson, Elder S. M., of Garfield, 
Ga., has for many years served as 
moderator of the Upper Canoochee 
Association and is a faithful and high- 
ly esteemed minister. He was born in 
Emmanuel County, Ga., in 1846, left 
an orphan when quite young and was 
raised at hard labor with but few ad- 
vantages of an education. As early as 
he can remember he had serious 
thoughts about eternity and felt he 
could, when he got ready, become- a 
Christian. But his conviction for sin 
increased and he was soon made to 
realize his true helpless condi- 
tion by nature, and what he must be 
by grace to see Gcd in peace, and 
many were the trials of his tempest- 
tossed life. But through it all God was 
with him, deliverance came, hope 
sprang up in the place of despair and 
his heart abounded in love for God 
and his church. He united with the 



22 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Primitive Baptists and in a few 
months thereafter was deeply im- 
pressed to preach Jesus, but for years 
struggled against it. After many 
trials, sorrows conflicts, and re- 
newed evidences from the Lord of 
his call to the work he went forward 
in the public duty and was ordained 
by Hebron Church in 1877. Elder An- 
derson has had the care of three or 
four churches most all the time since 
his ordination and has served his 
home church — Hebron — thirty-one 
years. He has baptized about three 
hundred persons and his labors have 
been blessed to the upbuilding of the 
broken walls of Zion. 



E. L, ANDERSON. 

Anderson, Elder E. L., of Cave 
Spring, Ky., This faithful minister 
has the care of Lebanon and other 
churches, and is also Moderator of the 
Red River Association of Primitive 
Baptists. 



J. E. ARMSTRONG. 

Armstrong, Elder J. E., was born 
in 1808 and died December G, 1891. 
He was indeed a father in Israel and 
for about fifty years stood upon the 
walls of Zion preaching the everlast- 
ing gospel of God's dear Son. He 
fought a good fight and finished his 
course with joy. The editor was un- 
able to obtain further statistics of 
this beloved brother's life and labors 
in the ministry. 



W. C. ARNOLD. 

Arnold, Elder W. C, a faithful, use- 
ful and much beloved man of God, 
modestly speaks of himself thus: "I 
was born in Pike County, Ind., April 
20, 1869. My parents were members 
of the Primitive Baptist Church from 
my earliest recollection. My grand- 
father, Elder J. W. Arnold, deceased, 
preached for the Baptists many years. 
If not deceived I received a sweet 
hope in Jesus June 22, 1884. Febru- 
ary 22, 1888, I was married to Miss 
Martha B. France. In the Spring of 
1889, I asked for a home in the 
church at Pleasantville, Ind., and was 
baptized the third Sunday in April by 
Elder John T. Oliphant, pastor of the 
church. My wife was baptized a year 
before. I was ordained to the full 



functions of the gospel ministry, No- 
vember 15, 1897, and have been pas- 
tor of from two to four churches, and 
traveled and preached where I have 
felt the Lord directed. I am now pas- 
tor of three churches. Our only living 
child, a daughter, is a member of the 
dear old church with us. Our other 




W. C. ARNOLD 

child, a son, is safely sleeping in 
Jesus. Many have been my trials, but 
God's grace has been sufficient." 
Through all the unrest and trouble 
in the church Brother Arnold has re- 
mained firm and uncompromising, 
ever contending for the Bible doc- 
trine of salvation by grace. 




JESSE A. ASHBURN. 



Ashburn, Elder Jesse A., of Pilot 
Mountain, N. C. This able minister 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



23 



of the New Testament is clerk of the 
Fisher's River Primitive Baptist As- 
sociation of Western North Carolina, 
and serves churches within its 
bounds. He wrote and published in 
1905 a History of the Fisher's River 
Primitive Baptist Association from 
its organization in 1832 to 1904. This 
is an interesting work, especially to 
the seven or eight hundred members 
of this body, and shows careful re- 
search upon the part of the editor. 
Elder Ashburn is a zealous worker 
in the Master's vineyard and a bold 
defender of the doctrine and practice 
of the Apostolic Church, and it is 
with regret that the editor failed to 
secure sufficient data from which to 
prepare a more suitable sketch of his 
life and labors. 




W. S. AT HEY. 

Athey, Elder W. S, was born Sep- 
tember 27, 1841, and departed this life 
August 29, 1902. He joined the New 
School party when young, but finding 
out his mistake later he left them and 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Thumb Run in Fanquier County 
Va., in 1877. In 1878 he was ordained 
to the work of the ministry. As long 
as he was able to attend the churches 
he rode through fair and stormy 
weather to proclaim to them the un- 
searchable riches of Christ. He was 
married to Miss Alburtis A. Garrison 
January 18, 1864, After fighting the 
good fight of faith he has gone to his 
rest to enjoy that sweet inheritance 
to which he fell heir by the re- 
demption of Christ. His mortal re- 
mains were buried on the old battle 



ground at Manassas, Va., at his re- 
quest, where he fought in the famous 
battle of Bull Run. 



W. H. ATKINSON. 

Atkinson, Elder W. H., of Round 
Peak, N. O, was born in Caswell 
County, N. O, June 12, 1853, near 
Moons' Creek Primitive or Old School 
Baptist Church, which was organized 
before, and passed through, the divi- 
sion with the Missionary or New, 
School Baptist 1828-85. Elder Atkin- 
son united with Union Church in Sur- 
ry County, in 1888, began preaching 
the same year and was ordained to 
the gospel work in 1890. He has since 
had the care of churches and is at 
present serving four, and the Lord 
has blessed his labors to the upbuild- 
ing of the broken walls of Zion's city. 



T. E. ATTEBERY. 

Attebery, Elder T. E., of Elgin, Ore- 
gon, was born in Macon County., Ills., 
February 26, 1865. In his fourteenth 
year of age he was convicted of sin 
and made to feel the exceeding sin- 
fulness of sin, and for some time 
labored under the law in order that 
his good works might influence the 
Lord to save him, but he learned that 
the law was only a ministration of 
death and not of life. And as this 
knowledge dawned upon him he won- 
dered how God could save him and be- 
just. But was taught, by faith, that 
Christ was the end of the law for 
righteousness to every one that be- 
lieveth. When he was enabled to 
claim this sweet hope, he tarried not 
but united with Mt. Zion Church, and 
was baptized by Elder Jesse Shields. 
Though he, at the time of his deliv- 
erence from the burden of sin, felt a. 
strong desire to publish to others, the 
Saviour he had found, yet, Jonah-like, 
he tried to run from the Lord and 
hide from his people; and it was not 
until he had been taught many les- 
sons by sad experience that he in 
October, 1906, was ordained to the- 
full work of the ministry. Elder Atte- 
bery is a fellow-laborer with Elder 
G. B. Mayfield in the far W/est, and 
his preaching is blessed to the com- 
fort and edification of God's humble 
children. Though young in the minis- 
try he is well established in the doc- 
trine of God our Saviour and in the 
practice of His church. 



24 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 




A. J. ANSTIN. 



Austin, Elder A. J., was born on 
Roanoke Island, N. C, May 22, 1848, 
and lived there till 1875, when he 
moved to Kitty Hawk, Currituck Coun- 
ty, N. C, and died of apoplexy at Paul 
Gamiel's Hill Life Saving Station, six 
miles north of Kitty Hawk, November 
5, 1902. He married Miss Martha 
Perry, May 25, 1869. Elder S. Hassell 
says of him: "He was a fisherman 
until 1878, when he was appointed by 
the United States Government keeper 
of the above named life saving sta- 
tion, and remained so till his death. 
He united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church in 1869, and was ordained to 
the ministry in January, 1883, and 
was called in 1884 to the pastoral 
care of Providence Church, at Kitty 
Hawk, and afterwards to that of Elim 
Church, at Powell's Point, and was 
pastor of these two churches at his 
death. He preached the fourth Satur- 
day and Sunday in October, 1902, at 
Providence Church, and was taken 
sick Monday, and died the following 
Wednesday week. When he was a 
school boy his teacher gave him a 
Bible for telling the truth. He was 
■one oli the humblest, kindest and 
gentlest ol men; good to the poor 
and needy, never refusing them a 
lavor, and loved by all who knew 
him, and resigned in his many and 
sore trials, to the will ol the Lord. 
He was one ol the best Iriends I ever 
had; helped me to pay the Church 
History debt, and entertained me re- 
peatedly and most brotherly at his 



hospitable home. His life was a bright 
and shining light on the northeastern 
coast of North Carolina. He proved 
that he was what he professed to be 
— a child of God and a minister ol 
Christ." He lell asleep in Jesus No- 
vember 5, 1902. 




PETER AUSMUS. 



Ausmus, El'der Peter, (1811-1878), 
was born in Powell's Valley, Tenn. 
He received a hope in 1833 and first 
joined the Missionary Baptists, but in 
November, 1848 , united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church called New 
Salem in Brown County, Ills. He was 
ordained in 1852, and proved to be a 
successful pastor and was much lov- 
ed. Many yet living remember his 
labors of love and testify to his faith- 
ful life and noble character. 



W. R. AVERY. 



Avery, Elder W. R., of Strouds, 
Ala. This able minister is noted for 
his faithfulness to his churches and 
his zeal in the cause of truth. Sound 
in the faith, strictly moral and order- 
ly, and free from foolish jesting and 
ungodly conversation, his life is a 
blessing to others and his influence 
for good is great. He sets a good ex- 
ample to believers to bear the yoke 
of Christ without murmuring, and it 
is regretted that data lor a more de 
tailed sketch could not be secured. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



25 



B 



C. B. BALLARD. 



Ballard, Elder C. B., of Hunter's 
Springs, W. Va. This faithful minister 
has the care of churches in the 
hounds of the Indian Creek Associa- 
tion and is also clerk of this body. 



fourth year he fell asleep in Jesus. 
Among his last words he said: "I am 
going home." 



RILEY BALLARD. 



Ballard, Elder Riley, was born in 
Monroe County, W. Va., February 21, 
1838, and died March 8, 1902. Was 
ordained deacon November 1, 1879. 
Was with others constituted into the 
Flat Wjoods Church, where he re- 
mained a faithful member the remain- 
der of his life. The church seeing his 
qualifications and believing Mm to be 
called of God to preach, gave him 
license, and July 23, 1893, ordained 
him to the full work of the ministry. 
He was soon called to take the care 
of the four churches nearest him, he 
served them faithfully as one that 
careth for the sheep, and he left all 
the churches in a warm healthy con- 
dition. He was appointed moderator 
of the Indian Creek Association in 
1901 and served this body faithfully. 



WILLIAM W. BARNES. 



Barnes, Elder William W, (1824- 
1908), of North Carolina, was born in 
Wilson County and was married to 
Mary Eure, January 9, 1845. He had 
long before his death been a Primi- 
tive Baptist, uniting with the church 
at White Oak, Wilson County, N. C. 
He was ordained there, and was the 
oldest Primitive Baptist preacher in 
this country. He moved to Hyde 
County, N. C, January, 1882, where 
he died. Elder Barnes, was a clear, 
sound preacher in the doctrine, and 
in his early ministry baptized many 
people. His churches prospered. He 
was active and laborious as a preach- 
er taking long trips among the 
churches, and was well received 
among the Baptists. In his eighty- 




J. T. BARNES. 



Barnes, Elder J. T., ofl Missouri, 
was born in Boone County, Mo., Octo- 
ber 13, 1855, and united with Little 
Arrow Rock Church in Saline County, 
in June, 1889, and has since had the 
care of churches, to which he 
preaches salvation by grace alone. 
He is firm in the faith and practice 
of the Apostolic Church, and the edi- 
tor regrets a more complete sketch 
could not be obtained. 



J. A. BATES. 



Bates, Elder J. A., was born in Tus- 
caloosa County, Ala., November 1G, 
1834, and died August 7, 1896. He ex- 
perienced a hope in 1857, and two 
years afterwards joined the Mission- 
ary Baptist Church. Shortly after- 
wards he was ordained as a minister 
of that order and officiated as a min- 



26 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ister until he had lived with them 
twenty years, in which time he be- 
came dissatisfied and joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Bethle- 
hem, Neshoba County, Miss., on the 
12th of October, 1879, and in a short 
time was called to ordination by that 
church, and was set apart to the full 
work of the ministry. He was sound 
in the faith, and contended earnestly 
for the faith once delivered to the 
Saints; and salvation by grace was 
his theme. He lived an orderly mem- 
ber of the church, and was ever 
found at his regular meetings, when 
not providentially hindered. A good 
man, a faithful husband, a loving 
father, a zealous member of the 
church, and, above all, a Christian 
and faithful minister of Jesus. 



EPHRAIM BARKER. 

Barker, Elder Ephrain, of Gratiot, 
Ohio. The editor failing to secure 
data for a more extended sketch of 
Elder Barker quotes the following 
from Elder Potter's Souvenir book 
printed 1905. He "was born October 2, 
1829, was baptized 1858, and ordained 
May 3, 18G8. He labors as pastor of 
several churches and his labors and 
counsel are highly appreciated by his 
brethren. He has the care of about 
four churches." 




DAVID BARTLEY. 

Bartley, Elder David. For a long 
period of his eventful life Elder Bart- 
ley was a citizen of Crawfordsville, 
Ind. He was the ninth child and sixth 



son of Elder John P. and Charity 
Bartley and was born in Ohio April 
26, 1827. In his seventeenth year of 
age, he was deeply convicted of sin„ 
but was not able to claim a personal 
hope in the Saviour until about ten 
years later. During this period of 
time many were his trials, tempta- 
tions and deliverances; much his 
sorrow, sadness and darkness, but out 
of it all the Lord delivered him, gave 
him a sweet hope in Jesus and made 
him willing to be anything in the 
house of God; and in June, 1854, he 
united with Conn's Creek Church and 
in January, 1857, was ordained to the 
gospel ministry. Elder Bartley was 
not only a deep and instructive 
preacher, but was an able writer on 
spiritual subjects. He was a frequent 
writer for the "Signs of the Times," the 
"Monitor" and others of our periodicals 
and also wrote and published the fol- 
lowing books: "Early Religious Life" 
(of himself), "Man Redeemed," anc* 
"Mercy Deering." These writings and 
others of like character manifest his 
deep spiritual nature and intimate ac- 
quaintance with the Bible — his chief 
text-book. Elder Bartley had the care 
of several churches, traveled and 
preached in many states and was ex- 
tensively known among the Baptists 
of the United States, both as a writer 
and preacher, and continued active in 
the ministry almost until his death a 
few years ago, but the editor's failure 
to procure proper information forbids 
an extended notice of his life and 
labor, 



J. N. BARTLETT. 

Bartlett, Elder J. N., of Pennsylva- 
nia. This faithful minister of Jesus 
is the beloved moderator of the Juni- 
ata Primitive Baptist Association, 
and has the care of churches in this 
locality. Specific information as to 
his life and labors could not be se- 
cured. 



G. M. BARTLETT. 

Bartlett, Elder G. M., of Alabama. 
This much esteemed brother was 
born near Salisbury, N. O, January 
18, 1828, and while a small boy mov- 
ed with his father to Monroe County, 
Ga. Wlhen a man he went to Tallapoo- 
sa County, Ala., and in 1852 was bap- 
tized into the fellowship of Emmaus 
Primitive Baptist Church in said 
county by Elder John M. Duke; and 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



27 



October 5th, 1875, the church at 
Mount Gilead ordained him deacon; 
and August 21, 1880, he was licensed 
to preach, and in Hopewell Church, 
Heard County, Ga., he was ordained 
to the fullwork of the ministry Sep- 
tember 7, 1895, by Elders R. T. 
Speight, H. S. Burson, and W. P. Mer- 
rell. He then moved to Cullman Coun- 
ty, Ala., and by letter joined Fellow- 
ship Church, where he remained a 
faithful and orderly member till his 
death, which occurred June 12, 1898. 
He was a faithful and humble defend- 
er of Primitive Baptist doctrine and 
practice. 




THOMAS BARTON. 

Bartcn, Elder Thomas, of New Jer- 
sey was born September 10, 1787, near 
Washington city. His conviction as a 
sinner in the sight of God was sud- 
den almost as lightning, and also as 
effectual. He -was in the ball-room, 
engaged in the festivities of the 
dance, when he was shocked and 
astounded by a sense of the divine 
presence and his own guilty condi- 
tion, and all further interest in the 
amusements of the hour was at once 
ended. This was in early youth. And 
to a man of his uncommonly lively 
social disposition and flow of animal 
spirits, the change must have been 
indeed wonderful. But the current of 
his whole after life was changed. His 
own experience afforded him an 
answer always to arguments as to 
preaching being the means of the 
conviction and conversion of sin- 
ners. It was not the means in his 
case; he had not been hearing any 
preaching. He said he never had be- 



come acquainted with an instance of 
such pungent exercises and deep dis- 
tress as his own. As in Paul's case, it 
was comparable to a crucifixion; yei 
he was always very tender and for- 
bearing towards those whose exper- 
ience was gradual, and who were 
drawn mainly by the cords of love. 
His baptism appears to have been in 
the year 1810, and his ordination two 
years later. Elder Barton does not ap- 
pear to have ever been allured by the 
flattering pretensions of the various 
societies and institutions that were 
gotten up as auxiliaries to the church. 
He lived before them, saw their rise 
and progress, and was present at the 
Black-Rock convention in 1832 when 
they finally were scourged out of the 
temple. His conversational powers 
were rather extraordinary; and an in- 
exhaustible fund of humor, of wit, of 
anecdote, of apt and striking meta- 
phor seemed to be always accessable. 
His manner of preaching was not 
what is called declamatoiy, but rather 
illustrative. His figures and similes 
would oftentimes amuse, but at the 
same time they would instruct. Their 
effect was solemn conviction. His 
forte seemed to be to instruct and es- 
tablish, rather than to gather in, yet 
to the children he was certainly one 
of those fathers of which we have not 
many. He was pastor of a Baptist 
church in Washington City for a time, 
and traveled much over rough, 
rocky and mountainous districts in 
Maryland and Pennsylvania, on horse- 
back, preaching for small, destitute 
churches, at private houses, and any 
and all places where there was a door 
opened. He shrank from no hardship, 
no exposure to winter storms and 
snows, but went everywhere, and at 
all seasons, preaching the word. 
Elder Barton was polished in his man- 
ners, graceful in his appearance, with 
considerable native eloquence about 
him. The New School division seemed 
disposed to claim, in part, at least to 
persuade themselves, that he was not 
as hard as the rest, and that they 
would be very willing to have him 
with them. On one occasion one of 
their young divinity students sent him 
a challenge to hold a public debate 
with him. He sent him answer to 
"Tarry at Jericho until his beard was 
grown." At another time they appoint- 
ed him a Director in one of their pet 
institutions, and sent him a commis- 
sion. He returned answer that if he 
had any directions to give it would be 
in the words of Jehu, 2 Kings, ix. 34: 
"Go see now this cursed woman and 



28 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



bury her, for she is a king's daugh- 
ter." The apostolic practice was his 
model, and he was always consistent. 
He never hired himself out to preach. 
Although in his earlier years he was 
surrounded with the practice of ask- 
ing and receiving pecuniary stipula- 
tions, even among Baptists, the price 
of his services was never valued with 
dollars and cents. He went forth 
nothing doubting, and returned saying 
that he had lacked nothing. He was 
accustomed to saying that the Lord 
had only promised him bread and 
water, but that he had fared much 
better than that. The whole period of 
his ministry embraced nearly sixty 
years. It might with great propriety 
be said of him that "He finished his 
course with joy, and the ministry that 
he had received." It was a favorite 
sentiment with him: "When a man's 
ways please the Lord, he makes even 
his enemies to be at peace with him." 
He died peacefully, surrounded by lov- 
ing brethren and a devoted family, in 
the' triumphs of faith, in the eighty- 
third year of his age. 



R. BATTEL. 

Battel, Elder R., of Scotts, Ark., is 
Moderator of the Original Pine Light 
Association and serves churches with- 
in the bounds of this association. For 
lack of sufficient data an extended 
notice could not be given of Elder Bat- 
tel's life and labors. 



J. E. BATTLE. 

Battle, Elder J. E. (1858-1908), was 
born in Marion County, Ga., convicted 
of sin in his youth, united with Shi- 
loh church, near Prattsburg, in Tal- 
bott County, in 1880, and was baptized 
by Elder John Hickey. He was a trav- 
eling salesman and seldom had the 
privilege of association with his breth- 
ren but had great love for them, and 
for twenty-four years carried the bur- 
den of an impression to preach the 
gospel. On July 23, 1903, he was lib- 
erated by the Church to preach, and 
having suffered sufficiently to be 
made willing, having learned by expe- 
rience the lesson learned by Jonah, 
that "Salvation is of the Lord," he 
entered boldly into the proclamation 
of the gospel. Soon his gift made 
room for him, and October 10, 1905, 
he was ordained by Elders J. M. Mur- 



ray, D. F. Woodall and S. T. Bentley. 
While his ministerial life was very 
short, it was characterized by faith- 
fulness in contending earnestly for the 
doctrine of his Lord, never for a mo- 
ment willing to compromise truth 
with error, ever manifesting a desire 
to know nothing among the people 
but Jesus Christ and Him crucified 
for salvation; claiming no honor for 
himself, but magnifying the name of 
the Lord. Brother Battle was a man 
of high moral character, faithful in 
all the relations of life, true to his 
convictions of right None who knew 
him doubted his integrity. They might 
differ with him in his opinions, but 
they were obliged to acknowledge his 
sincerity. Merchants have often said 
that they never called in question 
what he told them about goods that 
he offered for sale, nor doubted his 
honesty. By his life of faithfulness he 
has left to his children a rich legacy 
and to his wife a sweet memory of 
having been the wife of such a man 
and the mother of his five children. 



WARREN L. BATTLE. 

Battle, Elder Warren L. This great- 
ly afflicted, but gifted man was born 
in 1822, and died at his home in 
Lowndes County, Ga., December 21, 
1886. He was baptized into the fellow- 
ship of Phillipi Church, Schley Coun- 
ty, by Elder J. R. Respess. Was or- 
dained deacon in the Summer of 1871, 
and moved to Geneva, Ga., in the 
Spring of 1872, and united with the 
Upatoie Church. In the fall of 1876 
he moved to Orange County, Fla., and 
he and his wife put their letters in ai 
the constitution of Fellowship 
Church, Mt. Enon Association, which 
church soon after licensed him to 
preach. He lived in Florida three 
years, and moved back to Georgia 
1880, and united with Cat Creek 
Church, which church had him or- 
dained to the gospel ministry in Sep- 
tember, 1884. He was wonderfully 
gifted in the spiritual meaning of the 
written word of God, and was an un- 
assuming preacher. He often said he 
was not worth anything to the cause 
as a preacher, but the brotherhood 
throughout his acquaintance greatly 
appreciated the gift of Brother Battle. 
The last time he ever spoke publicly 
he was too feeble to stand, and sat in 
his chair and closed the services by 
talking a short while, and many will 
long remember the dear brother's 
good talk. He made known to the con- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



29 



gregation that his departnre was near 
at hand; that perfect love casteth out 
all fear, therefore he was not afraid 
to die. He begged the saints present 
to honor their profession by a well- 
ordered walk and a God-like conversa- 
tion. These few remarks in the way 
of preaching to the people were his 
dying testimony. He was always 
cheerful and pleasant until within a 
few days of his death, a faithful sol- 
dier of Jesus — a man much beloved, 
drank his cup of suffering patiently 
and has been honorably discharged 
from the warfare. 




C. P. BEADLE. 

Beadle, Elder C. P., of Thurston, 
O., was born near Stilesville, Ind., Feb- 
buary 18, 1867; received a hope in 
Christ January 13, 1896, and united 
with the New School or "Missionary" 
Baptists, but soon became dissatisfied 
with them and did not feei at home; 
was led to leave this church and 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
December 12, 1896. He soon began 
talking in public and was on Novem- 
ber 17, 1900, ordained to the full func- 
tions of the gospel and has since had 
the care of churches, is now serving 
three, and has traveled and preached 
among the Baptists of five states. 
Elder Beadle is satisfied with the doc- 
trine and practice of Christ and his 
apostles and wants nothing of human 
origin in the house of God. 



ADDISON BEARD. 

Beard, Elder Addison, of West Vir- 
ginia, died about the year 1898. He 



was a native of Macon County, and 
served churches in the bounds of the 
Pocatalico Associations for about 
twenty years. A full sketch of his life 
and labors could not be secured. 



I. P. BEAN. 

Bean, Elder I. P., was born Septem- 
ber 8, 1851, and died December 6, 
1894. He was a faithful member of 
the Big Creek Church and soon after 
uniting with the church was ordained 
to the full work of the gospel minis- 
try. He was a faithful and exemplary 
minister until his death. 




GILBERT BEEBE. 

Beebe, Elder Gilbert. There has, 
perhaps, been few men since the days 
of the Apostles more gifted in natural 
and spiritual abilities than ay as Elder 
Beebe. Bold and fearless, he fDr more 
than sixty years, with tongue and pen, 
faithfully defended the doctrine of sal- 
vation alone by the grace of God, and 
during his ministry he preached aboui 
10,000 sermons and traveled about 
200,000 miles,— sent forth, not in the 
manner of modern missionaries, by 
"Missionary Funds," but in the man- 
ner of the Apostles and disciples, by 
the God of grace and providence, who 
supplied all his necessities; thus ex- 
hibiting to this materialistic, unbeliev- 



30 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



in age, a life of divine faith, and di- 
vine support. In 1832 he founded a 
semi-monthly periodical called the 
"Signs of the Times," which he con- 
tinued to issue till his death. Elder 
Beebe was born in Norwich, Conn., 
November 25, 1800, and died May 2, 
1SS1. At a very early age he was se- 
riously impressed with a solemn con- 
viction of his sinful and lost condition 
as a sinner and the necessity of be- 
ing born again to qualify him to see 
the Kingdom of God. When he was 
about seven years old he was made to 
hope and rejoice in God as his Sa- 
viour. At this tender age he was 
taught that salvation was of the Lord, 
and never afterwards had the least 
confidence in the power of men to 
effect or help in the salvation of sin- 
ners. He united with the Baptist 
Church in Norwich, Conn., when in 
his eleventh year and was baptized 
by Elder John Sterry, was licensed in 
his eighteenth year and began at once 
to travel as an itinerant preacher 
and was soon called to the 
service of several churches. During 
his ministry he served the following 
churches: the church in Norwich, Eb- 
enezer, Ramopo, New Vernon and 
Middletown and Wallkill in New 
York; the Third Baptist Church in 
Baltimore, Upper Broad Run in Vir- 
ginia, and Shiloh in Washington, D. C. 
Elder Beebe in his auto-biography 
says: "The division, or separation of 
the Missionary Baptists from the Old 
Order, took place in 1832 — during my 
ministry. * * * I found no occasion 
to depart from either the faith or or- 
der of the church of God, as organized 
on the day of Pentecost. I cannot find 
"by sixty years of careful and prayer- 
ful searching of the Scriptures, that 
those Primitive Saints who gladly re- 
ceived the word at Pentecost, and 
continued steadfastly in the apostles' 
doctrine and fellowship had any re- 
ligious organization as auxiliaries to 
the church, existing among them. No 
Mission Boards for converting the 
heathen, or for evangelizing the 
world; no Sunday Schools as nurs- 
eries to the church; no schools of any 
kind for teaching theology or divinity, 
or for preparing young men for the 
ministry." For about fifty years El- 
der Beebe was the able editor oi the 
"Signs of the Times,' and in his de- 
clining years said, "My voice will soon 
be silenced in death, my pen pass into 
the hands of another, and I hope abler 
writer, but the eternal truths for 
which I have so long contended will 
be lasting as the days of eternity; 
and when all the deceptive and luring 



doctrines and institutions of men shall 
be exposed, and all who have trusted 
in a refuge of lies shall bewail their 
folly and call for the rocks and moun- 
tains to hide them from the face of 
Him that sitteth upon the throne, and 
from the presence of the Lamb, those 
who know and love the truth shall in 
the truth rejoice forevermore." 



WM. L. BEEBE. 

Beebe, Elder Wm. L., son of Elder 
Gilbert Beebe, was born October 3, 
1829; died March 28, 1901. At the age 
of twelve he was baptized by his 
father into the fellowship of New Ver- 
non Old School Baptist Church, New 
York. Married in his twentieth year 
to Miss Ella Welch, at Middletown, N. 
Y., and began, about this time, to ex- 
ercise his gift of preaching. He moved 
to the state of Georgia before the civil 
war, and there, for many years, served 
churches and edited the Southern Bap- 
tist Messenger, a periodical devoted 
to the Old School Baptist cause. Here, 
in 1857, he lost his wife and was mar- 
ried to Mrs. John Hawkins, who died 
in 1880. He was, in 1883, married the 
third time, to Miss Tillie A. Scott of 
Oswego, N. Y. He, in connection with 
his brother Benton L. Beebe, edited 
and published the "Signs of The 
Times" from about 1881 until his 
death, and served Ebenezer, Warwick, 
Shoal Creek, Hollis Springs and other 
churches, and leaves the record of 
having discharged his duties well 
wherever his lot has been cast. He 
was, indeed, a devoted husoand, lov- 
ing father and kind friend, an able 
expounder of the Scriptures, and was 
fearless in opposing error, and faith- 
ful in the service of his Mhster. He 
traveled extensively during his public 
life of half a century and was widely 
known among our people in the 
United States and Canada. 



SAMUEL BEENE. 

Beene, Elder Samuel, was born in 
Franklin County, Tenn., July 4, 1813, 
and died in Jasper, Marion County, 
Tenn., November 23, 189G. He obtain- 
ed a hope in Chiist at the early age 
of thirteen years, but did not unite 
with the church till he was more than 
thirty years of age. He united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church at Swee- 
ton's Cove, Marion County, Tenn., 
about the year 184G, and was baptized 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



31 



by Elder John P. Walker. Soon after 
he joined the church, he was made to 
feel that the Lord of the vineyard had 
an important work for him to perform 
in declaring the glorious truths of His 
blessed gospel. Being, as he believed, 
and as we believe, impressed of the 
Lord to this great and responsible 
work, he soon began to preach, and 
his church, feeling satisfied that the 
hand of the Lord was in the work, 
called a presbytery consisting of Eld- 
ers Thomas Hargis and Samuel Mc- 
Bee, which convened July 19, 1854, 
and, after a due consideration of his 
gift, set him apart to the full work of 
a gospel minister; and I here feel to 
say, and believe that I voice the sen- 
timent of all who knew him, that 
there have been but few, or perhaps 
none, who have proven more faithful 
to the charge committed to them than 
was our dear old father in Israel. Al- 
most all the time during his long min- 
isterial life, he had the care of three 
or four churches, some of which were 
at a considerable distance; yet the 
weather was never too bad for him to 
be in attendance, going through rain, 
cold and heat, and with all the bold- 
ness and earnestness of a true soldier, 
ready to meet the enemy at all times 
and places. He was one that believed 
in practicing what he preached, and of 
him it can be truly said by those who 
have so often listened to his strong 
admonitions: "He gave us good ad- 
vice." It would be difficult to find one 
who has been more industrious, and 
who showed a stronger determination 
to be self-sustaining, and while he be- 
lieved and earnestly contended that it 
was the duty of the church to see af- 
ter the needs of her pastor, yet he was 
willing, like Paul the Apostle, to labor 
with his own hands that he might not 
be chargeable to his brethren. 



J. C. BEEMAN. 

Beeman, Elder J. C, was born in 
Green County, Penn., September 12, 
1811, and was a son of Elder Elijah 
Beeman. He was baptized in the fel- 
lowship of! the Providence Church, 
September 29, 1829, by Elder David 
Layman, and began preaching the 
same month. In early life he taught 
school, but in some localities he met 
with opposition from the patrons who [ 
were Arminians. At one place the 
prejudice was so strong against him 
for being a Baptist preacher, that ht 
was dismissed from the school. In 
speaking of this occurrence ai oni, | 



time, he said: "They very well knew 
that if they were teaching school that 
they would try to teach their religion, 
and they judged that I would do the 
same. After this I went to traveling 
and preaching harder than ever." 
When the division took place in 1832 
he was on the side of the "free grace" 
Baptists who were called Old School, 
to distinguish them from tne Mew, oi 
Missionary Baptists. He was also val- 
iant for the truth when Campbellism 




J. C. BEEMAN 

or New-lightism struck the West with 
its plausible story, and was always a 
champion for salvation by grace. 
Election was a favorite theme of his, 
believing that God's people were 
chosen in Christ Jesus before the 
world began, being predestinated unto 
the adoption of children by Jesus 
Christ according to the good pleasure 
of God's will. Elder Beeeman was a 
systematic speaker, beginning his dis- 
courses with arguments that were 
self-evident, laying as it were, a foun- 
dation, then using his best language 
in connection with positive declara- 
tions of Scripture to fill up the ser- 
man, and when he was through he quit. 
Very few of his day handled a text 
with more skill. None were more at- 
tached to the cause of truth, and popu- 
larity held out no inducement for 
him to leave the plain teaching of the 
Scriptures. He would rather be with 
a few or even alone and be right, than 
to be in error with the multitude. It 
is probable that he was longer in the 
ministry than, any man of his day in 
the state of Ohio. Commencing his 
labors at eighteen he continued with- 
out cessation seventy-six years; 
preaching his last discourse on the 



32 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



occasion of his 94th birthday in Blan- 
chester, Ohio, in 1905. His eventful 
and useful life terminated October of 
the same year in the evident triumph 
of faith. 



ELIJAH BEEMAN. 

Beeman, Elder Elijah, was bcrn in 
the state of Vermont about year 1781, 
and was the son of Elijah Beeman, 
captain in the Revolutionary war, who 
immigrated from England, and was 
no doubt related to the late Isaac 
Beeman, minister of: the gospel, Cran- 
brook, Kent, England, who was a Par- 
ticular Baptist, and special friend of 
Wm. Huntington. In early life Elder 
Beeman left his native state for New 
York, was married in the year 1800 
to Miss Clarinda Mix, joined the Bap- 
tists in early life and soon became a 
pioneer preacher in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, and in the wilds of what is now 
"Wjest Virginia. He was firmly estab- 
lished in the doctrine of Election and 
Predestination, God's sovereignty and 
salvation by grace. By the providence 
of God his life was short. He died 
October 5, 1823, in his 43rd year, 
while on a preaching tour in Galia 
County, Ohio. 




JEFF F. BEEMAN. 

Beeman, Elder Jeff. F., of Helena, 
Okla., the son of Ariel and Catherine 
(Barry) Beeman, was bom in Warren 
County, O., January 24, 1845. At 
school he was an apt scholar and was 
especially proficiant in mathematics. 
Before he was fifteen he had finished 
Algebra and began the study of geom- 



etry. Soon his health broke down; he 
was reduced to a mere skeleton and 
was given up to die. Up tc this time 
he had — to use his own words, — been 
"a little infidel," but now was made 
to pray for mercy, to see the way of 
salvation and given a sweet hope in 
the Saviour. In this experience he was 
made to feel that he would die, and 
he told his mother he felt so im- 
pressed, sent for many of his friends 
and neighbors to come to see him die; 
but as they would come into the room 
he would begin to preach Jesus to 
them. He got well without the use oi 
medicine, which he had for years de- 
pended upon, and like Paul "confer- 
red not with flesh and blood," but 
united with the church, was baptized 
by Elder J. C. Beeman, October, 1860, 
and began preaching Jesus a few 
months afterwards. But soon he. be- 
came ashamed of his forwardness, 
concluded he was mistaken, aim toi 
years tried to stifle the impression 
within him to preach. This experience 
was bitter, led him to try, Jonah like, 
to run away, hired to a photographer, 
traveled from place to place, landed 
in Chicago, then St. Louis, and in 
this aimless, restless condition, joined 
the army, was sent to the front and 
unhurt passed through the raging bat- 
tles and storms of shot and shell, — ■ 
all the time feeling a condemning con- 
sciousness and yet a faith lhat he 
could not be killed for God had a 
work for him to do. And this was true, 
for God shielded him, brought him 
back home and, after more trials, fin- 
ally to the church. He was ordained 
May 9, 1878, by Elders Thos. Rose and 
Joseph Furr, and has served several 
churches in several states and travel- 
ed considerably among the Baptists. 
He has, since moving to northwestern 
Oklahoma in 1897, organized a church 
near him which he is serving and 
which the Lord is blessing with some 
additions and with peace. 



J. K. BEER. 

Beer, Elder J. K., born November 
19, 1817, at Belleville, Ills., joined the 
Primitive Baptists in the year 1832. 
He was married to Miss Elvira White- 
side, October 3, 1844. He joined the 
church when he was fifteen years old 
and was ordained to preach the gospel 
when he was twenty-seven, and was 
in active service as a minister of the 
gospel for fifty years, and died when 
he was in the ninetieth year of his 
age, at the residence of his only liv- 
ing daughter in Mazon, Ills. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



33 



J. N. BELL. 

Bell, Elder J. N., the subject of this 
notice was born in Pittsylvania Coun- 
ty, Va., about the year 1820, and died 
at his home in Henry County, Va., on 
the 11th day of July, 1892. His parents 
dying when he was quite young, he 
had to provide for his living, which 
he did in a manly way, working and 
living with other people, until he had 
accumulated sufficient wealth to buy 
a farm. His gift and calling was a 
noted one, notwithstanding his liter- 
ary education was cut short to that 
degree that he had to spell the words 
in the Bible in order to read, when 
he first commenced to preach; but 
his knowledge and understanding of 
the Scriptures proved that he had 
been taught in the school of Christ. 
.He preached nearly fifty years, and 
believing that it was by the sweat of 
of the brow that he should eat bread, 
he labored with his own hands for the 
sustenance of the outer man, and was 
a good provider for his family, and 
like our Saviour, was a man of sorrow 
and acquainted with grief, but he 
bore it all with that Christian forti- 
tude that belongs to the Saints of God. 
As a pastor he was ever faithful, feed- 
ing his flock with the divine food 
which the child of God so much needs. 



THOMAS BELL. 

Bell, Elder Thomas, of Wampee, S. 
C. This aged, faithful and highly es- 
teemed minister of! Jesus has for 
many years served as Moderator of 
the Mill Branch Association. He has 
been a preacher of righteousness for 
more than a quarter of a century and 
lives the gospel he preaches. His ser- 
vices have been mostly confined to 
the churhes of the Mill Branch Asso- 
ciation, though he has traveled and 
preached some in other states and 
has been favorably received. The edi- 
tor regrets that sufficient data could 
not be secured for a more extended 
sketch of Elder Bell's useful life and 
labors. 



HARRISON C. BELL. 

Bell, Elder Harrison C, of West 
Salem, Ills., was born in Illinois on 
the 5th day of November, 1839, and 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
in June, 1870, and was ordained to the 
work of the ministry in August, 1873, 



and for many years he proved a faith- 
ful and devoted pastor of churches, 
but a full account ofi his life and la- 
bors could not be obtained. 



WILLIAM E. BELLAMY. 

Bellamy, Elder William E., the sub 
ject of this brief sketch, died at his 
home in Halifax County, N. C, De- 
cember 7, 1895. His membership was 
at Rocky Swamp Church. He was or- 
dained to the full work of the minis- 
try and faithfully served churches un- 
til his death, but a full sketch of his 
life and labors could not be obtained. 



W. R. BELCHER. 

Belcher, Elder W. R., of Mayfield, 
Wash., was born in Tazewell County, 
Va., in 1852, in that portion now Mc- 
Dowell County, W. Va. His father was 
a wicked man and made no profession 
until about the age of seventy. His 
mother was a member of the Primi- 
tive Baptist. He was raised in a back- 
woods country with but few advan- 
tages of an education. Four months 
was the limit of his school days. 
From a small boy he had serious and 
reverential thoughts of God though 
seldom hearing His name only when 
taken in vain. At the age of seventeen 
he was convicted of sin, but it was 
about sixteen years before he united 
with the church. During this period 
he was at times, in much trouble and 
darkness, and experienced the rod of 
God. But in 1885 he was given a 
bright hope in Jesus, united with Elk- 
horn Church, was elected and served 
as clerk for several years, and in 1887 
began preaching Jesus. Three years 
later he was ordained. During the 
past twenty years of his ministry he 
has served several churches, has en- 
gaged in one or two debates with min- 
isters of other denominations, and is 
highly esteemed by his brethren. 



JNO. N. BENBOW. 

Benbow, Elder Jno. N., a native of 
Crenshaw County, Ala., was born 
1840, and died 1906. He joined the 
Primitive Baptists at Harmony, Sep- 
tember, 1875, baptized by Elder O. H. 
P. Cook, and ordained to the full work 
of the gospel ministry October, 1886. 
Elder Benbow was a man of small 



34 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTTST MINISTERS 



pretensions, yet a profound thinkei 
and able exponent of the holy Scrip- 
tures and a strict disciplinarian. He 
was a quiet and peaceable citizen, 
honest and upright in dealing with 
others, and, in that, his moral charac- 
ter Avas above reproach. He was not 
very extensively known among the 
Baptists having traveled but little 
among them at a distance, and hav- 
ing been most of the time of his pub- 
lic ministry afflicted and feeble of 
body. 



NEVILLE BENNETT. 

Bennett, Elder Neville, of North 
Carolina, died at his residence near 
Wadesboro, Anson County, April 6, 
1852, in his fifty-second year of age, 
leaving a wife and twelve children, 
with a very extensive connection and 
a large circle of acquaintances to 
mourn their loss. Elder Bennett was 
a man of great perserverance and was 
a thrifty farmer, and thus by 
economy, prudence and honesty accu- 
mulated a large portion of this 
world's goods. He was distinguished 
for his firmness and integrity both in 
politics and in his religious senti- 
ments. Although rich, he did not 
seem disposed to mind high things 
but condescended to men of low es- 
tate. He was very much noted for his 
readiness of mind and boldness of 
spirit to speak his mind, or give his 
views on any subject he understood, 
whether it was liked or disliked, be- 
lieved or disbelieved by many or few; 
and in this way made manifest that 
he loved the praise of God, more than 
the praise of men; and this he would 
do at all times, and on all occasions 
when it seemed to him to be neces- 
sary, even if he was looked upon as an 
enemy because he told the truth. Yet, 
he was a man of tender and conde- 
scending feeling in a good cause, but 
never was he known to shun the truth 
for the sake of honor, popularity or 
wealth. 



Z. H. BENNETT. 

Bennett, Elder Z. H., the subject of 
this sketch, is a citizen of Florida, 
and now resides near Ormond, but 
was born in Bullock County, Ga., July 
4, 1833. He served in the Civil war 
and proved a faithful soldier. He is 
now engaged in a far more glorious 
war under Jesus as his Captain. 
About the time he united with the 



Primitive Baptists a church was or- 
ganized in his house, out of which 
small beginning the churches of Pil- 
grim' Rest Association have grown. 
Brother Bennett was soon ordained to 
the full work of the ministry and has 
proved a faithful soldier of the Cross. 
He is now in his seventy-fifth year 
and, though feeble in body, is strong 
in mind. For about seventeen years 
he has served as Moderator of Pil- 
grims' Rest and other associations. 




J. L. BENNETT. 

Bennett, Elder J. L., of Barry, Ills. 
The fol'owing regarding Elde.' 
Bennett is quoted from Elder 
Walter Cash's book 1896, for want of 
more recent information. Elder Ben- 
nett "was born in Bainbridge, Chenan- 
go County, N. Y., February 1, 1824 
and united with the Primitive Bap- 
tists in 1840, but two years later join- 
ed the New School Baptists, and lat- 
er began preaching for them. In 1893 
he united with North Fork Church of 
Primitive Baptists, near Paris, Mo., 
and was there ordained to the minis- 
try, and hopes to have a home in the 
church of Christ the remainder of his 
days." 



S, T. BENTLEY. 

Bentley, Elder S. T. This gifted and 
beloved brother is a highly respected 
citizen of Culloden, Ga. Though we 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



35 



have been unable to obtain a full 
sketch of his life and labors, we clip 
the following auto-biography from the 
Primitive Monitor: " I w<w born Jan- 
uary 11, 1845. The fear of God was 
put into my heart while a small child 
which has gone with me through all 
the shifting scenes of life to the pres- 
ent. I was reared by devout Baptist 
parents, my father being a minister 
in the house of God. While quite 
•young I joined the army and served 
over two years in the war between 
the States. The good Lord shielded 
me from the missiles of death and 
permitted me to return home. I mar- 
ried Miss Lizzie Calhoun October 28, 
1867, who has been a helpmeet in- 
deed in all the duties of lifie. I was 
baptized by W. C. Cleveland into the 
Primitive Baptist Church, August, 
1883, and ordained to the ministry 
December, 1885. I have been serving 
with the ability given me from four 
to six churches up to this time, and 
can truthfully say, that I have never 
let anything of a worldly nature stand 
in the way of a ministerial duty. 
When I look back over the past 
twenty-five years and indeed over my 
entire life I can see the Lord's loving 
care in so many ways. Now as I go 
down the hill of life I feel willing to 
trust all to him; willing to do all that 
he affords me health and strength to 
do for His glory and the good of his 
people until the time comes to lay 
aside my armor. Then I hope to be 
carried over the river of death to the 
haven of peace in the city of God." 



SAMUEL BENTLEY. 

Bentley, Elder Samuel, of Georgia. 
From an auto-biography of Elder 
Bentley published in the Gospel Mes- 
senger May, 1884, it is learned thai 
he was born in Wilkes County, June 
7, 181G; married Miss Sarah Carter in 
1838, who bore him nine children and 
was for forty-five years a faithful 
companion. From a child he had se- 
rious thoughts of hell and heaven, life 
and death, and when about fifteen 
years old was convicted of sin and 
during many years following was 
taught by experience the way of life 
and salvation more perfectly. He 
united with Ebenezer Church in 1844 
and was baptized by Elder John Bar- 
ker; was ordained deacon in 1845, and 
in 1856 he was ordained to the gospel 
work by Elders John Dickey, W. C. 
Cleveland and J. P. Lyon. He served 
Bethlehem Church twenty years and 



had the pastoral care of several other 
churches. Whs for several years Mod- 
erator of the Echeconnee Association 
and was a useful and influential min- 
ister. 



JOSEPH BIGGS. 

Biggs, Elder Joseph, of North Caro- 
lina, was born November 12, 1776, ex- 
perienced the pardon of his sins in 
his twenty-fifth year; joined the Meth- 
odist first and preached for them; 
went against conscience three years; 
received a member of the Baptist 
church at Skewarkey 1795 and bap- 
tized by Elder Martin Ross; ordained 
1796; took the pastoral care ofi Flat 
Swamp Church, and during the years 
1802 and 1803 baptized for that 
church over one hundred persons, was 
chosen clerk of the Kehukee Associa- 
tion in 1806, and wrote the Kehukee 
History from 1803 to 1833. He was a 
man of great influence, a gifted 
preacher, and for forty-eight years a 
zealous and faithful laborer in the 
Master's vineyard. He departed this 
life in the full triumph of faith in 
1844 in the seventy-eighth year of his 
age. 




R. A. BIGGS. 

Biggs, Elder R. A., of Santa Anna, 
Texas, was born in Rush County, 
Texas, June 2, 1849. His father, B. F. 
Biggs, was a native of Tennessee; 
grandfather, Asa Biggs, was a native 
of North Carolina, and an Old Bap- 
tist minister. He grew up during the 
civil war, without scarcely any edu- 
cational advantages. At the age of 



36 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



eighteen he was convicted of sin, and 
realized his lost condition and for two 
years was under the burden of guilt 
and condemnation. During this time 
he tried in many ways to keep the law 
and get relief, but in vain. But God 
never brings one in this condition 
without also taking him from, it, and 
so his feet were taken from the mire 
of sin, his goings established, a new 
song put in his mouth even praises to 
God. Jesus was revealed to him as 
his sin bearer and he united with Or- 
chard Gap Church in Collins County, 
and was baptized by Eider J. E. 
Deatherage. The impression to preach 
which he received in his conversion 
and before he joined the church, was 
kept hid as much as possible, but his 
gift was discovered and he was or- 
dained January, 1S80, by Elders W. F. 
Harris and F. Loder. He was soon call- 
ed to the care of four churches and 
served this number almost continual- 
ly until about 1896, when his health 
became so poor that he gave up the 
care of all except his home church. 
This, he serves still, and travels 
among other churches when able. 
December, 1908, he writes: "By the 
grace of God I continue until this day. 
I have never seen any use of depart- 
ing from the 'Old Paths' or of remov- 
ing the 'stakes our fathers have set.' 
So have felt content to be a plain Old 
Baptist. I aspire to nothing higher. I 
want to live with and die in their 
sweet fellowship, the grace of our 
Lord Jesus Christ be with you all." 



G. B. BIRD. 

Bird, Elder G. B., was born in Lin- 
coln County, Wv Va., February 7, 1882. 
United with the Old School Baptist 
Church called Providence of the Pae- 
atalico Association, June, 1900, and 
was baptized the same day by Elder 
J. H. Terry, was licensed to preach 
in June, 1901, at the age of nineteen 
years, and was ordained to the work 
of the gospel ministry May, 1907. 
Elder Bird is now (1908), clerk of 
Providence Church, has the care of 
one church, and is also clerk of Pac- 
atalico Association. 



JOHN BLACKSTONE. 

Blackstone, Elder John, of Georgia, 
was born in Virginia in 1780, on what 
is called "Old Christmas Day." After 
growing up he went to St. Augustine, | 



Fla., and afterwards to Brunswick, 
Ga., and for a time was in the mili- 
tary service at St. Mary's. The next 
account we have of him he was in 
Augusta, Ga., where he became ac- 
quainted with and married Miss Cath- 
erine Harvey, about the year 1799. At 
what time he was received into the 
church among the Baptists I do not 
know, but soon after he joined the 
church, his mind became much 
weighted with preaching the gospel. 
But such was his feeling sense of un- 
worthiness and entire unfitness for 
such a sacred calling, that he shrank 
from it and even said he could not, 
and would not do it. Thinking to get 
rid of such impressians of mind, he 
took his little family and moved firom 
Georgia to East Tennessee, but much 
to his distress and surprise, the im- 
pression increased upon him, even 
while he was vainly striving to sup- 
press and keep it hid from his breth- 
ren and most intimate friends. But aft- 
er struggling along in this state of re- 
bellion for about three years it pleas- 
ed God to sorely afflict him till he 
was reduced to a mere skeleton, and 
physicians, family and friends all 
gave him up to die. And such were 
the trying scenes through which he 
passed that some things would seem 
so incredible he has often been heard 
to say that he did not like to talk 
about them to others, lest they should 
think it mere visionary, or as an idle 
tale, and thereby shake their confi- 
dence in his veracity. And when he 
was brought to the point to feel that 
he must preach or die, he took his 
family and returned to Columbia 
County Ga., and was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry by his home 
church about the year 1808. From 
about this time to 1821 his time ap- 
pears to have been mostly employed 
in preaching in the counties of Co- 
lumbia, Jefferson, Warren and Burke, 
in Georgia. In 1822 he moved to 
Crawford County. Ga., and was soon 
chosen as one of a committee to or- 
ganize the county and locate the 
county site at Knoxville, which was 
named by him. His good sense, quick 
perception, honesty and integrity 
soon won for him the confidence and 
esteem of all who knew him and 
placed him in the front rank as a rep- 
resentative man of his county. He was 
a member of the first Inferior Court 
organized in Crawford Countv, and at 
the first election ever held in the 
county for Representatives to the 
General Assembly, he was chosen by 
the people as their Senator, and so 
well and faithfully did he represent 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



37 



the interests of his constituents, and 
discharge the duties of the responsi- 
ble trust committed to him, that he 
was re-elected annually for nine suc- 
cessive years. But while Elder Black- 
stone was faithful to the best inter- 
ests of his State and county in the 
legislative department, he was faith- 
ful also to his obligations and duties 
as a gospel minister. He assisted in 
organizing several churches, towit: 
Mt. Paran, Salem, Mt. Carmel, Prov- 
idence, Abilene, Union and Old Mt. 
Pisgah, and also assisted in organiz- 
ing the Echeconnee Association. But 
of the many striking incidents in the 
life of this remarkable man, to the 
honor of his memory let it be written, 
that of all the Baptist ministers of 
his day, he was one of the very first 
to discover the corruption introduced 
in Baptist churches and Associations 
by "vain philosophy and the cunning- 
craftiness of men" as manifested in 
the "Modern 'Missionary Institutions," 
which he regarded as being after the 
rudiments of the world, and not after- 
Christ.— Col., ii., 8. As a faithful 
watchman, he sounded the alarm, and 
told the churches what would be the 
result. He boldly met and showed the 
corrupt tendency of the Modern Mis- 
sionary Institutions and Inventions, 
and denounced them as unscriptural 
innovations which would corrupt and 
divide the Baptist denomination. 



ALFRED BLALOCK. 

Blalock, Elder Alfred. This faithful 
soldier of the Cross was born Octo- 
ber 30, 1831; united with Camp Creek 
Church, August. 1853, orda'ned to the 
full work of the gospel ministry De- 
cember 13, 1873, by Elders A. A. Hall 
and D. R. Moore, and was at the time 
of his death, September 5, 1907, pas- 
tor of Camp Creek, Flat River and 
Stories' Creek churches, and Moder- 
ator of the Lower Country Line As- 
sociation. Below is a resolution, in 
part, passed by his home church 
which shows the high regard in which 
he was held: "We the church at Camp 
Creek, Durham County, N. C, assem- 
bled in conference, this 12th day of 
October, 1907, do hereby express our 
grief, and fully realize what a loss 
we have sustained in the death of our 
beloved brother and pastor, Elder Al- 
bert Blalock. Therefore, be it resolv- 
ed, That as a token of friendship and 
brotherly love, which we hope is 
everlasting and stronger than death 
we erect a slab or monument to his 



grave, suitable to the wishes of his 
family, and that our treasurer be in- 
structed to pay for same out of the 
funds belonging to the church." 




ISAAC BLAKELY. 

Blakely, Elder Isaac (1814-1887), of 
Iowa, was born in McMinn County, 
East Tennessee, and united with 
Brush Creek Church, Jefferson Coun- 
ty, Iowa, in the year 1844. He was or- 
dained in Goshen Church, Putnam 
County, Mo., about the year 1851, 
but was living in Iowa, His member- 
ship, at the time of his death, was in 
Fox River Church, of which he was 
pastor for over thirty years. He was 
a pioneer preacher for over forty 
years, and uncompromising in doc- 
trine and practice, and stood high in 
the esteem of his brethren and all 
men. He served one term as repre- 
sentative of his county in the Iowa 
legislature. He died in his seventy- 
third year, after a liSe of useful, faith- 
ful service. 



C. C. BLAND. 

Bland, Elder C. C, of Ayden, N. C. 
This zealous minister of Jesus was 
born in North Carolina July 17, 1846, 
raised by godly parents who taught 
him morality; convicted of sin early 
in life and after much exercise of 
mind as to his sinful condition, was 
given a hope in the Saviour; united 
with Handcock's Church, in Pitt 



38 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



County, N. C, in his seventeenth 
year, and was baptized by Elder Noah 
Adams. He remained out of the 
churcb some years after he had a hope 
in the Saviour and a love for the 
church, because he felt to be too 
young, and so in regard to the subject 




C. C. BLAND 

of preaching he felt he must speak in 
His name, yet felt too young and in 
every way unqualified. In 1864 he 
joined the Southern army and in all 
the dangers of war and hardships of 
prison life, the impression remained 
with him that he must preach Jesus, 
and some years later he was ordained 
and has since been witnessing for the 
Master, and desires to press onward 
and finish his course with joy. 




JOHN T. BLANCHARD. 

Blanchard, Elder John T., of Den- 
nis, Miss., was born in Duplin County, 
N. C., July 31, 1844, but principally 



raised in Mississippi; was brought 
up under the Methodist discipline and 
taught that his soul's salvation was 
dependant upon adhering to the 
wooings of the Holy Spirit. He went 
through the civil war, was severely 
wounded, and attributes his preser- 
vation to the mercies of God. After 
the Avar he married Miss Mattie Ward 
whose mother was a member of the 
Old Baptist Church, and through her 
he heard his first gospel sermon from 
the text, "Am I therefore become 
your enemy because I tell you the 
truth?" But he was at that time too 
stubborn to own the truth. At the age 
of twenty-seven he was convicted of 
sin and then for three years tried the 
effort system to its terminus and 
found it had no balm 1 for a poor sin- 
ner but when he had concluded to ask 
the Lord one time more to have 
mercy and started to the grove to 
pray, God spoke peace to his soul in 
the comforting words, "My grace is 
sufficient for thee." This was his first 
knowledge of salvation by grace. He 
then began to go to hear the Old 
Baptists preach and found them the 
only people who preached his exper- 
ience and what he read in the Bible, 
and he united with them and was 
baptized by Elder J. D. Hudleston in 
1872. The next day he received im- 
pression to preach but fought against 
it for two years. He began preaching 
in May, 1874, and has since had the 
care of churches and has traveled and 
preached in Mississippi, Arkansas, 
Texas, Alabama, Illinois, Indian Ter- 
ritory and Tennessee. He has baptized 
about one thousand persons; has 
served eleven years of his lifie in 
civil office from justice of the peace 
to representative, and is now serving 
as postmaster at Dennis, Miss., and 
has not for twenty-one years touched 
a drop of intoxicating liquors. He has 
the pastoral care of three churches 
and the Lord is blessing his labors. 
He desires to know nothing in his 
preaching but Jesus and Him cruci- 
fied. 



J. M. BLANSETT. 

Blansett, Elder J. M., of Virginia, 
was born in Patrick County, Va., 
March 19, 1834, at the foot of the 
Blue Ridge mountains, about six 
miles above Stuart, and remained 
with his parents until he was about 
twenty-one years of age — laboring on 
the farm, and having but a limited 
chance for an education, only attend- 
ing school about three months. He 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



39 



professed faith in Christ in the year 
1856. In the year 1857 he joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at State 
Line, which belongs to the Mayo As- 
sociation; was licensed by the church 
to preach in 1866, and ordained in 




J. M. BLANSETT 

1867. Soon after this he was called to 
the care of several churches, and for 
twenty years has faithfully served 
them continually every month. For 
many years he has served as Moder- 
ator of the Smith River Association. 



JAMES ELLIS BLANTON. 

Blanton, Elder James Ellis, -was 
born October 9, 1844, in Brooks Coun- 
ty, Ga., moved to Tennessee with his 
parents when a small boy, was raised 
on a farm, received a common school 
education, entered the Confederate 
army at the age of eighteen, and served 
until the close of the war; was mar- 
ried in 1866; joined the church 1873 
and was ordained January, 1888. He 
has served one to four churches con- 
tinuously since ordination; is clerk 
of San Pedro Association and was for 
years associate editor of the Advo- 
cate of Truth. Elder Blanton also 
served four terms in the State legis- 
lature of his native state and is a 
highly respected and honored citizen, 
and a useful and faithful servant of the 
church. 



JAS. H. BLYTHE. 

Blythe, Elder Jas. H., of Orlando, 
Ark., was born in Fulton County, 
Miss., August 9, 1856. His mother was 
a Methodist for twenty-five years, and 



she and his father joined the Baptists 
in their old age, — his Bather being 
seventy years old. Elder Blythe was 
thirteen years old before he heard a 
Baptist sermon, but was impressed 
from his seventh year of age that he 
would some day have to preach. This 
caused him much sorrow. He tried to 
be good while growing to manhood, 
tried to get religion but could not suc- 
ceed, made promises only to break 
them. But in his twenty-first year he 
was unexpectedly and deeply con- 
victed of sin without free-will preach- 
ing or mourners' bench effort. The 
pangs of hell got hold of him. He felt 
to be the chief of sinners and worthy 
of eternal banishment, cursed the day 
he was born and wished he had died 
when young. His conscience and the 
Bible condemned him and he was 
made to realize his "lost condition." 
But God delivered him out of all 
this, revealed Jesus as the sinner's 
Saviour, and gave him a hope in Him. 
Many Scriptures were impressed on 
his mind teaching him the sovereign- 
ty of God and his duty as a believer 
in His salvation. He was led to the 
church, told them what great things 
Jesus had done for him, was received, 
baptized, and after many years of dis- 
obedience went forward in duty and 
was ordained in 1892 by Elders C. 
W. Anderson, C. W. Kirk and H. Sisk, 
and has since had the care of four 
churches almost continually. He is 
strong in the faith of salvation alone 
by the merits of Jesus and desires to 
be found contending for this old time 
honored doctrine that shall stand 
when the world crumbles. 



R. H. BOAZ. 

Boaz, Elder R. H., of Fulton, Ky., 
This faithful soldier of Jesus serves 
churches within the bounds of the 
Bethel Association of Regular Old 
School Baptists and is also Modera- 
tor of this association. Information 
for a more suitable notice could not 
be obtained. 



L. I. BODENHEIMER. 

Bodenheimer, Elder (Dr.) L. I., of 
North Carolina, was one of the most 
unique characters in Central North 
Carolina. Nature had marked him 
well as belonging to the Old School 
and he would be singled out in any 
crowd as a man of extraordinary 
parts. He was both a minister and a 



40 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



physician, which brought him in con- 
tact with people in all the walks of 
life and he always made a strong im- 
pression on all by his marked individ- 
uality and wonderful resources of 
humor and narrative. Dr. Bodenhei- 
mer was born April 6, 1831, about six 
miles east of Salem and was reared 
on a farm. He went to school in his 
boyhood days only three months. He 




L. I. BODENHEIMER 

was married in High Point by Elder 
Wm. Burns August 5, 1S58, where he 
and his family lived until 1867, ex- 
cept at intervals when he was preach- 
ing in remote neighborhoods. He es- 
tablished Zion's Landmark (a leading 
paper of the Primitive Baptist 
Church) at Salem and afterwards pub- 
lished it at High Point. When he re- 
turned to High Point a few years ago 
he published another paper, The 
Naked Truth, but was unable to give 
his time to the business as it required, 
so discontinued the paper and devoted 
his time to the practice of medicine 
and preaching as long as he was 
strong enough. He was a minister for 
fifty years and a physician for thirty- 
five years, pursuing both with remark- 
able energy. Elder Bodenheimer pub- 
lished an interesting account of his ex- 
perience and call to the ministry. He 
was one of the most brilliant and able 
ministers of his day, and many of his 
sermons were published in the Land- 
mark, Naked Truth, and other papers. 
He died at a ripe old age, strong in 
the faith he had so earnestly contend- 
ed for in life. 



STEPHEN BOLANDER. 

Bolander, Elder Stephen, of Illinois, 
was born in Felicity, Clermont County, 
Ohio, and united with the Primitive 



Baptist Church, October 20, 1856. 
He was ordained to the minis- 
try February 15, 1873, and was held 
in high esteem among the churches 
for his wise counsel, but the editor 
could not secure data for a full sketch 
of his life and labors. 



^% 










AMBROSE C. BOOTON. 

Booton, Elder Ambrose C, of Virgin- 
ia. This eminent servant of! God 
was born in the Shenandoah Valley, 
January 26, 1789, and died at his 
home in Page County, March 29, 1865, 
in his seventy-fifth year. He was in 
early life convicted of sin, given a 
hope in the Saviour and united with 
the Baptists in his sixteenth year and 
began preaching in his eighteenth 
year. January 1, 1814 he was ordained 
to all the functions of the gospel min- 
istry and for more than half a centu- 
ry he was numbered among the ablest 
ministers of his day. He was, by pro- 
fession, a school teacher much of his 
life and was noted for his strong 
mind and retentive memory. During 
many years prior to the division in 
the Baptist Church about 1832, when 
Arminian doctrines were being advo- 
cated and new practices being intro- 
duced Elder Booton firmly opposed 
them, and at the time of the separa- 
tion stood firm with the Primitive 
party who began to be called, and still 
are known, as the Old School Bap- 
tists. He lived and died in the faith 
of his fathers, and contended all 
through his long ministry, that the 
New Testament furnished God's peo- 
ple with all needful doctrine and prac- 
tice. And his preaching was not only 
logical but also experimental, and he 
never failed to touch the feeling of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



41 



his auditors if they were acquainted 
with experimental religion. Personal- 
ly, Elder Booton had few, if any, ene- 
mies, but had to meet and contend 
with many enemies of the doctrine he 
preached. And though he contended 
earnestly for the faith once delivered 
to the saints, yet he was of an amia- 
ble disposition and desired to speak 
the truth in love. He was one of the 
pioneer preachers of the Shenandoah 
Valley and served many cnurches in 
the western part of the state during 
his ministry. Blessed with a strong 
mind, a sound body, retentive memo- 
ry, and a heart full of love for the 
cause of Christ, his labors were nu- 
merous, his devotion unselfish, his 
life an influential and useful one. He 
died in the full triumph of faith at a 
ripe old age. 




JOHN K. BOOTON. 

Booton, Elder John K., son of Am- 
brose C. Booton, was born in Page 
County, Va., on August 19, 1823. His 
boyhood days were spent on the Long 
Meadow Farm, on Mill Creek. His ed- 
ucation was received under the noted 
teacher, philosopher and poet, Joseph 
Salyards, at New Market. At an early 
age he displayed ability as a speaker, I 
having made a political address at 
the age of eighteen, which met with 
much commendation. The period of i 
agitation that ushered in the Civil war j 
found him a Colonel of militia, a 
prominent leader in the movement for 
secession, and an orator of great in- 
fluence. He was the organizer of the 
Dixie Artillery, of which he was cap- 
tain until his election to the Confed- 
erate Legislature. His position and his 
fearless declarations of his convic- 



tions made him especially obnoxious 
to the Union forces, and the fact that 
he was a lame man, with many dis- 
tinguishing characteristics made him 
exceptionally liable to detection; but 
although he was forced to endure 
many hardships, he succeeded in 
evading every party detailed to cap- 
ture him and came through the war 
unscarred. The Heavenly Father had 
willed it, however, that his talents 
and intellect should be devoted, in 
the maturer years of his life, neither 
to a military nor a political career, 
but that they should, with all his 
earthly passions, be laid upon the 
Master's altar. In 1850 he was mar- 
ried to Emily Heiskell, daughter ot 
Elder William C. Lauck. Thus the 
son of one mighty father in Israel had 
become the son-in-law of one no less 
mighty; and he in his turn was or- 
dained an elder of the Old School 
Baptist Church in 1870. From this 
time to the end of his days, he devot- 
ed the most of his time to this work 
and entered into its duties with his 
whole heart and soul regardless of 
worldly emolument or any consider- 
ation other than what he deemed to 
be his duty. His was one of those 
cases where the ministry demanded 
a heavy sacrifice of worldly goods and 
ambitions, but he was never known to 
complain. During his ministry he con- 
stituted three churches: Alma, in 
Page County, Cedar Creek, in Fred- 
erick County, and Bentonville, in 
Wjarren County, Virginia. Like his 
father and father-in-law, he was not 
only strong in the doctrine of his 
church, but was appreciated as a 
warm experimental preacher, touch- 
ing the hearts of his hearers. He was 
uncompromising in what he believed 
to be the truth, often having to com- 
bat with those whom he would have 
liked to esteem as brothers. His long- 
est ministerial service was at Battle 
Run, Rappahannock County, Va., 
where he served as pastor thirty 
years. Besides these four named 
churches he also served as pastor of 
Big Spring, Thumb Run, Barrows Run 
and Ground Vine churches. Elder Boo- 
ton was an authority on all questions, 
relating to the history and doctrines 
of his church. His knowledge of! these 
questions, so far as the Virginia Old 
School Baptists are concerned, was 
unequalled. The results of his studies 
were embodied in his valuable book, 
"The Footsteps of the Flock," pub- 
lished a little over a year before his 
death, and full of useful information. 
After thirty-three years of toil in the 
Master's vineyard, on the 19th day of 



42 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



December, 1903, at the age of eighty- 
years and four months, having be- 
stowed his last blessing on his loved 
ones, the venerable minister of the 
gospel fell into a quiet, tranquil and 
painless sleep. It was his oft-express- 
ed desire that his last days should be 
his best, and it was his testimony that 
this desire was granted. Just a few 
months before his death, he made a 
trip to North and South Carolina, 
meeting his brethren in the faith and, 
most of the time, preaching twice a 
day to loving and leverent audiences. 
On his return, he dwelt with joy upon 
this, the last and most delightful la- 
bor of his long ministry. The weight 
of long years and great labors seem- 
ed to have worn him out and merci- 
fully brought about a painless end af- 
ter only a few weeks' illness. No man 
was more tender-hearted and gener- 
ous to those whom he loved. He had 
the courtesy and deference to others, 
the hospitality, the wide information 
the serene spirit rising above the 
petty and selfish things of life, Which 
we associate with our ideal of the 
gentleman of the old school — qualities 
which in him were heightened and 
beautified by a true and humble piety. 




G. W. BOSWELL. 

Boswell, Elder G. W., of Wilson, N. 
C. This devoted and zealous minister 
is the oldest of nine children of Bun- 
yan and Tempy Boswell, and was 
born in Wilson County, August 28, 
1867; convicted of sin about the year 
1878; given a sweet hope in Jesus, the 
following year; impressed with a de- 
sire to unite with the church but for 
two years delayed to do so feeling his 
unworthiness, but was made willing, 



joined Contentnea Church and was- 
baptized by Elder Wm. Woodard Oc- 
tober, 1890. He was soon impressed 
with the duty of 1 preaching and on 
this subject writes: "I prayed the 
Lord to relieve me of that burden. 
The more I prayed for relief the 
heavier the burden grew. I had no ed- 
ucation and poor understanding about 
anything. So here I agreed to die rath- 
er than attempt to preach, and, breth- 
ren. I did die to this world and its 
frowns and was made willing to be 
God's anything. By the mercies of 
God I continue to this day. I hope all 
of God's humble children that read 
this will pray that God may keep me 
by His power until He calls me 
home." He was ordained in 1898 
by Elders Wm. Woodard and 
J. F. Farmer at Scott's Church, which 
church had almost gone down — there 
being but two male members and a 
few sisters that were very old. He 
was called as pastor and there is now 
a membership of about seventy-five. 
He was also called to the care of 
Contentnea, Upper-Black-Creek, and 
Healthy Plains; also serves other 
churches quarterly. Though young in 
the ministry he has baptized — up to 
November. 1908, — 212 persons, preach- 
ed 118 funerals, married 41 couples, 
and assisted in the ordination of sev- 
eral deacons and one minister. Elder 
Boswell was never married but lives 
with his parents and works upon the 
farm when not engaged in ministerial 
duties; is satisfied with the doctrine 
and practice of the apostolic church 
and wishes to stand in the old paths. 



THEODORIA BOUlWARE. 

Boulware, Elder Theodoria, was born 
in Virginia in the early years of the 
eighteenth century, moved to Ken- 
tucky when young; was ordained to 
the work of the ministry in this state 
and was one of the pioneer preachers 
of his day. About 1827 he moved to 
Missouri and was pastor of the church 
in Fulton, Mo., nearly fifty years. He 
taught school about forty years of his 
life and was a successful educator. 
Though he has been dead many years, 
his fame as a gifted, faithful preacher 
of the Old School Baptists still lives, 
and it can be well said of him, "being 
dead he yet speaketh." 



B. E. BOURLAND. 

Bourland, Elder B. E. This faithful 
and worthy brother is a native of Mis- 
sissippi and now lives at Satillo. He 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



43 



was convicted of sin when but a youth 
yet remained out of the church sev- 
eral years awaiting more evidence of 
his sonship. Soon after he united with 
the church he was chosen clerk and 
a few years later was ordained to the 
work of the ministry. He is now the 
beloved pastor of several churches 
and Moderator of the Tombigby As- 
sociation. 



W. A. BOWDEN. 

Bowden, Elder W. A., of Georgia, 
was born in Randolph County, N. O, 
January 26, 1811. His grandfather was 
a minister of the Old School Presby- 
terian order, and his mother's family 
was of the Methodist faith. He was 
early taught to believe that there was 
a God who took cognizance of all he 
did or said; and that his eternal hap- 
piness depended upon the way he 
spent his life here. When about six- 
teen years old, he attended an old- 
fashioned Methodist camp-meeting, 
and while there became alarmed; see- 
ing so many of his comrades seeming- 
ly concerned about their soul's salva- 
tion, and hearing so much preached 
about hell and the torments of the 
damned, became scared, and con- 
cluded that he, too, would get re- 
ligion; — and set in with the determin- 
ed resolution to quit his sinful habits, 
turned to reading the Bible, had his 
secret place to pray, and verily believ- 
ed that he could, and would, get good 
enough for the Lord to love and save 
him. But it pleased the Lord to re- 
veal His truth to him and show him 
the exceeding sinfulness of sin. A 
feeling of gloom and horror seized his 
soul. He viewed himself a poor, lost, 
condemned sinner before a just and 
holy God, against whom he had sin- 
ned so long and so much. Jesus was 
revealed to him as his Saviour. He 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church, July, 1835, and was licensed 
the same year; was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry March, 1837, 
and served churches as pastor forty- 
flour successive years, was clerk of 
Bethel Association thirty-four years, 
and its first Moderator in her organ- 
ization. 



of that church, but at about the age 
of twelve years was "sprinkled" by an 
Episcopal Minister, — the subject not 
realizing in any degree the true or in- 



WILLIAM L. BOWIE. 

Bowie , Elder William L. No. 837 
Shepherd street, N. W., Washington, 
D. C, was born in Wilmington, N. C, 
December 7, 1879, of Presbyterian 
parentage, and reared under the wing 




WILLIAM L. BOWIE 

tended meaning of the work perform- 
ed at that time. Having been taught 
to lead a moral life, and to go to Sun- 
day school and church as a moral 
duty, he took a great pride in being 
better than other boys in the per- 
formance of those things. Having 
these ideals -established, he strove 
to live up to them, in order to 
be honored by his family and elders, 
and to merit the favor of God as he 
thought. At first he thought that his 
life was pleasing to God, but then 
day by day, he began to realize that 
he could not live a day without sin- 
ning. The load of sin, in the constant 
struggle to live perfect before God, 
began to get heavier as the days and 
years went by, when in his eighteenth 
year, it became unbearable longer. It 
was on a public street in Washington 
on a starry night in August, 1897, 
when his soul was crying out for 
mercy, that the burden of sin seemed 
to be lifted from his soul. That mo- 
ment he will never forget. He then 
however, went on endeavoring to find 
a home. He had never known an Old 
Baptis/,. He finally united with the 
Episcopal Church in Washington, D. 
C, became a "candidate for the min- 
istry," lay-reader, and Sunday school 
superintendent. And he has a sympa- 
thetic feeling for the many children of 
God that he believes are being led by 
false teachers. He went to board 
with a strange family in Fauquier 
County, Va., in the summer of 1900. 
That family proved to be the first Old 
Baptists he had ever met. He heard 



44 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



them for the first time, enjoyed 
their preaching conversation and 
association, and was made to feel 
they preached the truth as it is in 
Jesus, and by faith in Him the fet- 
ters of the law were broken, hope 
sprang up and he was enable to re- 
joice in a finished salvation, professed 
publicly this sweet hope and was bap- 
tized by Elder Charles H. Waters into 
the fellowship of the Old chool 
Baptist Church of Washington, D. C, 
in April, 1902, and in October, 1903, 
he was ordained to the full work of 
the gospel ministry by Elders Charles 
H. Waters and J. A. Norton. Since 
that time he has served Davis Church 
in Carroll County, Md., and White 
Oak Church in Virginia, and has labor- 
ed some among other churches of the 
Ketocton and Ebenezer Associations. 
He is at present stationed in Mont- 
gomery, Ala., being in the special ex- 
amination service of the United 
States Pension Bureau as Special Ex- 
aminer, but his home is in Washing- 
ton, D. C. On January 1, 1902, he was 
married to Miss Maud Zirkle, and 
they have three children to gladden 
their hearts and brighten their home. 




W. J. D. BRADFORD. . 

Bradford, Elder W. J. D., of Killen, 
Texas, The subject of this sketch 
was born in Berrian County, Ga., 
May 4, 1862. His father, Wim. W. 
Bradford, was killed in the battle of 
Cold Arbor, June 3, 18G4, and nis 
mother, whose maiden name was 
Mary C. Peeples, was left with four 
young children to care for. This, with 
other misfortunes, reduced her to 
poverty and Elder Bradford was not 



given the advantages of an education. 
Early in life he moved to Texas and 
in his eighteenth year was convicted 
of sin, and for some years was bur- 
dened with a feeling sense of con- 
demnation. But God gave him a hope 
in Jesus and love for His people and 
about 1885 under the preaching of 
Elder T. iS. Dalton who was visiting 
churches in Texas, he united with the 
church and was baptized by Elder J. 
B. Downing. He was in 1895 ordained 
deacon, and in 1903 was ordained to 
the functions of the gospel ministry 
by Elders A. V. Atkins, J. S. Newman, 
W. L. Norman, E. R. Robinson and S. 
A. Paine. Elder Bradford has since 
had the care of three to four churches 
and is zealous and faithful in the 
cause. He writes: "I feel that the 
heaviest load I have to carry is a 
feeling sense of my own imperfec- 
tions." 



S. H. BRADY. 

Brady, Elder S. H., of North Caro- 
lina, died November 27, 1903, age 
sixty-one years, ten months and sev- 
enteen days. He united with Old 
Union Church, Johnston County, N. 
C, November, 1868, and some years 
afterward was ordained to the minis- 
try. He was a dutiful son, a brave sol- 
dier, a good citizen, and was one of 
the most humble men, ever showing 
that lamb-like principle. When he was 
reviled he reviled not again. He was 
a good neighbor, never failing to do 
any kindness that he could and for 
any person. Nothing ever gave him 
greater pleasure than an opportunity 
to help one of God's little ones, show- 
ing how he loved to be at the feet of 
the brethren. He was seldom known to 
miss an opportunity of meeting the 
people of God very often using these 
words: "One day in the house of my 
God is better than a thousand." For 
several years before his death he had 
been afflicted, but bore his suffering 
patiently and died as he had lived — 
trusting alone in Jesus for salvation. 



J. W. BRADLEY. 

Bradley, Elder J. W., of Goldsberry, 
Mo. The following information of Eld- 
er Bradley is from Elder Walter 
Cash's book of portraits published 
1896, and is used for want of more 
recent information: Elder Bradley 
"was born in Macon County, Mo., Octo^ 
ber 14, 1845, and united "with Brush 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



45 



Creek Church, Douglas County, Mo., 
May, 1880. He was ordained in Brush 
Creek Church, Macon County, Mo., 
where his membership now is, Decem- 




J. W. BRADLEY 

ber 7, 1890, and has since served as 
pastor of churches, having charge of 
three at present, to which he gives a 
faithful attendance." 



J. W. BRAGG. 

The editor not being able to get 
data from which to prepare a sketch 
of Elder Bragg, quotes the following 
brief notice of his life and labors from 
Elder Potter's Souvenir Book of 1905: 

"Bragg, J. W., of Newmarket, Ala. 
was born in Madison County, Ala., on 
the 11th day of November, 1848, and 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
in September, 1866, and was ordained 
to the work of the ministry in Octo- 
ber, 1869, and is now pastor of four 
churches." 



GRAY BRANNON. 

Brannon, Elder Gray, was born 
1845, and died November 22, 1896. He 
was a great sufferer, but bore his 
afflictions with great patience and 
resignation to the will of Almighty 
God. constantly praying that the 
Lord's will be done. He was received 
and baptized into the fellowship of 
the Primitive Baptist Church called 
Timber Ridge ,and was soon ordained 



to the gospel ministry. Elder Brannon 
was well esteemed among men, and 
had a good report of them that are 
without; was a kind and affectionate 
husband, a loving father and a wortny 
citizen. 



E. M. BRANSON. 

Branson, Eider E. M., of Zenda, 
Kan., was born October 9, 1839, in An- 
derson County, Tenn.; professed hope 
in Christ in July, 1856; joined the 
church at Hind's Creek, Union Coun- 
ty, Tenn., in November, 1856, and was 
baptized by Elder Isaac Gentry; com- 
menced preaching about 1873, and 
was ordained in 1874. He has visited 
and preached in portions of Tennes- 
see, Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, 
Missouri, Nebraska and Kansas. This 
good brother writes me in the follow- 
ing language: "I have at all times 
tried to keep myself small. I have 
been a member of the church fifty-two 
years and have always desired to 
make a good member. I have never 
believed to join something' else would 
be of any benefit to me. I am now in 
my sixty-ninth year of age, and if I 
can, I want to finish my course in this 
life, a plain, old fashioned, Baptist. I 
have never had a charge against me 
by any church. I know it will not be 
long before the churches will be 
without me and I think I can see 
clearly that they can get along well 
enough witnout me, but it seems like 
I could not do without the {fellowship 
of my brethren and sisters while I 
live in this world." Thus, dear read- 
er, you can see in such an humble 
walk and Godly conversation, the 
fruits of the doctrine of grace in the 
heart. 



WM. T. BRANSON. 

Branson, Elder Wm,. T., of Reliance, 
S. Dak., was born in Harrison County, 
Iowa, June 25, 1866, united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Loveland 
in 1887, was ordained in 1889, and now 
(1908) is residing at Reliance, S. D. 
He has served several churches in 
Iowa and Indiana; has assisted in or- 
ganizing three churches, has traveled 
considerably among the Baptists, es- 
pecially in the West and is supposed 
by some to be the first Old School 
Baptist minister to preach in South 
Dakota. Elder Branson has been a 
very useful man and has had a spe- 
cial impression to travel in the waste 
places to hunt up and feed the flock 



46 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



of God. He has gone forth in this 
work as Phillip, Paul and others of 
God's called servants — being impress- 
ed by dreams, visions and otherwise, 




WM. T. BRANSON 

and has realized his Master's promise 
true that He will be with His people 
alway, even unto the end. Such are 
God's humble, faithful servants, — the 
only Bible 'Misionaries extant. 




FRANKLIN P. BRANSCOME. 

Branscome, Elder Franklin P., son 
of John and Mary Francis (Mayberry) 
Branscome, of Laurel Fork, Carroll 
County, Va., was born March 14, 1SG0, 
in the county of his present residence. 
His father -was made a prisoner of 
war at the battle of Missionary Ridge, 
November, 18G3, and sent to Rock 



Island prison, where he died of fever. 
His mother was unable to educate 
him and he entered school at the age 
of sixteen years, not knowing any- 
thing of letters, except the names of 
the characters forming the Roman al- 
phabet, and could not even spell 
words of one syllable. He was the "big 
boy in the little class." But notwith- 
standing the embarrassing conditions 
he went to work in earnest, and in a 
most thorough manner. In the way of 
advancement those who were far in 
advance of him at the outset, were 
soon passed by and left behind; and 
he finally became their teacher. In all, 
he attended school only four sessions 
of three months each. He had nine 
months vacation each year, aurmg 
wh4ch time one or more of his text- 
books were with him continually; 
and every day and everywhere he was 
drawing from them knowledge. While 
his hands were too busy to hold an 
open book, his mind was working over 
what he had read and storing away, 
for future use, the finished thoughts. 
He did not study without an aim in 
life, nor labor to finish a lesson as a 
slave would to end a task; for he 
was digging after knowledge, just as 
the owner of a mine would delve for 
gold, knowing that all the gold found 
would be his own. October 5, 1881, he 
was married to Miss Orlena E. Mar- 
shall, daughter of, Deacon Daniel W. 
Marshall. His wife who is a Primi- 
tive Baptist, and his nine children, 
who are strictly moral and honorable, 
are all living and in good health. 
From November, 1881, till March, 
1893, he was engaged in the public 
schools of Virginia as teacher. While 
teaching he studied surveying and be- 
came the court's surveyor, holding 
the office for eight years. Beside this 
he did much work under orders from 
the United States' Court, and by it 
was commissioned to determine and 
settle a number of difficult contro- 
versies. He has held the office of 
notary public for twenty-four years, 
and other positions of trust imposed 
by those among whom he was born, 
raised and lives . In 1S44, having, 
through reigning grace, received a 
good hope in Christ, he united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church, at Pan- 
ther Creek. Just one year later he 
made his first attempt to preach the 
unsearchable riches of Christ our Re- 
deemer. At the same time the next 
year (1886) he was licensed to preach 
wherever God in His providence 
should cast his lot; and, in October, 
1887, he was ordained to the full func- 
tions of the gospel ministry. He is 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



47 



now, and has been for a number of 
years serving two churches as pastor, 
and in these and other churches has 
baptized about one hundred persons. 
January, 1897, he founded the "Mes- 
senger of Truth," which he has since 
edited and published. January, 1909, 
the paper entered upon its thirteentn 
year. Elder Brascom's paper and 
preaching has done much toward 
building up and keeping the churches 
in the unity of the faith and in the 
bonds of peace. He is an earnest and 
zealous abvocate for the simplicity of 
Bible doctrine, contending that it 
contains a precept and example of all 
that we should believe, practice and 
teach religiously. Practical godliness 
is an important feature of his walk 
and teaching. He uses no jesting, nor 
foolishness in the pulpit; and con- 
tends that the spirit of Jesus in the 
preacher will humble him (the 
preacher), and bring him into a frame 
to speak serious words of soberness 
and truth. He is the assistant clerk 
of the New River Primitive Baptist 
Association. 



third year in the full triumphs of 
faith. Data for a full sketch of his 
useful life could not be obtained. 




PETER L. BRANSTETTER. 



Branstetter Elder Peter L. (1825- 
1890), of Missouri, was born in P'^e 
County, Ky., February 11, 1825. He 
joined the church at the age of nine- 
teen and was ordained to the ministry 
in 1864. He commenced his education 
after he was married, and became one 
of the foremost defenders of the Prim- 
itive Baptist church, being a very 
forcible speaker. He died in his sixty- 



A. B. BREES. 
Brees, Elder A. B., of Spencerville, 
O., was born in Michigan December 
30, 1841, convicted cf sin in early life, 
blessed with a hope in Jesus and 
united with Fairfield Church in 1863, 
which church had the pastoral ser- 
vices of Elder John Fisher, a Holand 
dutchman who came to America and 
first united with the New School Bap- 
tist Church and afterwards leaving 
them and joining the Old School Bap- 
ists in New York state. Elder Breese 
was ordained October 8, 1869, and 
was soon called to serve Deerfield 
Church but in a short time moved to 
the neighborhood of his present home 
where he has the care of one church. 




GEO. A. BRETZ. 

Bretz, Elder Geo. A., of Huntington, 
Ind., was born December 7, I860, in 
Ionia County, Mich.., and grew up in 
Ohio. In his youth he had much 
thought about himself, his sins, and 
the future state. When seventeen 
years of age he became acquainted with 
th Bible doctrine that he was by na- 
ture and practice, a sinner. After near- 
ly two years of consant soul sorrow 
he was given a sweet hope in Jesus, 
and a view of God's plan of salvation, 
and in 1890 united with the church. 
Four years later he was ordained to 
the full work of the gospel ministry 
and has had the care of four churches 
most of the time since, besides travel- 
ing considerably among other 



48 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



churches. Elder Bretz came from a 
Baptist family. His grandmother was 
a Virginian, and one of his ancestors 
was put in prison in that state for 
"preaching the gospel contrary to 
law." His wife — a true companion to 
him — united with the church when a 
little girl about eleven years old. Eld- 
er Bretz is a lovely man and com- 
forting preacher, and desires to 
know nothing in his preaching but 
"Christ and Him crucified." He is a 
lover of peace in Zion and content 
with the good old way and his labor 
has been unifying, edifying and 
strengthening to the Lord's people. 
He has for many years been asso- 
ciate editor of the Primitive Monitor 
and is a clear and fluent writer, an 
able preacher and greatly loved by 
the churches ofi his care. 



J. B. J. BRICKEY. 

Brickey, Elder J. B. J., of Georgia, 
was born April 16, 1845, and died 
January 25, 1905. He professed faith 
in Christ, and joined Lhe Primitive 
Baptist Church in Tuckaleechee Cove, 
in 1869, and was baptized by Elder 
Absalom A. Abbott, and came out ot 
the water preaching; was ordained 
to the full work of the gospel minis- 
try October, 1871, by Elders A. A. Ab- 
bott and Henry Franklin, as presby- 
tery, and was soon called to the care 
of churches and preached faithfully 
to from two to four churches all his 
life. At the time of his conversion the 
Tennessee Association seemed to be 
nearly gone down, the churches few 
in number, and but few members in 
the churches, and he seemed to be 
the right man in the right place, and 
at the right time. His labors were 
wonderfully blessed. The churches 
were soon built up. New churches 
were organized under his labors, and 
mightily grew the word of God. He 
wrote a circular letter in 1870, show- 
ing the difference between the mis- 
sionaries and the old Baptists, and 
the old Tennessee Association heart- 
ily indorsed the letter, and printed it 
in their minutes of that year. Soon af- 
ter this the missionaries challenged 
him for a debate, -which was accepted, 
which resulted in some of those who 
had been reared missionaries uniting 
with our people, stating that the de- 
bate convinced them who was right, 
and lived and died old Baptist preach- 
ers. He was good, gentle and kind. 
His sermons were weighty and im- 
pressive, and other denominations 



would go for miles to hear him 
preach. His last words were: "All is 
bright; all is glorious; my room is 
filled with angels, and glory," and 
passed away without a struggle. 



JOHN S. BRINSON. 

Brinson, Elder John S. (1812-1883), 
of North Carolina was the seventh 
son of John and Susanah Brinson. He 
was received into fellowship by the 
church at Milton, Palmlico County, 
(formerly Craven County.) by baptism 
in 1851, and was licensed by said 
church to exercise his ministerial 
gift January, 1854. The church ap- 
proving of his ministerial qualifica- 
tions, he was regularly ordained to 
the work of the gospel ministry Jan- 
uary, 1855. After the death of Elder 
James Griffin he was chosen pastor of 
the church at Milton, the duties of 
which office he faithfully discharged 
till the day of his death. During the 
term of his ministry he served at one 
time as m\any as four or five churches 
as occasional pastor, and they situated 
120 miles apart east and west, and 
50 miles apart north and south. As 
to the zeal, ability, faithfulness and 
perseverance with which he discharg- 
ed the duties of his office those he 
served are the most competent judges. 
He was faithful and studied to sho-w 
himself approved unto God, a work- 
man that needed not to be ashamed, 
rightly dividing the word of truth and 
giving to each his portion in due sea- 
son. He was considered able in the 
ministry and gospel discipline by the 
Baptists generally throughout the 
eastern part of the State, and it seem- 
ed to give him pleasure to give ad- 
vice to his younger brethren in re- 
gard to proper church discipline when- 
ever asked. One thing was very no- 
ticeable — the churches under his care 
lived peaceably and in brotherly love, 
disturbances of any kind seldom, ever 
slipping in to mar their peace. 



W. T. BROADWAY. 

Broadway, Elder W. T., of North Car- 
olina was born September 28, 1852; 
convicted of sin when about thirty- 
one years of age, and after much 
soul sorrow was given a hope in the 
Saviour and united with the Baptists 
November, 1883. Soon he was burden- 
ed with the duty of preaching Jesus 
to others, and was, in dreams and in 
other ways, impressed with a feeling 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



49 



sense of his duty. But for about thir- 
teen years he was disobedient and 
received the chastenings of the Lord. 
In August, 1896, he was licensed to 
preach and in November the same 
year was ordained to the full work of 
the ministry. He was soon chosen to 
the pastoral care of five churches, 
viz: Salisbury church, Pine, Tom's 
Creek, Rock Hill and Gains Grove, 
and has proven a faithful, zealous 
pastor. Elder Broadway is loved by 
his people, is strong in the faith and 
practice of the apostolic church, and 
desires to be found contending for 
those things that become sound doc- 
trine and which tends to build up the 
broken walls of Zion. 




ARCHIE BROWN. 

Brown, Elder Archie, of Fort 
Branch, Ind. This gifted and zealous 
minister, -was born in White County, 
Ills., January 5, 1859. When quite 
young he often thought about death 
and eternity, and intended to get re- 
ligion when older. He concluded it 
would not require much of an effort 
for he felt that he was not very bad. 
But one evening when about fifteen 
years of age, in the field all alone, he 
was convicted of sin and for about 
two years was made to feel he was 
growing worse and worse until hell 
seemed to be his portion, but at this 
point of man's extremity was God's 
opportunity. He was given a hope in 
Jesus as his Saviour, his burden was 
gone and a new song put in his 
mouth even praise unto God. He loved 
the church and desired to join but felt 
too unworthy. He was, however, soon 
made to feel that Jesus was his 



worthiness, united with Little Wabash 
Church, February, 1877, and was bap- 
tized by Elder David Stewart. Four 
years later he began preaching and 
was in August, 1883, ordained to the 
full functions of the gospel, since 
which time he has had the care of 
from one to four churches, and be- 
sides, has traveled considerably 
among the Baptists in many states. 
He was also, for several years, prior 
to Elder Lemual Potters' death, asso- 
ciated with him in the publication of 
the Church Advocate as joint editor 
and proprietor, and as a writer was 
noted for his simple, clear style. But 
whether in the pulpit or the editor's 
chair Elder Brown has always oppos- 
ed the progressive spirit among our 
people, nor has he ever been accused 
of not preaching Jesus as a complete 
Saviour. He concludes that if the doc- 
trine and practice of the apostolic 
church is perfect and we begin to pro- 
gress along these lines, we go back- 
ward instead of forward. He has bap- 
tized into the fellowship of his church 
about three hundred persons and the 
Lord has blessed his labors to the 
comfort, edification and instruction of 
many. In 1879 he was married to Miss 
Lucy Potter, a daughter of Elder Lem- 
uel Potter, and this union has been 
blessed with four sons. Elder Brown 
writes: "My only hope for a better 
place than this is in Christ, and yet 
sometimes I feel that it is unreasona- 
ble for a poor sinner like I am to even 
claim a hope in the dear Saviour." 




W. 



BROWN. 



Brown, Elder W. T., of Richmond, 
Mo., son of Thos. A. Brown, who was 
for over forty years deacon in New 



50 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Hope Church, was born October 7, 
1847. He was blessed with good moral 
taining, but had but few opportuni- 
ties for receiving an education; was 
raised on a farm and has since fol- 
lowed this vocation when not engaged 
in ministerial work; was married to 
Miss Sarah E. White, December 6, 
1866; convicted of sin in the Spring 
of 1867, and for one and a half years 
was made to feel the wrath and con- 
demnation of Sinai's law; was given a 
sweet hope in Jesus, and in July, 

1869, united with the church and was 
that day told by some of his brethren 
that he would have to preach which 
greatly frightened him, — his brethren 
having discovered the gift that he had 
before felt in his heart though endeav- 
ordered to keep it hid. He began, in a 
few months, to speak publicly in the 
name of Jesus and was in November, 

1870, ordained to the work of the minis- 
try by Elders Jas. Duva 1 , Isaac Odell 
and Allen Sisk. Elder Brown has since 
had the care of two to four churches 
and has traveled and preached in Illi- 
nois, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Okla- 
homa, Texas, California, Idaho, Oregon 
and Washington, and has been well re- 
ceived among the Baptists. He firmly 
believes that the preaching of the doc- 
trine of free, sovereign, efficient and 
effectual grace for all the elect and 
the practice of the New Testament 
teaching will not cause strife and di- 
visions among the dear people of God. 
He has fought a good fight thus far 
and desires to finish his course along 
the same line he has been pursuing 
nearly forty years. 



unto the saints for more than fifty 
years, and died in the full triumphs of 
that faith in his eighty-ninth year of 
age. 



WILLIAM BROWN. 

Brown, Elder William, was born in 
Rowan County, N. O, on the 8th day 
of November, 1794, and died at his 
home in Johnson County, N. O, on the 
11th day of July, 1884. His last ser- 
mon was preached at Cross Roads 
Church from I John 3:1, "Behold, 
what manner of love the Father hath 
bestowed upon us, that we should be 
called the sons of God: therefore the 
world knoweth us not, because it knew 
him not.' He was the pastor at Union, 
Bethany and Juniper churches for 
many years, and was faithful, being a 
partaker of the afflictions of the gos- 
pel, and knowing in whom he had be- 
lieved, and was persuaded that God 
was able to keep that which he had 
committed unto Him against that day. 
As a minister he was faithful and con- 
tended for the faith once delivered 



JOHN W. BROWN. 

Brown, Elder John W. (1825-1875)— 
of Onslow County, N. C, the son of 
Im. and Olive Brown, was convicted 
of sin in his twelfth year and several 
years later was gTven a hope in Jesus 
and directed to the Primitive Baptist 
Church, which he joined; was socn 
licensed to preach and in 1860 was 
ordained to the gospel work. He trav- 
eled tnrough heat and cold, day and 
night, to preach salvation by grace to ■ 
a dying world, and to teach man's 
accountability to his God, and to warn 
poor sinners to flee from the wrath 
to come. His manner of preaching was 
with such great power it attracted the 
attention of old and young; so as a 
general thing he had large congrega- 
tions to preach to. Elder Brown first 
married Emily Caneday, by whom he 
had six sons. After the death of his 
first wife he broke up house-keeping 
and scattered his children, and re- 
mained without a wife until 1863 
when he was married to Eliza Hill. 
This union was blessed with three 
sons and one daughter. He fought a 
good fight and finished his course 
with joy. 



JESSE BROWN. 

Brown, Elder Jesse, was born in 
Duplin County, N. C, on September 
30, 1846, and when but a child lost 
both father and mother by death. He 
became greatly troublbed on account 
of sin in 1875 and felt to be lost and 
without hope, but about 1879 the Lord 
appeared to him as his redeemer. 
Then the praise of the Lord was his 
joy and he joined the Primitive Bap- 
tists and was baptized in 1880, and' 
began to preach Jesus in 1886, and 
was ordained to the full work of the 
ministry, at Sandy Bottom, Lenoir 
County, N. C, in 1888. He is yet in 
the service, having care of churches 
in North Carolina. Elder Brown is a 
man of deep thought and an able 
speaker. 



W,M. M. BRYAN. 

Bryan, Elder Wm. M., was born 
December 30, 1842, in Georgia and 
died at Clayton, Texas, January 17, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



51 



1904. He joined Pleasant Hill Church 
in Georgia July 26, 1873, and was or- 
dained to the full work of the minis- 
try at Emmaus Church in the Fellow- 
ship Association in Alabama, 1891. 
He moved to Eastern Texas January 
5, 1893, and served the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church of Christ near Clayton, 
called Mt. Moriah, as pastor until 
death. He was a kind husband, ruling 
over his house gently, with a Christ- 
like spirit of love. He proved his call- 
ing of God by ruling his house well 
and knowing how to take care of the 
house of God. He lived a faithful, 
sober life, providing things honest in 
the sight of all men. He said upon his 
death-bed: "I am proud to die in the 
faith I have lived in — the 'faith once 
delivered unto the saints." 



W. C. BRYAN. 

Bryan, Elder W. C, was born in 
Barber County, Ala., on August 4, 
1838, and he fell asleep in Jesus on 
February 28, 1901. He moved to Floyd 
County, Ga., in 18G8, and bought a 
farm five miles west of Rome, Ga., 
where he lived for several years. He 
served as justice of the peace in that 
district many years. He received a 
hope in Jesus when young, but from 
a feeling of unworthiness he did not 
join the church until June 27, 1873, 
when he and his companion both were 
received into the fellowship of the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Pleasant 
Hill, Floyd County, Ga., and were 
baptized by Elder L. C. D. Payne. 
Elder Bryan was ordained deacon 
November 21, 1874. He was licensed 
to preach in 1882 and was ordained De- 
cember 6, 1884, by Elders L. C. D. 
Payne A. Johnson, F. M. Casog and A. 
Maples. Since that time he has served 
from three to five churches, and was 
ever a pompt, faithful minister. He 
seemed to have the cause at heart, and 
his duty to the church always came 
first. The following are the churches he 
has served: Emmaus and Melville, 
Chattanooga County, Ga. ; Pleasant 
Hill, Midway, and Rockdale, of Floyd 
County, Ga. ; Rocky Creek and Mt. 
Horeb, Gordon County, Ga. ; Provi- 
dence, Cherokee County, Ala., and 
West Atlanta Church. He served as 
clerk of the Euharlie Association from 
1884 up to his death. He was also 
elected twice to the legislature in 
Floyd County, Ga. The positions he 
has so faithfully filled show that he 
was a very useful citizen. He was 
highly esteemed and will be greatly 
missed. 



THOMAS BUCK. 

Buck, Ettler Thomas, was born 
about 1750 at what is now known as 
Bucktown, Warren County, Va., and 
died 18G2. He was a grandson of 
Chas. Buck, the first of the name who 
settled in the valley west of the Blue 
Ridge. He entered the ministry early 
in life, and served the Master in that 
work the whole of a long life. He was 
a man of strong character, a conscien- 
tious Christian devoted to his work, 
and was called "Father Buck" by the 
younger generation of his locality, 
and was one of the most prominent 
of the ministers in his part of the 
state. He preached for years at the 
Old School Baptist Church at Water 
Lick, Nineveh and Front Royal. He 
was known and beloved through all 
the bounds of the Ketoctan Associa- 
tion as one who manfully "contended 
for the faith;" and is still quoted as 
an authority upon subjects connected 
with the tenents of the church. 



W. M. BULLARD. 

Bullard, Elder W. M. This humble 
and faithful servant of the Master, 
was born in Macon County, Ga., Janu- 
ary 13, 1860. His parents were poor 
in this world's goods, and were not 
able to give him an education. Yet he 
was determined to educate himself, 
and by hard study and God's blessings, 
has made himself a well informed 
man. At the age of fourteen he receiv- 
ed a severe injury in the shoulder, in 
working around some machinery. He 
united with the Bethel Church, in 
Phenix City, Ala., June, 1887, bap- 
tized by Elder J. S. Boxley, and serv- 
ed as clerk and deacon, and later was 
ordained to the full work of the gos- 
pel ministry, and served the church as 
pastor. Brother Bullard was ordained 
June, 1897, and has served from two 
to four churches since. He is much 
beloved by his people, and his home 
church now numbers over a hundred 
in fellowship. 



BALAS BUNDY. 

Bundy, Elder Balas, of New York, 
was born April 15, 1828, in Otego, Ot- 
sego County, N. Y. He received a hope 
in Christ in 1852, and united with the 
New School Baptist Church in Otego. A 
few years after he became so dissatis- 
fied with the doctrine and order of that 
church that he with a few others, sep- 



52 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



a rated from it, and organized "The 
Old School Baptist Church of Otego," 
where the doctrine and order of the 
gospel has been maintained ever 
since. In 1S71 Elder Silas H. Durand 
was called to the pastoral care of the 
church. Balas Bundy had then been 
exercised in regard to the work of 
the ministry about nine yeais, and 
had persistently resisted the impres- 
sion. During that year his opposition 
was overcome. Having long been dis- 
satisfied with his baptism, regarding 
it as not in the order of the gospel, 
because he was not at the time in fel- 
lowship with the one who administer- 
ed the ordinance, he asked of the 
church that the ordinance might be 
administered, and he was baptized by 
Elder Durand October 5, 1871. He was 




BALAS BUNDY 

ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry May 8, 1873, and soon after ac- 
cepted the call of the church to be 
pastor, and remained in that relation 
till his departure. May 29, 1899, faith- 
fully performing his duties in the 
church and in the world. The last 25 
years of his life he traveled much, 
preaching in many different churches, 
and was well known in the eastern 
states and Canada, There was but one 
opinion and one voice among all the 
lovers of truth who knew him con- 
cerning the gift that was in him, that 
it was most rich and precious and 
valuable, and that it was constantly 
stirred up and in exercise for the 
comfort of the Lord's afflicted and 
poor people. He seldom wrote for 
publication, and but little privately, 
but most precious fruit was constant- 
ly falling from his lips, not alone 
when in the pulpit, but wherever and 
whenever he spoke, and it was evi- 



dently "the fruit of the lips" which 
the Lord creates. Isa. 57: 19. He was 
very spiritually-minded, and not at all 
given to levity in his life or conver- 
sation. His estimation of himself and 
his gift was very low, and he could 
hardly dare to speak of himself as a 
preacher. But the sweetness and rich- 
ness of his gifts were most wonder- 
ful to his brethren, and he was most 
highly esteemed for his clear view of 
doctrine and order, and his faithful- 
ness. 



H. S. BUNSON. 

Bunson, Elder H. S., was born June 
13, 1821, united with the church at 
Opeka 1850, ordained 1866, and after 
a quarter of a century of faithful serv- 
ice, died at his post August 16, 1903. 
So great was his love for the cause of 
Christ that though a cripple from white 
swellings and almost blind, and poor 
in this world's goods, yet for years he 
would often walk twenty miles through 
any kind of weather to meet his ap- 
pointments, and while he never spoke 
with enticing words of man's wisdom 
or excellence of speech; yet he was 
an interesting speaker and often held 
his audience for two hours. While he 
was bold as a lion yet he was also as 
harmless as a dove, always bowing in 
humble submission to his brethren as 
long as their faith and practice was 
according to the Scripture, but would 
fellowship no discord. He main, 
tained a Godly walk and pious conver- 
sation, and was well beloved as a 
neighbor and minister. His 'ast ad- 
monition was to contend for the faith 
and never to yield to the enemies of 
the church, and that he felt he had 
fought a good fight; that he had kept 
the faith and was ready to depart and 
be with his Lord. 



JAS. A. BURCH. 

Burch, Elder Jas A., of North Caro- 
lina, was born in Person County, N. C, 
August 24, 1829. He professed a hope 
in Christ and united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Wheeler's, in Per- 
son County N. C, 1856, and was bap- 
tized by Elder A. N. Hall, who was 
pastor of said church, and was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry on 
December 2, 1871, by a presbytery 
composed of Elders A. N. Hall, D. R. 
Moore, and James S. Dameron. He 
lived the upright life, and his fruit in 
his daily life was such as the grace of 
God manifests in His children. The 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



53 



war between the States commenced, 
and he volunteered March 4, 1862, was 
elected First Lieutenant of Company A, 
Fiftieth Regiment, North Carolina 
Troops, and served as such to the sec- 
ond of December, 1862. He was then 
promoted to Captain of the same com- 
pany and served as such until the 26th 
of April, 1865, and surrendered with 
the army at Greensboro, N. C. He was 
loved by his company and preserved 
in the Providence of God with his 



22, 1895, and has since had the care 
of churches. He is well established in 




JAS. A. BURCH 

command, had the respect and confi- 
dence of his superior officers and re- 
turned home clothed with his char- 
acter unspotted. As a minister he was 
faithful and his labors were blessed 
and the churches prospered and in- 
creased in numbers under his care. 
He was a good peace-maker, and lab- 
ored to keep peace in the churches. 
He traveled much in North Carolina. 
Tennessee, Alabama and Virginia. He 
fought a good fight, finished his course 
and breathed his last at home near 
Burlington, on April 12, 1906. 



PLEASANT BURGER. 



Burger, Elder Pieasant, of Moulton, 
Iowa, This faithful and useful servant 
of God was born in Estil County, Ken- 
tucky, April 27, 1848, and moved to 
Iowa in 1S59. He obtained a hope and 
joined the Missionary Baptists in 
1884 and lived with them five years, 
and then united with Fox River 
Church of Primitive Baptists, Davis 
County, Iowa. He was ordained June 




PLESANT BURGER 



the doctrine of grace. Data for a 
more extended sketch could not be 
obtained. 




JAMES BURK. 

Burk, Elder James, departed this 
this life June 2, 1895. He was born in 
Ohio, February 19, 1835, and moved 
with his parents to Lewis County, 
Mo., in the year 1855, and was mar- 
ried to Miss Rebecca Hall in 1857. 
He professed a hope in Christ in Ohio 
and joined the Methodist Church. He 
afterwards became dissatisfied and 



54 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



joined the Missionary Baptists in Mis- 
souri, but was still dissatisfied. He 
had never heard an Old Baptist 
preach and knew nothing about them 
as a people, and like a great many 
others thought their doctrine was dan- 
gerous. But he was so dissatisfied 
with the people with whom he was 
identified, he concluded that he would 
go and hear Elder Henry Louthan at 
a school house near by, and there for 
the first time heard a doctrine that 
harmonized with his experience, and 
met a people with whom he felt he 
could live. He afterward joined Lunies 
Creek Church in Shelby County, Mo., 
and lived a faithful and consistent 
member until death. He was ordained 
August, 1889, by Elders S. W. Sears 
and ■ — ■ — ■ Burke, and ever after- 
wards proved his devotion to the 
cause of God and truth. 



to those whom he believed to be God's 
chosen people. 



WM. C. BURKS. 

Burks, Elder Wm. C. was born 
March 7, 1818 and died December 3, 
1904. When he was about seven years 
old his father, James L. Burks moved 
to Talbot County, Ga., where Elder 
Burks grew to manhood, and was mar- 
ried to Miss Sarah Weathers, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Weathers. He united 
with the Primitive Baptist Church 
(Shiloh) in Tallapoosa County, Ala., 
and was baptized by Elder James Car- 
ter, and was soon chosen by the 
church and set apart by ordination as 
deacon, Elder Carter, J. J. Dickson, J. 
M. Pearson, and W. H. Mitchell offi- 
ciating as presbytery. From there he 
moved to Leak County, Miss., and uni- 
ted by letter with the church at "Pil- 
grims Rest," and the 27th of Novem- 
ber was ordained to exercise in all the 
functions of the gospel ministry, Eld- 
ers J. G. Crecelius and W. Crawford 
acting as presbytery. In November, 
1872, he settled in Comanche Ccunty. 
Texas, and by the aid of W. M. Don- 
ald constituted a church and called it 
Shiloh, and for some time afterwards 
was the only Primitive Baptist preach- 
er in the county. He said he always 
found it good to trust in the Lord and 
do that which the Saviour commanded 
as his duty; said it gave a peace of 
mind the world could neither give nor 
take away. For more than ten years 
of his life he was not able to walk 
without the aid of crutches, but would 
go to church and preach to his people 
up to within one year of his death. He 
loved the cause for which he was fight- 
ing and was ever an humble minister 



SAMUEL BRANCH BURNETT. 

Burnett, Elder Samuel Branch, of 
Georgia, was born in Dinwiddie Coun- 
ty, Va., 7th April, 1803. Moved to Geor- 
gia in early life and settled on a farm 
in Crawford County near Mt. Paran 
Church which church he joined Octo- 
ber, 1827. He served this chuich as 
clerk and deacon, and was ordained to 
the ministry November, 1838, by Eld- 
ers Jonathan Neal, Luke J. Nowell 
and Simon Parker. He was soon called 
to serve Bethel, Salem, Mt. Paran 
and Shiloh churches. He was with the 
churches in the Missionary struggle, 
and stood by the churches in the Ma- 
sonic struggle. He ever tried to de- 
fend the rights of the church, and 
the doctrine of Gcd our Saviour. He 
died February 5, 1887, and was one of 
the oldest citizens in Bibb County. 
His rectitude of life and firmness of 
character is well known by all who 
knew him. He was one of the oldest 
and ablest ministers of the gospel of 
Christ, having worn the gospel yoke 
fifty years defending the cause of his 
heaA r enly Master with a steadfast 
faithfulness until called to his re- 
ward. 




MILTON WESLEY BYRAM. 

Byram, Elder Milton Wesley, of 
Iowa, was born in Dard County, O., 
December 1, 1837, and when a child 
moved with his parents to near Union 
City, Ind., where he grew to manhood. 
At the age of twenty-one he was mar- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



55 



ried to Miss Mary McFarlan, who died 
-within about ten years afterward. 
About this time he moved to Iowa 
and was in 1874 married to Miss Ma- 
hala Oldham, who died the same year. 
Soon after this he was again married 
to Mrs. Mary I. Roberts. Early in life 
he was convicted of sin and after ma- 
turity united with the Baptists, was 
soon elected as clerk of his church, 
then ordained deacon and in 1894 was 
ordained to the full functions of the 
gospel ministry. He served several 
churches as pastor and was at the 
time of his death Moderator of Des 
Moines River Association, and during 
his ministry proved his love for the 
cause of truth in word and deed. 




JOSHUA CABBAGE. 

Cabbage, Elder Joshua, Gentryville, 
Ind., was born in Wlarwick County, 
Ind., October 13, 1840. In early life he 
was convicted of sin and given a hope 
in the Saviour and united with Little 
Zion Church of Old School or Piinii- 
tive Baptists. Soon he was ordained to 
the work of the ministry and has 
since been preaching wherever in the 
providence of God, his lot has been 
cast, though his services have been 
confined mostly within the bounds of 
the Little Zion Association, which as- 
sociation he has served both as clerk 
and moderator. Elder Cabbage, though 
nearly seventy years old, is active and 
zealous in the cause of truth and 
spends most of his time in traveling 
among and preaching for churches in 
Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Ten- 
nessee. 




M. M. CANNINE. 

Cannine, Elder M. M., of Crawfords- 
ville, Ind., was bom in Montgomery 
County, Ind., April 13, 1850. His 
grandparents on both sides, and his 
parents were Baptists. He cannot re- 
member the time when the conversa- 
tion of Christians was not pleasant to 
his ear. In his thirteenth year he be- 
came especially interested in the 
things of the Kingdom' of Jesus, was 
convicted of sin and in his sixteenth 
year of age was given a hope in the 
Saviour. The follow ing year — Febru- 
ary, 1SG7 — he united with the church, 
and soon commenced speaking in pub- 
lic, but there arising a division in the 
church of his membership over the 
"two-seed-doctrine" and its kindred 
subjects, some of these advocating 
these doctrines opposing his ordina- 
tion, he was not ordained until Octo- 
ber, 1901. Elder Cannine is considered 
sound in the doctrine and practice of 
the apostolic church. Recently he 
writes: "I joined the dear old church 
in '67 and soon commenced spea'Jng 
in public and have no reason to desert 
the flag of my Master, although fitian 
cial distress has tied my hands so 
that I feel I am doing nothing for the 
cause as I should." May God's dear 
people not muzle the ox that tredeth 
out the corn. 



HARON CANTRELL. 

Cantrell, Elder Haron. The Christ- 
ian life of this worthy minister was 
mostly spent in the Little Vine Asso- 
ciation of which he was often Moder- 
ator, though he sometimes visited 
other associations. He was truly a 



56 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



father in Israel, an earnest contender 
for truth and good order in the 
church, and when he fell asleep it 



could truly he said of him "a great 
man has fallen in Israel." 



H. C. CARD. 

Card, Elder H. C, This faithful min- 
ister lives in Montgomery, 111., and 
is serving Old Harmony the oldest 
church in the county, which was or 
ganized in 1820. He was born 1841, 
convicted of sin and made to love the 
church in 1863, but lay out of his duty 
until 1870 A\hen he united with the 
church. He was ordained to the full 
work of the ministry 1896, but a full 
sketch of his life and labors could 
not appear for want of data. 



CALVIN CARD. 

Card, Elder Calvin, born 1812, died 
1852, was the father of Elder H. C, 
and a faithful and uncompromising 
soldier of the Cross, and highly es- 
teemed as a minister of the gospel. 
He was faithful until the end and died 
in the full assurance of the gospel he 
had preached to others. 



R. W. CARLISLE. 

Carlisle, Elder R. W., was born 1805 
and died November 3, 1890, near Good- 
water, Coosa County, Ala., He united 
with the Baptist church in 1830, be- 
fore the division, and was soon there- 
after set apart as deacon, and subse- 
quently moved to Chambers County, 
Alabama, and thence to Tallapoosa, 
and was ordained to the ministry at 
Darien Church by Elders Moses Gunn 
and John M. Duke in 1845, and in 
1859 he moved to Coosa County, Ala., 
serving from three to five churches, 
till the infirmities of age forbid his 
continuance. For more than twenty 
years he was moderator of either the 
Wetumpka or Hillabee Associations. 
Elder Carlisle was regarded as a 
sound, consistent and able minister, 
and after faithfully serving in that ca- 
pacity for near fifty years, fell asleep 
in Jesus and entered his eternal home 
"that house not made with hands, 
eternal in the heavens." 




C. J. CARMICHAEL. 

Carmichael, Elder C. J., of Liberty, 
Ind. This aged, faithful and zealous 
minister of the New Testament was 
born in Monroe County, Ind., August 
12, 1833; raised up at hard physical 
labor and had but few opportunities 
to obtain an education; convicted of 
sin in his eleventh year and determin- 
ed that he would get religion which 
appeared so easy to do, but proved an 
impossible task. Years passed and 
still he would put off "getting relig- 
ion," until one day in 1855 while plow- 
ing he was, by God's spirit, made to 
see his broken promise and to fall 
upon his knees between the ploy-han- 
dles and cry for mercy, and for about 
two years he was a penitent, and like 
the poor publican could only cry. 
"Lord, be merciful to me a sinner." 
But God comforted him as He does 
all of his mourning children and gave 
him a hope in Jesus. He united with 
the church, was soon impressed to 
preach Jesus to others, but ran from 
duty,, denied that he was so impress- 
ed, was afflicted with loss of goods 
and burden of mind and made to 
pray: "Lord, not my will, but Thine 
be done." Soon he was ordained and 
his labors blessed of the Lord. 
Churches were constituted, an asso- 
ciation formed, the broken walls of 
Zion built up and Zion's children com- 
forted. His wife who united with the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



57 



church one month previous to him, 
has, during their long pilgrimage to- 
gether, proved a true helpmate — a 
companion indeed — a devoted mother 
in Israel, who labored hard to sup- 
port her children and contribute to 
the cause of truth so that they might 
not be a burden to the church. And 
she has been blessed to see her chil- 
dren believe and love the same doc- 
trine that has been so precious to her 
and her husband. Elder Carmichael 
has traveled in several states preach- 
ing the sweet gospel of grace and has 
been well received. He is humble, 
meek and kind-hearted; but also firm, 
unwavering and uncompromising with 
error. A lover of peace,, fellowship and 
good will among God's people he has 
labored to that end, but feels that the 
doctrine of God our Saviour and the 
practice of the Apostolic Church 
should not be sacrificed,, but God's 
erring children should be labored with 
in a gospel manner and restored 
whenever possible. 



THOMAS CARNES. 

Carries, Elder Thomas, of Villa Rica, 
Ga., is the beloved moderator of New 
Hope Primitive Baptist Association 
and the faithful pastor of New Hope 
and Hopewell churches of Douglass 
and Carroll Counties, Ga., and the 
editor regrets that sufficient informa- 
tion could not be obtained for an ex- 
tended sketch of his life and labors. 



THOMAS CARR. 

Carr, Elder Thomas, of North Caro- 
lina, was born in Virginia, May 17, 
1804. Joined the Methodist Church 
when young, became dissatisfied and 
joined the Primitive Baptists at Old 
Fox Creek Church, Grayson County, 
Va., November 3, 1837. Was licensed 
to preach August 3, 1838, and after- 
wards ordained to the full work of the 
ministry. He served Cross Roads, 
Rock Creek and Zion churches and 
adorned the profession he made. He 
was a faithful pastor, often rode 
through rain, hail and snow until his 
clothes were frozen on him. Notwith- 
standing he was a poor man, money 
could not hire him to preach, nor 
could money hire him to quit preach- 
ing, for the cause of Christ was so 
near and dear to him, that he counted 
all natural things but dross,, that he 
might obtain that inheritance that is 
incorruptible and undefiled and fadeth 
not away. He died June 21, 1876, in 
the full triumphs of faith. 



ALBERT CARTWRIGHT. 

Cartwright, Elder Albert. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was born in Hide 
County, N. C, in 1816, and died in 
1892. His parents were Quakers. In his 
thirty-third year he was made to feel 
alarmed about himself as a sinner 
while listening to Elder John Stadler 
preach; was brought under deep con- 
viction, received a good hope in Jesus, 
united with the church in 1851, and 
was baptized by Elder George Cara- 
wan. He was soon impressed with the 
word of the Lord, was liberated to ex- 
ercise his gift in 1853 and ordained in 
1865, and was soon called to serve 
the following churches: Mattomuskeet 
Lake, Beulah, and Bethlehem in Hyde 
and Tyrell Counties, N. C. Elder Cart- 
wright was kind and considerate but 
uncompromising when it came to 
principles. He was well beloved by 
his people and exerted a good influ- 
ence in his county. 



DAVID CARTER. 



Carter, Elder David, of Beaufort 
County, N. C, was born June 22, 1834, 
and died November 27, 1908. He united 
with the church at the Head of Pungo 
about 1860, was baptized by Elder 
Albin Swindell and truly adorned the 
profession he made by a well ordered 
Christian walk and conversation. He 
was ordained in 1876 and was, until 
the end of his earthly pilgrimage, a 
faithful minister; as a man he was 
strictly honest in dealing with his 
fellowman, was industrious, and well 
provided for his own house. 



B. F. CASEY. 



Casey, Elder B. F., of Texas. This 
able, worthy minister died a few years 
ago. The editor's efforts to secure 
data from which to write a suitable 
notice of his life and labors proved 
fruitless. He died at his post, in the 
churchhouse at one of his regular 
meeting at Wylie, Texas. 



W. J. CASEY. 



Casey, Elder W. J. was born August 
27, 1849 in Newton County, Ark., grew 
up as a moral boy, was deeply con- 
victed as a sinner in 1868, given a 
sweet view in Jesus as his Saviour 
and made to rejoice in his devotion, 
united with the church in 1884, or- 
dained to the full work of the gospel 
ministry 1885. Elder Casey is pastor of 
Little Hope Church, has traveled much 
among the churches and baptized sixty 
persons into the fellowship of the 
church. He is the beloved moderator 
of the Little Zion Association. 



58 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



JESSE E. CASEY. 



Casey, Elder Jesss E. (- 



-18G4), 



was an able minister of the Old 
School order and faithfully proclaimed 
Jesus as the way, the truth and tiie 
life for many years. He was in the 
constitution of Mt. Gilead Church in 
Arkansas in 1844, and was, for a num- 
ber of years, the moderator of the 
Buffalo Association. The editor re- 
grets that for lack of data a full 
sketch of his life could not be given. 



A. J. CASSELL. 

Cassell, Elder A. J. peacefully passed 
away at his home near Cassell, Va. 
on the 15th of October, 1901, and was 
buried at old Senter Church, Henry 
County, Va. He was eighty years old, 
and was a preacher more than fifty 
years. He served as moderator of the 
Smith River Association, and pastor 
of several churches acceptably for 
about half a century. He had but 
few equals in the ministry, and was 
held in high esteem by the Baptists. 
He was noted for his pulpit oratory and 
loved for his faithfulness. 




WALTER CASH. 

Cash, Elder Walter, of St. Joseph, 
Mo. The subject of this notice was 
born in Linn County, Mo., September 
2, 1856. His parents were Loyd and 
Mary J. Cash. When a boy his father 
moved to Linn County, Mo., in 1843, 
and after his return from the Mexi- 
can war, in which he was a soldier, 
settled in Linn County. He never be- 
came a member of the church, though 
a firm believer in the doctrine, and a 



warm supporter of the church, and for 
many years had the Christian fellow- 
ship of the members. Through Elder 
Cash's boyhood days he lived a moral 
life, having an ambition to be truly 
a good and useful man in the world 
When about sixteen years of age, he 
became greatly concerned about his. 
standing before God, was deeply con- 
victed of sin and after vainly trying 
to live a perfect life, was made to feel 
and see the corruption of his heart, to 
cry unto God for mercy and was given 
a sweet hope in Jesus. The church 
was viewed by him in a beautiful way. 
May, 1873, when the church met at 
the home of his grandfather, Elder 
Thomas T. Burk, a true, tried servant 
of the Lord, who kept the faith until 
his course was finished, and the oppor- 
tunity was announced by the pastor of 
the church, Elder Wilson Thompson, 
he went forward, was received and was 
baptized by Elder Thompson. He was 
married in 1875, to Miss Ellen P. Hard- 
in, who was a member of the M. E. 
Church but who, upon becoming ac- 
quainted with the doctrine of grace, 
asked for membership in the church. 
She had not the privilege of being 
baptized, however, as the Lord called 
her home February 2, 1876. His sec- 
ond wife was Miss Emma Bentley, to 
whom he was married March 4, 1877. 
She was also a member of the M. E. 
Church South, but in May 1880 became 
a member of West Union Church, and 
has uncomplainingly borne the burdens 
which fell upon her by her husband 
giving his labors to the churches. Elder 
Cash was licensed in January, 1877, 
and ordained May, 1880 to the full 
work of the ministry, and has been the 
faithful pastor of several churches. He 
is now pastor of West Union, Liberty 
and Little Flock, and is editor and 
proprietor of The Messenger of Peace. 
Elder Cash has labored for the up- 
building of the churches with tongue 
and pen by trying to establish them 
on Scriptural practice, and to this end 
he published a work entitled, "Practi- 
cal Suggestions for Primitive Baptists," 
the first edition of which was issued in 
1899. He also put out to accompany 
this work a "Deacon's Account Book," 
for the systematizing of the financial 
business of the churches, and a 
"Clerk's Record Book," so ruled as to 
give the history of each member in 
connection with the roll of members. 
He also published "The Primitive Bap- 
tist Hymnal," which contains words and 
music that is well received among the 
people. Elder Cash is one of our most 
able writers and speakers and is well 
received among the Baptists wherever 
known. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



59 




BRYANT CASH. 

Cash, Elder Bryant was born May 5, 
1867, in Chariton County, Mo. His 
father was James Cash, son of Abram 
Cash, who -was a son of Elder Warren 
Cash, of Hardin County Ky. He was 
married to Miss Dora P. Brooks, March 
10, 1889. United with Sardis church, 
of Primitive Baptists in Chariton 
County, Mo., and was baptized by Elder 
Walter Cash, on the second Sunday in 
November, 1890. In October, 1897, he 
moved with bis family to the Cherokee 
Nation, Indian Territory, now the state 
of Oklahoma, and has lived there since. 
He heard of Prairie Valley Primitive 
Baptists Church about forty miles from 
his home and united with this church 
in March, 1901, by relation as the 
church where he had his membership 
had gone down, and soon commenced 
talking in public, was licensed by the 
church in 1903, and ordained December 
1907, by a presbytery composed of the 
following named brethren: Elders J. 
M. Biddy, J. J. Christian, F. M. Wisdom, 
O. E. Odell and Deacon G. A. Carpenter. 
His labors in the churches has been 
confined to the bounds of Elk River 
Association in Southern Kansas and 
Oklahoma; and Center Creek Associa- 
tion in Southwestern Missouri. Elder 
Cash writes me in which he says: "I 
realize my inability to discharge the 
very important obligation that is laid 
upon me as a minister. I desire so 
much that God will bless our beloved 
Zion, and that his children may walk 
worthy of their calling, which is an 
holy calling to a life of soberness, 
holiness and virtue." 



JAMES CASTLEBERRY. 

Castleberry, Elder James, died at his 
residence near Water Valley Yalla- 
busha County, Miss.. July 19, 1885, of 
paralysis. Brother Castleberry was 
born and raised in Alabama, where he 
obtained a hope in Christ and united 
with the Primitive Baptists. Soon after 
he became deeply impressed to preach, 
he decided to go where (as he ex- 
pressed it) there were but few Bap- 
tists and a new country, and he would 
be relieved of such impressions; ac- 
cordingly he emigrated to Mississippi, 
in about 1855, where he found Baptists 
of his kind, and became so restless and 
distressed that he began to preach, 
and was soon ordained and traveled ( 
and preached among the churches, 
much to their comfort and edification. 
He was the Moderator of the Hopewell 
Association for several years, was 
dearly beloved by all the brethren who 
knew him; and especially the Bap- 
tists of the Hopewell Association. He 
was able in the defense of the truth; 
humble, devoted and faithful, in all 
his relations of life, deep in the doc- 
trine of the gospel, lucid in all his il- 
lustrations, and one of the best disci- 
plinarians. He was truly an exemplary 
man in all his daily life, so that he had 
the confidence of all who knew him, 
having a good report of them that are 
without. 




SAMUEL CATE. 

Cate, Elder Samuel, was born in Jef- 
ferson County, Tenn., July 5, 1830, and 



60 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



united with Moravia Church, near Mo- 
ravia, Iowa February 10, 1866, where 
he was ordained May 7, 1887. Elder 
Cate was of a meek and quiet disposi- 
tion and much loved among his breth- 
ren, and it is regretted that a full 
sketch of his life could not be given, 
but other information could not be ob- 
tained. He died November 24, 1894. 



B. E. CAUDILL. 

Caudill, Elder B. E., of Kentucky, 
though of limited education, was a man 
of power and influence. He was born 
in Kentucky in 1830, united with the 
church in 1850, ordained in 1854, and 
lived among the churches of his native 
state until about 1865 when he moved 
to Allegheny County, N. C, and united 
with Elk Creek Church by letter. He 
began preaching within the bounds of 
the Mountain District Association and 
after many years of untiring zeal and 
fruitful preaching in this and sister 
associations, where he baptized hun- 
dreds, he returned to his native state 
and died in the triumphs of faith, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1889. He was an eminent 
servant of God. 



BENJAMIN CAVE. 

Cave, Elder Benjamin. This pioneer 
preacher of Ohio was born in Culpepper 
County, Va., June 15, 1760. His father 
was an Englishman and emigrated to 
America about 1730, and was a member 
of the House of Burgess in 1756. The 
subject of this sketch was a gallant and 
faithful soldier in the Revolutionary 
war and in his old age drew a pension 
from the government in recognition of 
his faithfulness. After the war he 
moved to Kentucky and later to Fairfax 
County, Ohio, united with the Baptists, 
soon ordained a minister and organized 
the Laurel Baptist Church in 1803, was 
first pastor of Licking Church in 1807, 
and served other churches in Ohio in 
the early years of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. He died in Ross County Ohio, at 
a ripe old age and in the full triumph 
of a living faith. 



JAMES CAVENAUGH. 

Cavenaugh, Elder James, was born 
January 1, 1816, and died March 10, 
1899. in Duplin County, N. C. His 
membership was at Muddy Creek 
Church. He was for many' years a 



faithful preacher. His life was spot- 
less, his spirit gentle and lovely, sim- 
ple and child-like. He had no fellow- 
ship for wrong doing, but was a lover 
of good men, a lover of the Lord Jesus 
and his doctrine. He was a man that 
if you knew him you would have no 
fear about his doing wrong. You 
would not expect anything of him but 
to do right, and you would not be disap- 
pointed. He never sowed discord 
among the brethren. He willingly 
labored as long as he was able to serve 
churches, going far and near, using his 
gift to glorify the Lord and benefit his 
brethren. 



- " ' '- " '■■■ 




S. F. CAYCE. 

Cayce, Elder, S. F. (1850-1905) of 
Martin, Tenn. This eminent minister 
was born in Kentucky, joined the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church 1866, ordained, 
1878, traveled a great deal, engaged in 
many debates and died at his post in 
his fifty-fifth year of age, while attend- 
ing the Collins River Association, near 
McMinnville, Tenn. while preaching on 
the subject of the resurrection., he was 
stricken and died abouc 5 p. m., the 
same day. Before leaving home he 
seemed to have a premonition of death. 
He asked his son Claud, if he would 
take up his work where he would soon 
leave off and conduct it as he had 
done. Elder Cayce was truly a noble and 
useful man. He' was the founder of 
the Primitive Baptist, and with tongue 
and pen was an able defender of the 
truth. Though an earnest defender of 
the faith once delivered unto the 
saints yet he was meek, humble, gentle, 
tender and loving. His moral char- 
acter was spotless, his conversation 
chaste and his manners refined. There 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



61 



were many especial acts of the citi- 
zens of Martin, Tenn., his native town, 
which show more strongly than any- 
thing else could have shown the es- 
teem, love and worth in which he was 
held. Every business house in town 
closed its doors; and the other denomi- 
nations had their bells tolled. Also the 
bells of both colleges, the Methodist 
and Missionary Baptist, were tolled, 
and on the doors of the Methodist 
church mourning was placed both 
Monday and Tuesday, and on Tues- 
day their appointment for preaching 
was called in, their protracted meeting 
having begun on Monday night. These 
acts of friendship by so many differ- 
ent denominations and business men, 
were a great comfort to the bereaved 
and broken-hearted family. Remarks 
eulogistic of the character and stand- 
ing of Elder Cayce were made by Eld- 
ers E. B. Simmons, J. Harvey Daily 
M. A. Hackworth, J. V. Kirkland, G. T. 
Mayo, all of the Primitive Baptist 
Church; Revs. J. R. Bell, E. H. Stewart 
and A. E. Scott of the Methodist 
Church, and Rev. W. H. Whitson of 
the Missionary Baptist Church; Dr. 
James Balaam Stephens, Hon. J. O. 
Vincent, and Miss Mayme Miller, a 
very dear friend of the family, who 
touched on the character and worth 
of the deceased in a most beautiful 
and feeling way. 




C. H. CAYCE. 

Cayce, Elder C. H., was born June 1, 
1871 in Moscow, Ky. On September 
23, 1891 he was married to Miss Lula 
Jenkins, at her home near Martin, 
Tenn., where he now lives. He joined 
the Primitive Baptist Church at Green- 



field, Tenn., in August 1S89, and was 
baptized by his father, Elder S. F. 
Cayce in September, 1889. He made 
his first public effort in 1890, liberated 
to exercise his gift the same year, and 
ordained to the full work of the minis- 
try in December, 1896. He has served 
the following churches as pastor, Buf- 
falo, Martin (his home church), Har- 
mony, Blooming Grove, Union and 
Shiloh. He has preached in every 
county in West Tennessee except Ben- 
ton and Lake, in 'a majority of the coun- 
ties of Middle Tennesee, traveled ex- 
tensively in Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana.. 
Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, 
Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ala- 
bama, Georgia, and Florida. Some 
years traveling as much as 10,000 miles. 
He has had ten debates with Camp- 
bellites two with Missionary Baptists 
and one with the Mormons, and has 
baptized between 200 and 300 people. 
He began working in his father's print- 
ing office September 1, 1886, and has 
held every position up to editor. He 
began editing the Primitive Baptist in 
1905, on the death of his father and 
has been successful with this paper, 
the list increasing since then from 6,500 
to 10,000 yearly subscribers. 



STEPHEN CHANDLER. 

Chandler, Elder Stephen, born Sep- 
tember 15, 1808, and died 1850. He uni- 
ted with the church in 1S2S, and began 
preaching the same year. He faithful- 
ly served four churches most of his 
ministerial life. Among those he was 
pastor of were Flat River, Ebenezer, 
Stone's Creek and Wheelers in Pear- 
son County, N. C. He also lived for a 
few years in Edgecombe County. When 
not serving his churches he taught 
school and labored on his farm, and 
was noted for his industry. He was a 
gifted preacher. 



W. A. CHASTAIN. 

Chastain, Elder W. A., of Springfield, 
111., was born near Campbellsburg, 
Ind., August 12, 1877. From his ear- 
liest recollection he had a desire to be 
classed as a good boy. In his four- 
teenth year he was convicted of sin, 
made to see that all self-righteousness 
and moral goodness was but as filthy 
rags in God's sight when depended up- 
on for justification and though young 
in years he was stripped of all self- 
dependence and given a hope in Jesus. 
About two years later, July 1893, he 
lunited with Old Union Church in 



62 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Washington County, Ind., the church 
of his father, and was baptized by Eld- 
er W. E. Radcliff. His mother was 
baptized the same day and he has 
since baptized his sister into the fel- 
lowship of this dear old church. Soon 
after joining he became deeply con- 
cerned about his duty as a witness for 
Jesus, was encouraged by his pastor, 




W A. CHASTAIN 

Elder Radcliff, and began preaching 
in 1896, and was, in January, 1899, 
ordained to the ministerial work. Elder 
Chastain has traveled and preached 
in many of the states and has been 
favorably received. In 1890 he re- 
vised and compiled the manuscripts of 
Elder Benjamin Lampton. This book 
is of unusual interest to all lovers of 
Bible truth. 





F. A. CHICK. 

Chick, Elder F. A., of Hopewell, N. J., 
was born in the township of Embden, 



Somerset County, Maine, August 10, 
1845. His father was Abraham Chick, 
and his mother was Betsey Quint, a 
sister of Elder William Quint, who was 
pastor of the church at North Berwick, 
Maine, for more than forty years and 
whose sister, Mary, was the wife of 
the late Elder William J. Purington. 
The subject of this memoir spent the 
early years of his life in Somerset 
County, Maine. Prom boyhood he was 
fond of reading and study and then 
formed habits, which have followed 
him all his life since. His parents were 
anxious that he should acquire a good 
education and did all that they could 
to advance this object. In all the com- 
munity in which they lived, none com- 
manded more respect and love. They 
were humble, honest, industrious, and 
God fearing people. From early child- 
hood, Elder Chick was often oppressed 
with the knov ledge of his own sinful- 
ness before God, and from the time of 
about eight or nine years of age, until 
the age of sixteen, there was but little 
time in which he was not anxious about 
the future of his soul. Although na- 
turally of a happy and cheerful dispo- 
sition when in company, he spent many 
days and nights mourning and longing 
for rest in the Lord. The Bible was his 
frequet companion, and religious books 
were much read by him. Like all who 
have been called by grace he found ho 
peace or rest in his own promises or 
obedience, and at last, came to the 
place where all hope failed, and he Was 
in despair. It was then, after some 
months of deep anxiety, unrelieved by 
one ray of light, when just past his 
sixteenth birthday, that it pleased Al- 
mighty God to appear for his relief and 
to reveal Jesus unto him as the one 
perfect and spotless Saviour and His 
redemption as a finished redemption. 
The revelation of the t uth was clear, 
although his rejoicing was not so great, 
as has been the case with some. But 
the faith begotten in his heart at that 
time, has abided with him. One year 
from this time, for the first time in his 
life, it was his privilege to hear from 
the lips of Elder William Quint, the 
first gospel sermon that had ever fallen 
upon his ears from the text, "Except a 
man be born again, he cannot see the 
kingdom of heaven." One year later, 
at North Berwick Maine, he was bap- 
tized in the fellowship of the church 
by Elder Quint. In February, 1866, he 
spoke in the way of preaching for the 
first time from the words found in 
Luke, Chapter 12, verse 32, at a school- 
house in North Berwick, Maine. Since 
that time he has been constantly en- 
gaged in the ministry of the word and 
was in September, 1868. ordained to 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



63 



the full work of the gospel ministry by 
Elders Philander Hartwell, W, J., Pur- 
ington, William Quint, Hiram Camp- 
hell, John A. Badger and J. N. Badger. 
Immediately after his ordination he 
was called to the care of the Ebenezer 
Church in Baltimore City, and the 
Black Rock and Patapsco Chu ches in 
Baltimore County, Md. These churches 
he served for twenty-eight years. By 
far the larger portion of this time he 
served the Shiloh Church in Washing- 
ton City D. C, as a supply. In 1896, 
the church at Hopewell, N. J., after the 
death of their former pastor, Elde:' 
Wm. J. Purington, called Elder Chick 
to become their pastor. After some de- 
liberation he accepted the call and 
since June of that year has served 
that church, together with the second 
Hopewell church a few miles away. 
November 28, 1894, Elder Chick be- 
came one of the editors of the "Signs 
of the Times," published at Middle- 
town, N. Y„ the oldest among all the 
papers published in support of the 
Old School Baptist cause in this coun- 
try. The preaching of the gospel has 
been the one great desire and aim of 
his life for more than forty years, and 
it can be well said of him that he is an 
able defender of the doctrines of our 
Lord Jesus, a forciful speaker, fluent 
writer and a lovely, useful man. 




JOHN M. CHRISTIAN. 

Christian, Elder, John M., of Pierce, 
Ala., was born September 5, 1841, grew 
up an Arminian, and went so far try- 
ing to establish his own righteousness 
that he thought it a sin to even drink 
coffee. Yet the first serious impression 
he had on religion was while in the 



army, was convicted of sin while in 
prison and after much sorrow of mind 
was sweetly relieved and made to love 
Jesus as his Saviour. On his return 
home he united with the Missionary 
Baptist church, lived with them about 
fourteen years and labored in their 
Sunday schools and societies. He be- 
came convinced of the errors he was 
teaching, left them and united with the 
Primitive Baptists, was liberated to 
exercise his gift and soon ordained to 
the full work of the ministry. The Lord 
has blessed his labors in the service of 
his home church. Though he has been 
greatly afflicted he remains faithful in 
his love for the church. 




ISAIAH CLABAUGH. 

Clabaugh, Elder Isaiah, was born in 
Hancock County, Ohio, November 18, 
1841 and died September 29, 1905, pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ and united with 
the Friendship Church of Primitive 
Baptists in Knox County, 111., in the 
year 1860. Was impressed to speak in 
public of the mercies of God to poor 
sinners and was on May 10, 1873 (be- 
ing then a member of the Blue River 
Church of Page County, Neb.), ordain- 
ed to the full work of the ministry. 
After which he moved to the state of 
Missouri and settled within the bounds 
of Rock Creek Church, of which he 
was a member and faithful pastor for 
about 29 years. He was great'y beloved 
by his brethren, was a noble pastor, 
ever watchful of the interests of the 



64 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



church, a great pacifier in time of 
trouble. In a word he was a man of 
peace, ever gentle, kind, forbearing 
and forgiving, yet firm and faithful. In 
and out of the pulpit he was meek and 
humble, had no desire fo ' preferment 
above his brother ministers and was 
free from a hateful spirit of jealousy. 
In his ministry he knew nothing but 
the mercy of God in the salvation of 
sinners. He was a deep thinker, an 
able, lovely writer and at the lime 
of his death was on the editorial staff 
of the Banner of Peace. 




JOSEPH CLAPP. 

Clapp, Elder Joseph, of Appleton. 
Mo. Failing to secure data from which 
to prepare a sketch of Elder Clapp, the 
following notice from Elder Cash's 
book is herewith given. "Elder G'.app 
was born in Clark County, 111., Septem- 
ber 13, 1843, and united with Provi- 
dence Church in March, 1866. He was 
ordained October 18, 1890, and is at 
present, 1896, the pastor of one 
church." 



HENRY CLARK. 

Clark, Elder Henry, (1791-1841), was 
born on the western frontier of Penn- 
sylvania, and was indebted to the exer- 
tions of his poor but pious mother, 
for a common education. He was bap- 
tized in Philadelphia in 1807, and 
called to preach the gospel for the 
Shamokin Church, when about the age 



of twenty-one years. He was afterwards 
pastor, for some years, of the Little 
Muncy Church; and subsequently of 
the Loyalsock Church. In 1821, Elders 
Smiley, Woolverton and Clark organ- 
ized the Northumberland Particular 
Baptist Association. Elder Clark was 
a zealous predestinarian. He preached 
a finished, unconditional salvation, 
maintaining to the last an unyielding 
opposition to the new plans of making 
proselytes by means of money and mis- 
sions. 




JOHN CLARK. 

Clark, Elder John, of Va. The sub- 
ject of this memoir was born in 
Orange County, Va., on Clark's Moun- 
tain, July 4, 1804, where he spent many 
of his younger days. Being blessed 
with a good constitution, a strong mind 
and great energy, he began early the 
battle of life forming habits of in- 
dustry which never forsook him. He 
learned the business of millwright and 
bridge-building, in which he became 
a proficient. He erected tne first bridge 
across the Rappahannock river at 
Fredericksburg, and many other crea- 
tions of his genius stand today to testi- 
fy of his skill. Some years after build- 
ing the bridge referred to, he was ap- 
plied to to repair it, in the prosecution 
of which he was thrown from the top 
some twenty or thirty feet below upon 
a pile of stone, from which he was tak- 
en more dead than alive, but was pre- 
served by Providence for future use- 
fulness. The Lo"d Jesus having need 
of him in another direction, called him 
by his grace to a knowledge of heaven- 
ly things. Being impressed that it was 
his duty to make a public profession of 
His Name, he offered himself to the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



65 



church and was baptized by Elder Dan- 
iel Davis in 1829. He was ordained in 
1831 by Elders R. B. Semple, L. W. Bat- 
tle and A. H. Bennett and commenced 
the work of the ministry with only 
advantages of a common school educa- 
tion, but being possessed of a fine mind 
a retentive memory and a zeal which is 
of God, became a good scholar, not only 
mastering to a great extent his mother 
tongue, but pressed his researches far 
into the Latin, Greek and Hebrew lan- 
guages, acquiring a large amount of 
useful information, and aided by the 
Holy Spirit, was enabled to stand up 
amid opposing elements and show his 
opinion, which always elicited respect 
from the wise and good. Upon the 
threshold of his Christian life he es- 
poused the doctrine of salvation by 
grace to the exclusion of all others. 
He raised the standard with Jesus and 
Him crucified inscribed upon all its 
ample folds. By it he stood with his 
heart and finger ever raised to this 
motto, which embodied all that he de- 
desired to preach. His labors in his 
Masters' vineyard were, perhaps, more 
abundant than any minister's in his 
native state. Besides the ordinary 
routine of duties when at home, he sup- 
plied monthly, five churches, besides 
several other preaching places, and 
attending many funerals and mar- 
riages. Obeying many calls to go 
to the 'regions beyond' he took long 
preaching tours to many of the states 
of the union, considering himself the 
servant of all. He commenced the pub- 
lication of Zion's Advocate in 1853 and 
was editor over twenty-eight years, 
and has left behind him a vast amount 
of solid information. He was the edi- 
tor and compiler of the Ebenezer Hymn 
Book, which was first published in 
1856. Before his death he had the 
fifth edition out. He was truly an able 
minister of the New Testament and 
, was looked upon by some as the lead- 
J ing minister of the Old School Bap- 
tist in Virginia. All these things, too 
heavy sometimes for weaker minds, 
never for a moment made him anything 
else than what he really was — a meek, 
humble and sympathizing spirit. As 
pastor he presided over his flock with 
dignity and affection. Their cares and 
comforts were his. The feeble as well 
as the strong found in him a friend and 
father. He gave evidence that he was 
set for the defense of the gospel and 
faithfully did he guard the treasure 
until he was called upon by his Lord 
to lay down his armor. A short time 
before his death he gave many direc- 
tions about his earthly affairs, spoke 
many comforting words to those 
around , and when near the end, in 



communion with his God, he was heard 
to say, "My Father, my Saviour, my 
precious Redeemer," many, many 
times repeating Scripture and hymns 
and in constant prayer. When asked 
what he needed, said: "Rest, rest." 
Soon his Father gave it. A stupor 
came upon him, from which he could 
not be aroused, and h e died in the full 
triumph of faith, November 9, 1882. 



S 




WILDE C. CLEVELAND. 

Cleveland, Elder Wilde C, was born 
on April 9, 1836, in Crawford County, 
Ga., near Mt. Carmel Primitive Bap- 
tich Church, where he joined by exper- 
ience and was baptised into the fellow- 
ship of the same by his father, Elder 
Cromwell W. Cleveland, in I860. And 
there, also, he was ordained a minister 
of the gospel in 1873, by Elders Samuel 
Bentley, John Dickey, Alfred King, and 
D. W. Simmons. He then served that 
church and three others near around 
as pastor for thirty odd years, or until 
his last illness prevented. As pastor, 
he was punctual and unselfish untiring 
and faithful, rain or shine, if physically 
able, he not only attended his regular 
meetings, but also visited the sick and 
afflicted, and ministered to those in 
prison. Thus an example to his flocks 
in practical godliness, he provoked 
them to love and to good works. They 
supplied him with all necessary carnal 
things, which in turn doubtless made 
his labors for them a pleasing free-will 
offering. But his greater ability was 
displayed in defense of our doctrine, to 
which he brought all the powers and re- 
sources of his mighty mind. His natur- 
al powers of eloquence and oratory 
made his sermons not only attractive 
and interesting to those who differed 
from him in doctrine, but also con- 



66 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



vincing, inspiring and upbuilding to the 
believer by their sublime logical deduc- 
tions from scriptural truths. His grand 
yet nice distinction between law and 
gospel — works and grace — were simply 
wonderful, and especially was he gifted 
in making those nice discriminations 
on points dividing us from others, not 
only in doctrine, but also in missionary 
operations, not only clear but 
without offense. He endeavored to 
give no offense to the church nor the 
world, so that he might gain the more. 
If a man differed from him religiously 
he remembered he differed from that 
man religiously, making them equal 
and he was ready to take what he gave. 
So that while he would strike home 
with all the might and boldness of his 
strong convictions of truth as he be- 
lieved it, he never hurt one personally, 
for he fought principles and not per- 
sons. And all denominations respected 
him, as knowing him to be sincere and 
without guile. Another admirable and 
lovable trait in all his character, was 
that so soon as he was convinced of er- 
ror in belief or words spoken unadvis- 
edly, or to the hurt of another, he not 
only turned from it at once, but also 
confessed it openly, and none were too 
low for him to stoop to them in confes- 
sion and asking pardon — if need be. 
Thus he manifested the touching gen- 
tleness of a guileless heart — the sweet 
simplicity of a child. After he attained 
to manhood and graduated at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, he studied law and 
practiced it four years, and also served 
as captain of a company and colonel of 
a regiment. But when ordained to the 
ministry he gave up all else to fulfill 
this high calling — "the highest and 
most honorab?e calling and position in 
the world," he called it; and to which 
he bent all his energies, making it 
secondary to nothing, so long as he 
lived. Surely he deserved the plaudit 
"Well done, good and faithful servant!" 
He died at his home at Culloden, Ga., 
October 31, 1905. 



JOHN CLINE. 



Cline, Elder John, of Des Moines, 
Iowa, was born April 8, 1830. His father 
was a Virginian and served under 
Washington in the war for in- 
dependence, his mother, Elizabeth 
McClaskey, was a native of Kentucky, 
daughter of Col. Joseph McClaskey, 
who was under General Jackson at 
New Orleans. At the age of ten years 
he was taken by his parents to hear a 
Baptist preacher, was deeply impress- 
ed, and made to feel if he could tell 



the sweet story of Jesus like this old 
preacher he would give all the world. 
For the next ten years of his life he 
served Moses — laboring to keep the 
law perfectly, and when about twenty- 
one, he united with the Cumberland 
Presbyterians and felt he was all right 
with God, was a leader at the prayer 
meetings and hating all who did not 
run with him, especially the Old School 
Baptist. Like Saul he was willing to 
persecute them even to his utmost 
ability and verily thought he was doing 
God's service, and like Saul was also 
wonderfully convicted and truly con- 
verted, and made to preach the very 
doctrine he tried to destroy. After 
many months of deep conviction he 
was given a sweet hope in Jesus, united 
with the Point Creek Church and was 
in a few years ordained to the full 
work of the ministry. Elder Cline is 
now (1908) seventy-eight years old and 
writes me"My eyes are not dim nor 
my mental abilities abated. I desire 
to press on preaching Jesus — Nothing 
but Jesus." He has for eighteen years 
lived in the city of Des Moines, where 
he is surrounded by the stylish and 
fashionable religion of the world, but 
none of these things move him, nor 
cause him to swerve from his Shep- 
herd, and the foot-steps of the flock. 




JACOB CLOUD. 

Cloud, Elder Jacob, of Nevada, Mo., 
is a useful and much beloved minister. 
Though he has for more than thirty 
years traveled much among Baptists 
and faithfully served the cause of truth 
he modestly says of himself: "I was 
born in the state of Tennessee, July 16, 
18S3. I came to Missouri in 1852, and 
a year later it was my happy lot to re- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



67 



ceive a precious hope in the crucified 
Redeemer, after a long and deep con- 
trition of heart on account of my sins. 
Jesus, who often spoke of coming into 
our hearts, appeared in my room, 
bringing love and peace, and making 
me feel free from sin and guilt, for a 
few days thereafter. I was baptized by 
Elder Wl H. Mahurin, of Arkansas, on 
New Year's day, 1854, and was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry in 
1877. Farming was my occupation till 
1880. Since then I have traveled in ten 
of our states and Indian Territory in 
defense of the doctrine and order of 
Christ's church, and my preaching has 
been received by Bible Baptists, and a 
few times (comparatively) I have had 
ease of mind and the dear Master's ap- 
proval. Of late years I have been 
much afflicted and frail, proving that 
the outward man must perish as the 
years go by, but the inward man is 
most graciously and surprisingly sus- 
tained by the invisible power of Him 
who created him in the image of the 
Divine." 

J. T. COATS. 

Coats, Elder J. T., of Coats, N. C. 
This humble, faithful and unassuming 
minister, is and has been for years, 
Moderator 1 of the Little River Primitive 
Baptist Association. He has for many 
years been an able minister of the 
New Testament and is now the beloved 
pastor of Fellowship, New Hope and 
Mt. Zion churches. 




COCKRAM. 



Cockram, Elder J. D., of Woolwine, 
Va., is a native of Floyd County and has 
for thirteen years been preaching a 



finished and complete salvation in 
Jesus for all the elect. He was early 
in life made to feel the exceeding sin- 
fulness of sin and given a desire to op- 
pose it in self and in others, and daily 
prayed that God might deliver him 
from gloomy despair and use him for 
some good in the world. At or about 
the age of twelve years he was given a 
rest in Jesus and ceased from his own 
labors for justification, and about this 
time was deeply impressed to publish 
Jesus to others. The burden of his 
prayer was "Lord, if I must be a teach- 
er in Israel give me wisdom; O above 
everything give me wisdom." And 
there was an assurance within as of a 
voice saying, "Multiplying I will multi- 
ply thee, and blessing I will bless thee." 
Elder Cockram is a gifted preacher 
and an able writer. He is editor of 
Spiritual Law Counsel a monthly per- 
iodical published at Bona, Virginia, 
and has also written and published a 
very interesting book entitled, "The 
Celestial and Terrestrial or Spiritual 
Law in the Natural Kingdom." 



ACHILLES COFFEY. 

Coffey, Elder Achilles, of Kentucky, 
was born in Wayne County, Ky., July 
30, 1806. In 1813 the time of the Brit- 
ish war, his parents moved to the terri- 
tory of Indiana, Jefferson County, and 
settled four miles from the fort. Here 
they suffered many privations, and for 
many years they moved from place 
to place, sometimes seeking more suit- 
ble locality, some time fleeing from the 
red men. During all this time they 
were almost entirely destitute of any 
means of education. And yet strange 
as it may seem, Elder Coffey, who was 
raised among the savages and wild 
beasts, procured sufficient education 
and knowledge to write a history of the 
Baptists, which is known as "Coffey's 
History," and is of recognized worth. 
He made a profession of religion early 
in youth and attached himself to the 
Baptist Church before the division with 
the New School or Missionary Bap- 
tist. Believing the Bible, and the Bible 
alone, to be the only rule of faith and 
practice and being utterly opposed to 
the inventions of men in the affairs of 
religion, he stood firm on the principles 
upon which the church was founded. 
By his unswerving fidelity to the 
Apostles' doctrine, he rendered much 
service to the cause of truth. There 
was no man that stood higher among 
the Baptists of Southern Illinois than 
did Elder Coffey; and not only among 
them, but was a man of good report 



68 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



with them that are without. After a 
long and useful life he fell asleep 
March 10, 1883. 




THOMAS COLE. 

Cole, Elder Thomas, of Amanda, O., 

was born February 15, 1828, and grew 
up in sin and in love with it but while 
running after the riches of the world 
and feasting on their future posses- 
sions, he was, one day in 1855, while 
alone at work in the field, convicted of 
sin and the vanities of the world. His 
conviction was deep, his condemnation 
clear and for about two years he labor- 
ed under the curse and was made to 
feel that all good works of men were 
as filthy rags in God's sight in the mat- 
ter of justification before Him. But 
Jesus was revealed to him; he united 
with the Old School Baptist Church in 
1858 and in 1876 was ordained to gos- 
pel ministry. He is now in his eighty- 
first year, and though feeble in body is 
strong in faith and desires to finish 
his course with joy. 



H. V. COLE. 

Cole, Elder H. V., of Simpsons, Va., 
was born June 7, 1853 ; reared by Chris- 
tian parents and taught morality, truth- 
fulness and honesy and though he often 
had serious thoughts of hell and 
heaven, life and death he felt he was 
not so bad — not in much danger — in 
fact felt his case much better than 
some who were members of the church, 
but God convicted him of his natural, 
Pharisaical religion, showed him the de- 
ceitfulness and wicked state of the nat- 
ural heart; weaned him from self and 



self-righteousness and gave him a 
sweet hope in Jesus. He, with his 
wife, Tempy (Lawrence) Cole, to whom 
he was married in 1877, and who had 
for some time had a hope, united with 
Laurel Creek Church, October, 1894, 
and was baptized by Elder Amos Dick- 
erson. About one year later he began 




H. V. COLE 

to speak of Jesus publicly and was soon 
after ordained, and now has the care 
of Laurel Creek, Pine Creek, Salem 
and Valley View Churches the last two 
in connection with other brethren. Eld- 
er Cole desires to preach Jesus as the 
only Saviour of sinners and to abide 
in the doctrine and practice of the 
Apostles. 




J. R. COLLIER. 

Collier, Elder J. R., of Wealthy, 
Texas, was born in Monroe County, 
Miss., January 3, 1850, was baptized 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



69 



into the fellowship of the Primitive 
Baptist Church by Elder J. T. Blanch- 
ard, at Revelee Church, Logan Coun- 
ty, Ark., 1882, and was ordained to 
the work of the ministry in Nacog- 
doches County, Texas in 1890. Since 
his ordination Elder Collier has had 
the care of from two to four churches, 
is a loyal, faithful servant, and is 
satisfied with the doctrine of God our 
Saviour and the practice of His apos- 
tles. 




A. J. COLEMAN 



Coleman, Elder A. J., of Alabama, 
was born in Abbeville District, S. C, 
January 10, 1814, and died in Pickens 
County, Ala., September 19, 1899. In 
early life he moved to Georgia, where 
he and his faithful companion, Mary 
(Smith) Coleman, to whom he was 
married in 1835, united with the Prim- 
itive Baptists. Soon he moved to West 
Alabama, was ordained to the minister- 
ial work early in life and for about 
fifty-five years was a faithful and per- 
haps, 'the leading minister, among 
Primitive Baptists in West Alabama. 
A man of strong nature, of deep, ear- 
nest and sincere convictions, gentle as 
a child and bold as a lion, ready-witted 
and humorous, as a young preacher he 
was the idol of his brethren and friends 
and the wonder of the multitude. He 
was well informed in the scriptures 
and wonderfully gifted of God in inter- 
preting and expounding them to the 
glory of God and the edification of all 
lovers of truth. He informed himself 
in the past history of the church, 
and had a mind well stored with 
general information, and his in- 
terest in acquiring useful infor- 
mation was in sharp contrast with 
some in our day who speak disparag- 
ingly of such things. He was well-to- 



do in ante-bellum days, and always 
took a lively interest in the welfare of 
his country and was a staunch Demo- 
crat, and, by solicitation, represented 
his county fourteen years in the legis- 
lature of Alabama, and his senatorial 
district one session, and some have 
said that he was the best stump speak- 
er they ever heard. He was what men 
called a brilliant man and in the prime 
of his noble manhood, and the most 
active part of his ministry people of all 
creeds and no creeds are said to have 
nocked in vast crowds to hear him. It 
is said that his presentation of the 
truth as it is in Jesus was wonderful 
and his arraignment of error and of 
Babylon was fearful to their devotees. 
Some would get mad and affirm that 
they would never hear him again; 
nevertheless they would continue to go 
and hear him. Satisfied with the sim- 
plicity which is in Christ Jesus, he op- 
posed all human merit as a means of 
eternal salvation, and all innovation 
upon the practice of the primitive or 
apostolic church, and all the secret so- 
cieties of men as a means of moral im- 
provement. He was a little below the 
medium in height and weight; posses- 
sed a black, penetrating eye and a per- 
sonal magnetism which seemed to just 
naturally and irristibly draw men to 
him, and to know him was to love 
him. Humorous, witty, good-natured, 
and at times awfully solemn, he would 
at one time have you convulsed with 
laughter, and at another time he would 
have you in tears. His humorous and 
funny tendency was doubtless a weak- 
ness, and a fault which he often con- 
fessed and mourned over, but it did 
seem to be as excusable in him as any 
one. Many a poor soul that was nearly 
dead with the "blues," as some call 
them, or the hysterics has been made 
to forget them on the approach of this 
great and good man, for he seemed to 
carry with him a spirit of encourage- 
ment and good cheer. He seemed ever 
ready, and had a word for everybody 
and every occasion. Generous almost 
to a fault, he was ready to divide the 
last morsel with the poor and afflicted, 
of whatever creed or color. Having a 
good nerve, he seemed almost a strang- 
er to natural fear. His ministerial lab- 
ors were confined in the main to the 
bounds of the Buttahachie and Pil- 
grim's Rest Associations and to those 
in immediate correspondence with 
them. Outside of these bounds he 
traveled but little. The counties of 
Fayette, Lamar, Tuscaloosa, Pickens, 
and Greene form the region in which 
he labored mostly, and it is quite likely 
that that region will never know an- 
other A. J. Coleman. He was an able 



70 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



write:' and contributed to the Signs of 
the Times occasionally and the Prim- 
itive Baptist, published at Raleigh, N. 
C. After the death of Elder Burwell 
Temple, about 1870, he was for a 
number of years editor of the Primitive 

Baptist. 

I. F. COLEMAN. 

Coleman, Elder I. F., of Riffe, 
Wash., was ordained to the work of 
the ministry August 20, 1904, by Eld- 
ers R. B. Langford, I. N. Newkirk, W. 
H. Gilmore and F. L. Riffe. He is 
serving churches in Washington, 
though a fuller sketch of his life and 
labors could not be obtained. 



JOHN S. COLLINS. 

Collins, Elder John S., died at his 
home in Arlington, Tarrant County, 
Texas, January 9, 1895. He professed 
a hope in Christ in 1857, and joined 
the Missionary Baptist church. He 
taught one session of school, and then 
entered the Confederate army in 1861. 
He was taken prisoner twice, and con- 
fined in Rockland prison, and when 
discharged at the close of the war had 
been there nineteen months. He 
preached his first sermon on January 
1, 1867, being then with the Mission- 
aries, and remained with them until 
1868. He then joined the Primitive 
Baptists at Sardis, Jackson County, 
Ala., and was ordained to the full 
work of the ministry on October 20, 
1873, by a presbytery composed of 
Elders Peter 'Maples, Simeon Hanck, 
Andrew J. Worm and John Butler. He 
moved to Texas in 1879, and settled in 
Anderson County, and taught school 
and preached. He has treveled and 
preached through Texas, and most of 
the Southern and some of the North- 
ern states. He was apt to teach, an 
able defender of gospel truth, and 
shunned not to warn the church when 
he found the enemy approaching. He 
was Moderator of the Trinity River 
Association several years, and was 
clerk at the time of his death. 



C. H. COLLINS. 

Collins, Elder C. H. (1836-1903), of 
North Carolina, was one that can truth- 
fully have applied to him the words, 
"He fought a good fight and kept the 
faith." He united with Cross Roads 
Church in his twentieth year, was li- 
censed to preach in 1870, ordained 1872, 
and began to serve churches soon after- 
ward, which he attended diligently, 
ever striving to show his faith by his 
works. He was, in 1900, elected Mod- 
erator of the Mountain District Asso- 



ciation, which position he held until 
his death. In preaching, his theme 
was salvation by grace, and a walk in 
life that would adorn such a glorious 

doctrine. 

JOSEPH COLLINS. 

Collins, Elder Joseph, was the son of 
Joseph and Frances Collins. He was 
born on the 15th day of September. 
1835, entered the Civil war at an early 
age and proved a faithful soldier, and 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church at 
Castalia, Nash County, N. O, on the 
6th of June, 1874, and remained a faith- 
ful member up to his death. He was 
baptized by Elder A. J. Moore on the 
7th of June, 1874. The church soon 
saw his gift and called for his ordina- 
tion to the work of the ministry, which 
was done on the first Sunday in May, 
1SS9 by Elders Greenwood and B. Will- 
iams. Elder Collins was a good and 
kind husband, father and neighbor. Al- 
though a man of rural habits, unedu- 
cated, yet he was a forcible and soul 
stirring preacher. He preached regu- 
larly at the church at Castalia, being 
pastor of same as long as he lived and 
also at times at other churches, and 
died in the full triumph of faith, Jan- 
uary 8, 1901. 




Z. J. COMPTON. 



Compton, Elder Z. J., (M. D.), son of 

Howard and Elizabeth Compton, was 
born near the foot of the B'ue Ridge 
mountains in Rappahannock County, 
Va., January 19, 1801. Notwithstanding 
his lack of opportunity for education 
by reason of distance from school and 
necessity of working on the farm from 
early youth until twenty-one years of 
age, he spent every moment he could 
spare studying, and at his maturity 
was well qualified to engage in teach- 
ing school, which he did until he was 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



71 



ready for the practice of medicine and 
the work of the ministry. His entire 
time as a student at school was about 
fourteen months, and I dare say that 
what he accomplished in that short 
time at school as a student and whilst 
teaching would put to shame 
many of our present day college grad- 
uates. He was modest and unostenta- 
tious but thoroughly posted in what he 
taught and practiced. He was a man 
of a sweet disposition, beloved by all 
who knew him, and if he had an enemy 
at all, he was one who could not bear 
sound doctrine. The doctrine of the 
Old Order of Baptists he delighted in 
and proclaimed it from the pulpit from 
early youth until near the age of eighty- 
six. He was not eloquent as a preacher, 
but a well informed one and spoke with 
great ease and was truly one that 
needed not to be ashamed. He admin- 
istered to the people both as a physi- 
cian and minister whether they paid 
him or not, and very little money was 
given him for his long, faithful service 
in the ministry but he never wavered 
or faultered in duty, because others 
were neglectful of their duty for it was 
not for money that he preached, but 
purely the cause of Christ. At the age 
of twenty-six years, Dr. Compton mar- 
ried E'iza McKay, daughter of Jere 
miah McKay, of Page County, Va. From 
this union fifteen children were born. 
His wife died some ten years prior to 
his death, and he lived to be in his 
eighty-sixth year, and died at Benton- 
ville, Warren County, Va., at the home 
of his son, Dr. J. B. Compton. He 
fought a good fight and finished his 
course with joy. 



GABRIEL CONKLIN. 

Conklin, Elder Gabriel, of New Jer- 
sey, fell asleep in Jesus, April 28, 
1868, in the seventieth year of his 
age. He was born in Orange County, 
N. Y. At an early period of life his 
mind was drawn from the vanities of 
earth, and firmly fixed on heavenly 
things. He was baptized in the fellow- 
ship of the New Vernon Church, Oc- 
tober 17, 1824, by Elder Thomas B. 
Montange, and in June of the follow- 
ing year was chosen deacon. July 31, 
1830, he was licensed to preach, and 
in 1831 was ordained to the work of 
the gospel ministry. In March, 1832, 
he accepted a call to serve the Brook- 
field Church, where he continued to 
labor until he removed to the King- 
wood Church in New Jersey, where he 
labored faithfully and successfully 
for many years, until he was called to 
lay his armor by. The peculiar and 
prominent traits of his character were 



such as develop the fruits of the 
Spirit: love, peace, gentleness, good- 
ness, faith, meekness, temperance and 
brotherly kindness. In his ministry, 
and more especially in the later years 
of his labors, he was truly a "Boan- 
erges," or son of thunder, in defense 
of truth and exposition of error; and 



jfm^s 




GABRIEL CONKLIN 

in all his course he was emphatically 
a son of consolation to all the tried 
and afflicted children of God. He was 
a lover of peace and union among the 
saints, and all who have known him 
have awarded him the character of 
peace-maker, in 1832, when a conven- 
tion of Primitive and Apostolic Bap- 
tists was held with the Black Rock 
Church, in Baltimore County, Md., and 
at which time and place a solemn pro- 
test was published against all the new 
religious innovations which were then 
pouring into the church like a flood, 
when a firm stand was taken to resist 
and withdraw fellowship from all who 
walked disorderly, Elder Conklin par- 
ticipated, and with Beebe, Barton and 
many others stood firm in the cause 
of truth. He was a most beautiful 
singer, and greatly enjoyed the simple 
song service in the worship of God. 



WM. CONRAD. 



Conrad, Elder Wm. This able and 
zealous servant of God was born m 
Harrison County, Ky., December 6, 
1797, united with Dry Ridge Baptist 
Church September 20, 1820, and was 
baptized by Elder jared Riley. He was 
some years afterward ordained to the 
ministerial work, and for about half 
a century, was a faithful laborer in 
the Master's vineyard.. Elder Conrad 
wrote a history of his life and travels, 
together with a concise history of 
the following Old School Baptist 



72 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Churches: Williarnstown and Fork- 
lick, Grant County, Raysfork, Scott 
County; and Twin Creek, Harrison 
County, Kentucky. This book contains 
422 pages and was published in 1876. 
In it is related many interesting inci- 
dents of this eminent minister's 
labors and the reader, for a full his- 
tory of him, is referred to its pages. 
He died about twenty years ago full 
of years and rich in faith and trust- 
ing in the grace of God that he had 
so ably preached to others. 




JOHN A. CONLEE. 

Conlee, Elder John A., of Waverly, 
111., was born in Sangamon County, 111., 
February 22, 1855, and united with 
Head of Apple Creek Church, in Mor- 
gan County, 111., January 14, 1879. He 
was ordained in December, 1893 and 
now has the care of three churches, to 
whom he gives an earnest service. This 
brief sketch appears in Elder Cash's 
book. The editor regrets data for a 
full sketch could not be secured. 



DANIELT. CONNER. 

Conner, Elder Daniel T., was born 
December 9, 1S43, and died January 23, 
1895. He united with Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Jack's Creek, Patrick 
County, Va., July I860, and was bap- 
tized by Elder Daniel Conner, was 
licensed bv the church to preach in 
June, 1883, and in April, 1S84. was 
ordained by a presbytery of Elders G. 
L. Tuggie and Amos Dickinson. He was 
the South and was with Washington 
in doctrine, and could truly say with 



Paul, by the grace of God I am what 
I am. His humility and exemplary 
walk told all who knew him that he was 
a subject of grace. For several of the 
last months that he labored in his 
Masters' vineyard he preached with 
increased warmth and zeal and seemed 
to be much favored with a sweet fore- 
taste of that heavenly world which 
he is now realizing. 



JAMES CONNERS. 

Conners, Elder James. This faithful 
minister was born in Culpepper Coun- 
ty, Va., November, 1745, and died at 
his home near Battle Run Church, 
June, 1832, the year of the division 
between the Old and the New School 
Baptists. He was a self-made man, an 
eminent preacher, a strong defender 
of religious liberty and fought in the 
Revolution under General Green in 
the South and was with Washington 
at the surrender at Yorktown. After 
the war, he was, for many years, pas- 
tor of Thorntons Gap and Battle Run 
churches. Elder Conne s opposed 
the modern missionary schemes 
that were being pressed upon the 
churches in his latter days and was 
one whose influence assisted in pre- 
venting the Shjloh Association from 
adopting the Arminian theory and 
method of Missions. He was a man of 
great mental power and firmly estab- 
lished in the doctrine of Christ and 
the apostles of salvation by grace. 



W. J. COOPER. 

Cooper, Elder W. J., of Rome, Ga., 
is pastor of Antioch, Pleasant Hill and 
Midway Churches of the Enharlee 
Primitive Baptist Associations. He is 
also the beloved Moderator of this 
Association, and his labors are highly 
esteemed among the churches. 



JOHN A CORDER. 

Corder, Elder John A. was a very 
gifted minister of the Old School order. 
Was ordained at Big Red Stone Prim- 
itive Baptist Church by Elders James 
Janway, Ruben I. Skinner and Martin 
Robinson, December 3 1855. The late 
Elder T. N. Alderlon wrote the follow- 
ing relative to Elder Corder: "My 
acquaintance with Brother Corder 
commenced about thirteen years ago. 
I was then in my tender youth, also in 
grace. Since that time I have been 
much in his company, and have re- 
ceived more instruction and informa- 
tion from him than from any other one 
man, and had formed an attachment 
for him, the full strength of which I 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



73 



did not find out till he was gone. His 
mortal remains were followed by his 
friends to the Little Capon Church. It 
is easier to imagine than describe the 
feelings of the people when, at his 
usual hour for preaching, his inanimate 
body was carried into the house. But 
the tongue of the orator was silent; 




JOHN A. CORDER 

the warrior had laid down his arms; 
the watchman had been called down 
from his watch-tower; he had come this 
time to stay till the trumpet of God 
shall call for his sleeping dust." The 
editor is unable to obtain a more 
complete account of this useful and 
well beloved servant of Jesus 




JAS. S. CORBITT. 



Corbitt, Elder Jas. S., of Greenville, 
N. C., fifth child and third son of a 
family of fifteen children born unto 
Jas. M. and Anise (Brinkley) Corbitt, 
dates his natural birth October 27, 
1858. At the age of twelve he was 



seriously impressed with the subject 
of his soul's salvation and was given 
a remarkable dream that caused him 
much concern, and which he after- 
wards realized, at least, to some ex- 
tent, the fulfillment of which was in- 
structive to him in the way of salva- 
tion. He was given other vi- 
sions and dreams, and other ev- 
idences of his interest in the salva- 
tion of Jesus and of his duty to the 
church, and having obtained a good 
hope through grace he united with the 
Primitive Baptists in 1880 and was in 
1886 ordained to the gospel work by 
Elders Wm. A. Ross and "Wim. Jones. 
Elder Corbitt has served Blount's 
Creek, Cross Roads and Tyson's 
churches and has traveled and preach- 
ed among other churches in eastern 
North Carolina. 




PETER CORN. 

Corn, Eider Peter, Moderator of the 
Pigg River Association and greatly 
beloved by the household of faith who 
know him, was born February 26, 1834, 
in Patrick County, Va., reared by 
parents of moderate circumstances, 
labored hard when a youth and re- 
ceived but a common school education. 
In a sketch of his life published in 1907, 
he says of himself: "I feel to say the 
Lord "has blessed my efforts to live an 
honest and upright life, though I have 
been in great straits and did not see 
how I could get out. I feel to say the 
Lord always opened up a way, I today, 
though not rich, have a sufficiency of 
this world's goods to keep me com- 
fortable, and if I ever wronged a man 
out of a cent or failed to pay every 
cent that I owed to any man and he will 
make me sensible of the fact I will pay 
him fourfold. I have tried to live a 
moral and sober life, have used some 



74 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



spirits during life. I have never been 
intoxicated nor have I ever gone to 
a bar-room and bought a drink of in- 
toxicating spirits, never have been 
warranted or sued on any of my con- 
tracts with my fellow man." He united 
with the church March, 1860, and was 
baptized by Elder Joshua Adams, and 
in a few years was ordained to the full 
work of the ministry. Elder Corn has 
ever been faithful to the cause of 
truth, serving churches constantly and 
walking worthy of his high calling. 
Though in his seventy-fifth year at this 
writing (1908) he is still active and full 
of zeal, contending earnestly for the 
faith once delivered unto the saints. 

BLOUNT B. COOPER. 

Cooper, Elder Blount B., was born 
in Martin County, N. C. but the date 
of his birth is not known to the 
writer. He was a useful and gifted 
minister and after a long and faithful 
service in his Master's cause, he on 
the 25th of January, 1854, breathed 
his last, surrounded by his affection- 
ate family and friends. A friend writes 
of him as follows: "His death has 
caused a vacuum which can be filled 
only by him who first gave him to 
the church. It may in truth be said of 
brother Cooper that he mourned with 
them that mourn and rejoiced with 
those who were enabled to rejoice in 
the Lord as their Redeemer. Wise in 
counsel, courteous in his deportment, 
inflexible in the truths of the gospel, 
with a fruitful mind and loving heart 
he was a father in Israel and great 
advocate of the truth as it is in 

Jesus." 

JACOB CORRELL. 

Cornell, Elder Jacob (1817-1883), was 
born in the county of Montgomery, 
Va. Professed a hope in Christ about 
the year of 1842, and joined the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church, October, 1846, at 
White Oak Grove. He was soon li- 
censed and in 1S50 was ordained to the 
work of the ministry. He was noted 
for his faithfulness in every respect 
and as a scriptorian his equals were 
seldom found, his gift seemed mostly 
to be setting forth the connections of 
the Old and New Testament and at 
what time prophesies were fulfilled. 



some time before he died, his mind was 
very much composed, often speaking 
of his departure and his hope which 
was anchored alone on Jesus. He often 
spoke of the goodness of God, and said 
the Lord had been abundantly good to 
him and sustained him to a good old 
age, brought him through many trials 



JOSEPH CORRELL. 

Correll, Elder Joseph, who served 
churches in Pennsylvania and West 
Virginia, died October 4, 1888. A full 
sketch of his life cannot be obtained 
by the editor. The following notice of 
his death was written by a friend: "For 




JOSEPH CORRELL 

and conflicts by the way, for which 
he desired to be thankful, and resigned 
to the will of the God who doeth all 
things well.' 'His funeral was at- 
tended by a very large concourse of 
people which came to pay the last 
tribute of respect to a Father in Israel. 
Elder Correll will be missed very much 
at home and abroad, as his acquaint- 
ance was great; but we hope our loss 
is his gain." 




Cory, Elder W. N., of Frankfort, O., 
was born near Frankfort, June 10, 1844, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



75 



raised a farmer's boy with opportun- 
ities for a good common school educa- 
tion and afterwards taught in the 
schools and also attended the Lebanon 
National Normal University. While at 
Lebanon, he united with the West 
Lebanon Primitive Baptist Church, 
May 8, 1868. He dated his first serious 
concern on religious things when a boy 
of eleven years, and obtained a pre- 
cious hope after many years of wilder- 
ness travel. He was baptized by Elder 
Samuel Williams and in June, 1886 was 
granted liberty by the church to exer- 
cise his gift. On October, 30, 1886, he 
was set apart to the gospel ministry 
by the church — Elder J. C. Reed deliv- 
ering the ordination prayer and Elder 
Daniel Hess the charge — Since that 
time he has been preaching among the 
Baptists wherever a door has been 
opened and has baptized many precious 
souls during his ministry. He lives on 
a farm. His wife is a true helpmate and 
they have raised seven children to 
man and womanhood. Elder Cory 
writes: "I can say that I have received 
much kindly consideration from my 
brethren, whom I esteem as the excell- 
ence of the earth." 




B. F. COULTER (M. D.) 

Coulter, Elder B. F. (M. D.), of 
Philadelphia, Pa., Dr. Coulter who is 
a successful physician as well as an 
able and zealous minister, was born 
September 3, 1846; graduated in med- 
icine March, 1880; convicted of sin, 
given a hope in the Saviour and 
in September, 1883, united with 
Welsh Tract Old School Baptist 
Church in New Castle County, Del- 
aware—the oldest Old School church 



year 1887. Dr. Coulter moved his mem- 
bership to Salem Church, Philadelphia, 
Pa., and was in the year 1905, ordained 
to the full functions of the gospel min- 
istry. The following year he was called 
to the care of this church which holds 
regular meetings every Sunday morn- 
ing. Elder Coulter is an able defender 
of the doctrine of God our Saviour, a 
fluent writer and greatly loved by his 
people. 



ELIJAH S. COUNTS. 

Counts, Elder Elijah S. The subject 
of this notice, was born at Cleveland, 
Russell County, Va., February 10, 
1828. He professed a hope in Jesus 
and joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Reed's Valley, Russell 
County, Va., and was baptized bj 
Elder J. W. Smith in 1874. He remain- 
ed a faithful member of this church 
till he moved his membership to Sul- 
phur Spring Church, in Dickenscn 
County, Va., of which church he re- 
mained a member until his death. He 
was licensed to preach June 1, 1876, 
and ordained by Elders T. Grimsley, 
S. William and M. T. Lipps, in 1880. 
A firmer man never lived. Whatevei 
he believed to be truth, he maintained 
unwaveringly to the last. His object 
was not to please men, but please 
Him who had called him to be a sol- 
dier. He was faithful. He stood firm 
on the old platform contending with 
all his ability for the doctrine and or- 
der of the Primitive Baptists, and 
strenuously opposing the introduction 
of new things among the Baptists. 
Brother Counts traveled many miles, 
through wet and dry, heat and cold, 
preaching the glad tidings of great 
joy, and in his latter days was un- 
doubtedly possessed with brighter 
views and revelation. He was enter- 
taining and instructive in his conver- 
sation. He seemed to be greatly im- 
pressed in teaching the practical duties 
of the church and the discriminating 
laws of Zion, and in unfolding the 
glorious mysteries of the oracles ol 
God's word to the edification of the 
saints and the feeding of both the 
sheep and the lambs. The doctrine 
that he preached was not his, but His 
who sent him. He sought not to please 
men, thereby proving to be a servant 
of God ever standing firm upon the 
walls of Zion preaching salvation by 
grace through Christ and that grace 
given in Christ before the world be- 
gan. 



76 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 




JESSE COX. 

Cox, Elder Jesse, of Tennessee. This 
eminent minister was born July 19, 
1793, and died August 23, 1879. He was 
an able writer and was the author of a 
deep, spiritual work on prophecy and 
was an active, zea'ous preacher of the 
Old School Baptists for more than fifty 
years. The editor regrets a more 
complete sketch does not appear, but 
lack of reliable data prevents it. 




W. S. CRAIG. 

Craig, Elder W. S., of Cozad, Neb., 
a very lovely and useful minister 
modestly writes of himself as follows: 
"I was bom May 1, 1867, in Coles 



County, Ills., united with the Primitive 
Baptists September 8, 1889, being bap- 
tized by Elder F. M. Reeds. I was mar- 
ried to Miss Arminta L. Reeds, August 
26, 1891, and moved to Dawson County, 
Neb., in March, 1896. We soon found a 
small band of orderly Baptists and cast 
in our lot with them. Some time after 
this I was much troubled in mind about 
trying to preach. This I much dreaded, 
for I keenly felt my unworthiness and 
unfitness for such a high calling. But 
the more I tried to banish such feelings 
from my mind the stronger they grew, 
until I seemed unfit for business. Hard 
work would not drown these feel- 
ing and my mind seemed continu- 
ally meditating on some portion 
of Scripture. I was very reluc- 
tant to try to talk publicly though 
strongly urged to do so. But I 
found that after trying to talk, 
sometimes a peace of mind was given, 
and at other times a feeling of disgust 
with myself over such miserable fail- 
ures. Finally the church called for my 
ordination, though I told them that I 
thought such a step too hasty and that 
they should wait until I had given more 
proof of my gift. Being overruled in 
this matter I submitted, feeling afraid 
to absolutely refuse. So on October 5, 
1901, I was ordained at Loup River 
Church, in Custer County, Neb., by 
Elders Isaiah Waggoner, James H. 
Ring and M. G. Mitchell. This was a 
sad day indeed for me, and I remember 
of twice telling the presbytery that if 
they had the least doubt of my call, I 
did not want them to lay hands on 
me. I have always doubted my call, 
since my first impressions to preach. 
I indeed find the ministry a burden and 
feel that I wouldly gladly lay it down, 
if I could do so with peace of mind. 
But in my weakness I try to proclaim 
the glorious gospel of God's grace and 
the wonders of his redeeming love, 
trusting in him for ability to do so to 
his name's praise and the comfort and 
edification of his people." 



C. T. CRANK. 

Crank, Elder C. T., of North Carolina. 
In early life he was a captain of mer- 
chant ships on the Atlantic and was 
noted for his honesty in all the duties 
of life. He was born in Currituck 
County, N. C, August 7, 1821, united 
with the church, October. 1852, and 
ever lived a faithful member. He was 
appointed deacon in June, 1860, and 
fulfilled the office in faithfulness, and 
was, in 1867, given a liberty to exercise 
his gift. He was ordained in 1872 and 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



77 



boldly contended for the faith of the 
Lord Jesus Christ until he fell asleep 
in death, September 20, 1880. Elder 
Crank was greatly beloved by all who 
knew him for his honest deportment, 
was a good neighbor and failed not to 
attend to the poor and afflicted and it 




C. T. CRANK 

can be well said of him he has fought a 
good fight, finished his course, kept the 
faith and henceforth there is laid up 
for him a crown of righteousness which 
the righteous judge shall give all who 
loves his appearing. 



JAS. M. CREWS. 

Crews, Elder Jas. M., of Kerners- 
ville, N. C, was born in Forsyth 
County, N. C, September 15, 1877; 
married December 30, 1897, to Miss 
Lou V. Mathews; obtained a hope in 
Christ in 1892; joined the church at 
Pine Ridge in 1900, and was baptized 
by Elder J. W. Flinchum. He was 
licensed November, 1903, and ordain- 
ed to the full work of the gospel min- 
istry August, 1904, by Elders A. M. 
Denny and J. J. Joyce, and was soon 
called to the care of churches which 
he faithfully serves. 



C. L. CROUSE. 

Crouse, Elder C. L., of Hamburg, 
Iowa, was born in Allegheny County, 
N. C, April 25, 1871; received a hope 
in the Saviour in his nineteenth year 
of age, united with the Antioch 
Church, January, 1891, and was bap- 
tized by Elder J. M. Wyatt. For about 



one year he had sweet communion 
with the people of God and feasted, 
on fat things from the Master's table, 
but then it was that impressions to 
speak of Jesus with such feelings of 
unworthiness possessing his mind that 
he determined to move whero there 
were no Baptists. So in 1892 he turn- 
ed his back on the people he so dearly 
loved and for about four years roved 
over the western states, and like the 
dove from the Ark found no resting 




C. L. CROUSE 

place until he settled near Liberty 
Church, Fremont County, Iowa, which 
he joined by letter June, 1898. Seven 
years later — '1905 — he was licensed to 
preach, and in April, 1908, was ordain- 
ed by Elders W, J. Pollard, J. H. Ring 
and E. M. Kenney. Elder Crouse is. 
zealous in the cause of truth and sat- 
isfied with the Apostles' doctrine and 
practice, desiring to add nothing to 
or take from the perfect standard and 
thorough furnisher of all good works. 



JOHN CROY. 

Croy, Elder John, was born in Bel- 
mont County, O., September 11, 182S; 
moved with his parents to Morgan 
County, O., in 1830; received a hope 
of eternal life in Christ Jesus in 18G6, 
and, with his wife, united with Mt. 
Olive Primitive Baptist Church, Mor- 
gan County, O., in 1SG8; was baptized 
by Elder Lewis Kagy, and ordained 
to full work of the gospel ministry in 
1871. After serving different churches 
in different counties in Ohio until 
1886, he then moved to Fountain 
Head, Summer County, Tenn., where 
he and wife united with East Station 



78 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Camp Church and remained a faithful 
member until his death, which occur- 
red near Portland, January 24, 1895. 
He first joined the Methodist denom- 
ination, but their preaching and prac- 
tice were so contrary to his experi- 
ence and understanding of the Scrip- 
tures that he soon went to his true 
home — the Primitive Baptists. He 
was a faithful witness for Jesus and 
died preaching the gospel he so much 
loved. 




F. J. CRUMBY. 

Crumby, Elder F. J., of Montague 
Valley, Tenn., was born May 29, 1847, 
in Carter County, Tenn., professed a 
hope in Christ the year 1869, and in 
the same year joined the Missionary 
Baptists, being wrongly informed by 
one of their ministers who told him 
that their church was the Apostolic 
Church, but by reading his Bible he 
found it was not the church that Christ 
set up, that they preached salvation by 
works and the Bible taught salvation 
by grace. There was no Primitive 
Baptist churches near him at that time, 
but soon after some Primitive Baptist 
ministers went from Virginia and or- 
ganized a church on Stony Creek. This 
church he joined May, 1886, at a meet- 
ing held by Elders M. T. Lips and C. C. 
Whitehead. He was ordained Deacon 
in March, 1887. For many years he had 
been impressed with the duty of 
preaching. The church saw his gift and 
liberated him to preach in the bounds 
of the Washington Association, and he 
was ordained July, 1908, by Elders H. 
B. Miller and F. M. Salyer, Elder Crum- 
by is pastor of Blue Spring Church 
where he holds his membership. He 



wants no new thing in the service of 
God but desires to walk in the old path 
marked out by Christ and His apostles. 



KINCHON CRUMPLER. 

Crumpler, Elder Kinchon, of North 
Carolina. The subject of this sketch, 
was born in 1807. About the year 1837 
he united with the Methodist denomi- 
nation. While there the Lord arrested 
him by His spirit, opened his under- 
standing, showing him the wretched 
condition he was in by nature, and 
the need of a perfect righteousness to 
prepare him to stand in peace before 
God. When he found peace in Jesus 
he soon became dissatisfied with the 
Methodists; and sought the compan- 
ionship of Primitive Baptists about 
the year 1848. In a short while there- 
after he was liberated and soon after 
was ordained to the full ministry of 
the word. He became pastor of the 
church at "Upper Black Creek, in Wil- 
son County, N'. C, near his residence, 
and remained pastor here while he 
lived. He was a gifted preacher in doc- 
trine and experience, and enjoyed the 
full fiellowship and confidence of his 
brethren while he lived. Though fee- 
ble for years he was faithful in at- 
tending preaching. He fought a good 
fight and finished his course in peace. 



I. K. CRUMPTON. 

Crumpton, Elder I. K., of Alabama, 
— This faithful man fell asleep June 
25, 1893. The church at Mt. Olive, 
Shelby County, Ala., which he was 
serving at the time of his death, 
spread upon its records the following 
note of respect to his memory: "Where 
in it has pleased our Heavenly Father 
to take from our midst our beloved 
pastor, we in deep sorrow, give 
God the honor for the gift which in 
him was proven by his teachings, 
walk and worthy examples, which 
were the highest characteristics of 
God's love, and one of God's true and 
purest gifts that can be bestowed 
upon poor, frail man. In his meek, 
humble and energetic defense of the 
doctrine and word of God, and plan 
of salvation for poor, mortal man, he 
was ever untiring and unflinching to 
the last, and we, as a church, 
give this as our token of love for our 
departed pastor. Though his voice is 
forever hushed, and his presence for- 
ever sealed from our view, yet his 
teachings and admonitions liveth as 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



an example of character for a servant 
of the most high God. Although his 
warfare is over, his race run, and the 
work given him finished, yet may we 
be able to say, the Lord giveth and 
the Lord taketh away, blessed be the 
name of the Lord." 



S. S. CRUMPTON. 

Crumpton, Elder S. S., of Columbiana, 
Ala., is a brother of the late Elder I. 
K. Crumpton and has the care of 
churches among the people with whom 
he was born and raised. He was born 
in Shelby County Ala., November 19, 
1865. In his thirteenth year he re- 
ceived a bodily injury from an over- 
strain or lift from which he 
has never recovered. When about 
eighteen he was convicted for 
sin and made to feel that "if 
his soul were sent to hell, God's 
righteous law approved it well." But 
while thus burdened, hoping against 
hope and praying for God's mercy, 
God spoke peace to his burdened soul 
in a manner unexpected and surprising 
to him, and like Jacob of old, he could 
say, "the Lord was here and I knew it 
not." For more than a year he delayed 
uniting with the church, but finally 
went before Old Ebenezer, was re- 
ceived and baptized by his brother, 
Elder I. K. Crumpton. The year fol- 
lowing he was licensed and seven 
months later was ordained, and amid 
all the trials, hardships and discour- 
agements incident to a minister's life, 
to which is added his afflicted bodily 
condition, he has for the past twenty 
years proven true and faithful in the 
cause of Jesus. 



J. Z. CUMMINGS. 

Cummings, Elder J. Z., was born 
in Chambers County, Ala., March 31, 
1873. In youth he was taught that the 
Primitive Baptists were a dangerous 
people and he would not go to their 
services. He united with the Metho- 
odists while young and lived with 
them several years. Never having felt 
the gentle touch of God's finger of 
love, he was like the greater portion 
of the religious world, rowdy, wicked, 
and profane. He soon became dis- 
gusted with himself, feeling that he 
was only playing the hypocrite in m'o- 
Uessing religion, and for several years 
would not attend any church. Finally 
God's Spirit convicted him of sin, left 
him in great darkness for a season 



and then gave him a sweet hope in 
Jesus. He united with Harmony 
Church, Richland County, Ga., August 
1901, liberated in January, 1905, and 
ordained by Elders R. H. Jennings, 
W. T. Everette and H. H. Phillips 
May, 1905. Elder Cummings has con- 
tinually served churches since his or- 
dination and has been blessed in the 
work, having many seals to his min- 
istry. He writes me as follows: : "I am 
the least in my Father's house. Have 
had many seasons of rejoicing. Have 
traveled a good many miles, and met 
many of the dear saints. At present 
(1907) I am in the Chatawhatchee 
(Ala.) Association. My home church 
is Mt. Zion. I desire to finish my 
course with joy and die in the full 
triumphs of a living faith. I want no 
"new things" in God's house, feeling 
that Apostolic practices are good 
enough for me.' 



W. R. CUMMINGS. 

Cummings, Elder W. R. (M. D.), of 
Ste'la, Patrick County, Va., was born 
and raised in Monroe County, W. Va. 
He was given a good hope through 
Christ, when young, and soon after 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church of 
Christ at the Indian Creek Church of 
Indian Creek Association, by experi- 
ence, and was baptized by Elder Hub- 
bard, Moderator of that Association. 
Sometime after his baptism, Brother 
Cummins began to exercise a public 
preaching gift; and the church of 
which he was a member, seeing the 
manifestation of a preaching gift in 
him, set him apart for ordination, and 
ordained him to the full functions of 
the gospel ministry. He was about 
seventy years of age when he died, 
CI907) and had been preaching about 
forty years. He began the study and 
practice of medicine at an early age, 
and was not only eminent as a 
gospel minister of Christ, but was 
also, a good physician, and not only 
esteemed by his brethren and friends 
as an able minister, but also as a 
successul physician. Brother Cum- 
mings was possessed with all the 
graces that it takes to constitute a 
Christian gentleman; and was pleasant 
and entertaining in conversation, 
amiable and inviting in disposition, lov- 
ing and gentle in manners, having an 
humble, meek and quiet spirit, which is 
of great worth and more to be desired 
than rubies. He was chaste in conver- 
sation, honest, truthful virtuous in his 
everyday life, and commanding in ap- 
pearance. He was a loving husband, a 



80 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



good father, a good neighbor, a good 
citizen, a good physician, a good 
church member, and an able preacher; 
in fact a model Christian man, beloved 
by Primitive Baptists; beloved by the 
people, both white and colored. And he 
loved the Primitive Baptists most dear- 
ly, regarding them as truly the true 
church. He loved them because they 
loved the doctrine of grace and the 
ordinances of God's house (church). 
He regarded his many friend and the 
people generally with a great deal of 
respect; and, in preaching, his great 
desire was to feed the spiritual hungry 
and to comfort the poor mourner in 
Zion; and, in the practice of medicine, 
to heal the sick, and cure the wounded 
and the lame. Yea, verily, he went 
night and day, through cold, wet and 
heat, everywhere, wherever his lot was 
cast, or was called to go, doing good, 
seeking to elevate poor suffering hu- 



manity. Truly many noble traits of 
character were manifested in him. 



H. M. CURRY. 

Curry, Elder H. M., of Lebanon, O. 
The name of this gifted minister and 
able writer is familiar to many of our 
people and the editor regrets that his 
efforts to obtain information from 
which to prepare a suitable sketch 
proved fruitless. From information 
printed in Elder Potter's little souvenir 
book in 1895, we learn that Elder Curry 
was educated at Lebanon, O., and is 
now about fifty-four years of age. He 
is a good writer, a fine speaker and a 
strong doctrinal preacher and is will- 
ing to speak up and contend for what 
he believes in defiance of learned crit- 
ics who differ from him. 



D 




JOHN R. DAILY. 

Daily, Elder John R., of Indianap- 
olis, Ind. This kind-hearted, affection- 
ate and gifted preacher is a son of 
Peter and Zelia Nettie Daily, and 
was born, in Clinton County, Ind., 
Mjay 21, 1854. His parents were poor 
people, but were industrious and up- 
right, providing well for their fam- 
ily; were members of the Little Flock 
Church of Regular or Primitive Bap- 
tists and strict attendants at their 
church services, and taking their 
children with them to the house of 
God. Elder Daily had poor opportuni- 
ties to procure an education, but this 
disadvantage did not hinder him from 



gainging quite a proficiency in the 
common school branches of learning 
and many of the higher branches, as 
he was very fond of books from early 
life and made rapid progress in what- 
ever he undertook. He entered upon 
the profession of taching in the com- 
mon schools at the age of eighteen, 
which he followed for twenty-two 
years studying hard all the while to 
advance himself in the higher 
branches and especially in languages. 
After many months of conviction, he 
obtained a hope in the Saviour on the 
28th dav of February, 1870; joined the 
Little Fiock Church, January 21 1871. 
and was baptized by Elder J. T. Oli- 
phant. From the beginning of this 
public profession he exercised in pub- 
lic prayer, also leading in the singing 
service of which he was very fond. 
He was married to Miss Mary C. 
Laughner, in 1873, who lived only 
eleven weeks. In September, 1874, he 
was married the second time to Miss 
Caroline Laymon who is still his 
faithful companion. This union has 
been blessed with ten children, — one 
dying in infancy, — one — Elder O. L. 
Daily — was killed in train wreck near 
Washington, D. C, 1906; the others 
all members of their parents' church. 
Elder Daily made his first effort at 
preaching in January, 1875; was soon 
ordained and has since had the care 
cf churches to which he has closely 
and faithfully appMed himself. In 
June, 1898, he moved to Luray, Va. 
and took the position of editor and 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



81 



publisher of Zion's Advocate, which 
position he held eight years, at the 
same time serving Hawksbill, Naked 
Creek, Mt. Carmel and Alma 
churches, and traveling extensively 
among churches in Virginia and other 
states. In April, 1906, he moved to 
Indianapolis, Ind., where he now re- 
sides, and is serving as pastor of the 
church in that city and three others 
near, where also in connection with 
his sons he runs a publishing house, 
doing job work, book printing, bind- 
ing, etc. Elder Daily has published an 
interesting history of himself and 
family entitled, "Pilgrimage of a 
Stranger." Has also published a very 
acceptable Hymn and Tune Book that 
has passed the ten thousand edition. 
Elder Daily is not only a sweet singer, 
gifted preacher, strong and forceful 
writer, but is also an able debater, 
and has had several discussions with 
leading representatives of the Disci- 
ple, Universalist and other denomina- 
tions in which his brethren were well 
pleased and the truths of the Old 
School Baptist's position in doctrine 
and practice forcibly vindicated. 




OLIVER L. DAILY. 

Daily, Elder Oliver L., the oldest son 
of Elder John R. Daily, was born in 
Clinton County, Ind., August 27, 1875. 
He accompanied his parents to Virginia 
when they moved there in 1898. His 
father becoming editor and publisher 
of Zion's Advocate, he entered the 
office of that publication and mainly 
conducted the mechanical part of the 
work of that office. December, 1898, 
he was married to Miss Mamie Camp- 
bell, of Luray, Va. Two children were 
born to them, Thelma Ward and John 
Thomas. He joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church in May, 1902, and was 



baptized by his father. He began 
exercising in a public way in October, 

1902, was licensed to speak in April, 

1903, and was ordained to the full work 
of the gospel ministry in December of 
the same year. His wife died at his 
home in Luray, of consumption Jan- 
uary 22, 1905. In March, 1906, he was 
married ot Mrs. Chloe Purdy, of St. 
Louisville, Ohio. He located at Newark, 
Ohio, put his membership into the 
church at St. Louisville, and served 
that church as pastor till the time of 
his death. He, with his wife and little 
Thelma, went on a tour of preaching 
through West Virginia, Maryland, Penn- 
sylvania and Virginia. He filled his last 
appointment at Dawsonville, Md., Sun- 
day, December SO. They took the train 
at Boyd's Station that afternoon for 
Washington City, and when within 
three miles of the depot where they 
were to get off, a train of empty freight 
cars dashed into their train and they 
were all three killed in the awful 
wreck that followed. When last seen 
by Elder C. H. Waters, who left the 
same train this family was on at 
Gaithersburg, he was humming an old 
hymn and turning the leaves of his 
Bible he loved so much to study. 




J. HARVEY DAILY. 

Daily, Elder J. Harvey, of Indianap- 
olis, son of Elder John R. Daily, was 
born in Indiana, February 17, 1881. 
moved to Virginia with his parents in 
1898, united with the Primitive Baptists 
in his sixteenth year, was ordained to 
the ministry at Luray, Va., in 1904 and 
shortly afterwards moved to his pres- 
ent home where he is in the printing 
business with his father. He has the 
care of three churches and is zealous 
in the cause of truth; is satisfied with 
the doctrine and practice of the Apos- 



82 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



tolic church as contended for hy his 
honored father and wants no new. 
unauthorized thing in the dear old 
church. His churches are good to him 
and the Lord is blessing his labors. 
Elder Daily is equally interested with 
his father in the Primitive Baptist 
Hymn and Tune Book, has written 
some hymns of merit, composed sev- 
eral pieces of music, is a gifted singer 
and loves the songs of Zion and the 
simple service of our churches. 




T. S. DALTON. 

Dalton, Elder T. S., of Front Royal. 
Va., was born in Robertson County, 
Tenn, June 3, 1S46. His father— Tol- 
bert S. Dalton — died about the time of 
his birth, and his mother — whose 
maiden name was Angeline Mathews 
— was left to care for four helpless 
children, and the subject of this 
sketch, while growing to manhood, 
had to labor hard to care for himself 
and a widowed mother, and was de- 
nied the advantages of a liberal edu- 
cation. He was determined, however, 
to make the best of his limited ad- 
vantages, and when grown to man- 
hood, went to school and, afterwards, 
assisted in teaching to pay for his 
tuition. During these early days of his 
life, though in the midst of poverty. 
he was fond of the pleasures and 
amusements of the world and it was in 
the height of these amusements that 
the Lord arrested him in his wild ca- 
reer and brought him to see that he 
was a poor, guilty, helpless sinner. 
He was bowed down with a great 
burden, but God, who had begun 
the good work, did not leave him 
in this condition but revealed to 
him a great Saviour. Almost 
immediately with relief, came also 



a desire to preach, — to go and tell 
others, — of the dear Saviour he had 
found, but against this impression he 
fought hard and went so far as to 
make arrangements to take his own 
life, rather than to expose his igno- 
rance before the world. But God or- 
dered otherwise; he was led to ask 
for a home in the church, baptized 
by Elder W. W. World, and ordained 
September, 1870, by Elders W. A. 
Bowden, Wm, Howard, W. W> World, 
T. F. Harrison, S. S. Nix and T. W. 
Hutchinson. For a number of years 
after his ordination, Elder Dalton did 
the work of an evangelist, during 
which time, he baptized about seven- 
ty-five to a hundred per year. One 
year alone he baptized over three 
hundred persons. His travels in the 
Master's cause has embraced twenty- 
seven states and several territories, 
traveling thousands of miles annually, 
after the apostolic custom, without 
any guarantee from any man or body 
of men. During Elder Dalton's minis- 
try he has lived in several states, 
served about twenty-five churches and 
had twenty-eight debates. In these 
public discussions he has met some 
of the strongest men of the Arminian 
faith. Clear in argument, forceful in 
expression, resourceful in defense, the 
cause of truth has ever been upheld 
by him. In the Civil war he was a 
bold fighter in defense of the South- 
ern cause, and as a soldier of Jesus 
he has been still more zealous in de- 
fense of the principles dear to the 
heart of Primitive Baptists. For a 
number of years while located in Ten- 
nessee, he was editor and proprietor 
of a religious periodical entitled "Her- 
ald of Truth." In 1S90 he moved to 
Virginia and consolidated this paper 
with Zions Advocate and published 
same for eight years. He is now — 
1908 — the beloved pastor of Mill 
Creek, Thumb Run, Happy Creek and 
Upperville churches, and has for a 
number of years, served as Moderator 
of the Ketocton Association. 



T. B. DALTON. 

Dalton, Elder T. B., of Corinth, Miss 
son of T. S. Dalton, Sr., and Angeline 
Dalton, was born in Robertson County, 
Tenn., November 22, 1842, professed a 
hope in the Saviour in the year 1863, 
united with the Old School Baptist 
Church about 1875. and began preach- 
ing at Union City, Tenn. about the year 
1S84, was ordained a few years later 
and has since served from one to four 
churches. Elder Dalton is a brother 
of T. S. Dalton of Front Royal, Va., and, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



83 



like him, knows nothing in the eternal 
salvation of sinners save Christ and 
Him crucified. He is zealous in the 
cause of truth and truly lives in the 
hearts of his people among whom he 
labors. 



JAMES SAMUEL DAMERON. 

Dameron, Elder James Samuel, of 

North Carolina. The subject of this 
sketch was born on September 27, 
1836, and died November 15, 1907; 
was married to Miss Kate Roberts, 
1860 and was baptized into the fellow- 
ship of the Primitive Baptist Church, 
by Elder Wilson, May 1860. Prior to 
that time he was a Methodist and was 
very self-righteous. At one time he 
threatened to punish one of his school- 
mates at school because he disturbed 
him during his devotional hour. He 
would not stop and eat wild grapes 
along the road when he was hungry if 
he had not asked for them, but the 
Lord showed him that all of his right- 
eousness was as filthy rags and that he 
must be clothed in the righteousness of 
faith to see God in peace. In his 
younger days he acquired a classical 
education and after his return home 
from the war he became a teacher and 
many will remember him in that capac- 
ity. He was a man of much force and 
always did what he felt to be his duty 
with his might. During the Civil war 
he held some responsible positions. 
His life was such as to command re- 
spect from those in the church and out 
of the church so that his friends were 
very many. From the time of his ordi- 
nation in the summer of 1868, he con- 
tinued steadfastly in the apostle's 
doctrine, comforting the mourner, 
strengthening the weak, encouraging 
the diffident, for more than thirty 
years. But the servants of God, as well 
as others, are flesh and blood. Paul 
was at one time, nigh unto death; and 
all of us must die and return to the 
dust. His nervous system gave way 
and he was deprived of his reason. His 
last effort towards the public ministry 
was at Lickfork on the first Sunday in 
July, 1900. Soon after that he was 
taken to the State hospital at Morgan- 
ton. I have been informed that even 
there when his mind could be diverted 
from his nervous condition he would 
break out in preaching the blessed 
gospel. 



County, Ga., was married to Miss 
Mary Hodge, 1826, who bore him 
fourteen children. After her death 
was married to Miss Mary Denard in 
1855, who bore him nine children. 
He received a hope in Christ, joined 
the Primitive Baptists in his young 
days and was afterward set apart to 
the deacon's office, and later was li- 
censed to preach. It is said that he 
was the first man in his state that 
made a motion in church conference 
to shut the church doors against hired 
prachers. This was in Marshall 
Church, Clark County, Ga., beffore the 
Missionary trouble. He died in his 
ninety-first year in the full triumph of 
faith after a long life of usefulness. 



1*i*V 




ALFRED DANIEL. 

Daniel, Elder Alfred, of Georgia, I 
was born February 17, 1807, in Clark | 



JOHN H. DANIEL. 

Daniel, Elder John H. The subject 
of this memoir was born September 
17, 1801, in Green County, N. C, and 
died April 16, 1S73. His parents were 
Stephen and Huldah Daniel. His 
mother's maiden name was Smock. 
Elder Daniel moved from Green to 
Edgecombe County in 1S24, and set- 
tled near Tarboro. In 1825, he was 
married to Miss Maniza Long. There 
were born unto them thirteen child- 
ren. He was one of the most active 
and industrious men and a very suc- 
cessful farmer. He passed through the 
trials and vicissitudes of the late war 
among the States, with great patience 
and usefulness. He frequently visited 
the Confederate camps during that 
dreadful conflict, and administered to 
the necessities of the soldiers, and his 
services will long be remembered by 
soldiers and their families. About a 
year prior to his death he was mar- 



84 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ried the second time to Mrs. Susan 
A. Jones, of South Quay, Virginia. 
Elder Daniel was baptized by Elder 
Thomas Dupree in 1829, and united 
with the church at Conetoe, was or- 
dained deacon 1831, liberated to exer- 
cise his gifts 1833, and in 1837 was 
ordained to the work of the ministry, 
by Elders Thomas Dupree and Wil- 
liam Hyman. Elder Daniel manifested 
the same zeal and industry in the 
church that he had in worldly mat- 
ters. His house was a home at all 
times for the stranger and the needy, 
especially for his brethren in Christ. 
He served Conehoe Spring, Green, 
Great Swamp, Old Town Creek, Wi 1 -- 
son, Williams, Cross Roads and other 
churcnes during his ministry- Seldom 
do we find a minister more useful or 
zealous in the cause of truth, or more 
highly esteemed than was Elder Dan- 
iel. 



G. T. DANIEL. 



Daniel, Elder G. T., son of Elder John 
H. Daniel, was born near Tarboro, N. 
C, 1847, and died near Wilson, N. C, 
1894. He married Mary E., daughter of 
Calvin and Winnifred Woodard, 1871, 
Experiencing a hope in Christ, and 
drawn by love to the people of God, 
Brother Daniel was baptized by Elder 
C. B. Hassell, 1876. In 1877, he was li- 
censed to exercise in public. Deeply 
feeling his inability and unworthiness, 
he put off for fourteen years his im- 
pressions to preach; but he was at last 
driven, by sore and manifold trials and 
afflictions, to take up this heavy cross 
in 1891, and he was, in August, 1893 
ordained by Elders Win. A. Ross and S. 
Hassell to the administration of gospel 
ordinances. His ministry, through 
brief, was exceedingly tender and 
touching. His chief desire was to 
speak to the comfort of the afflicted 
people of God; and that desire was 
wonderfully fulfilled. The Lord rained 
down showers of blessings under the 
gracious words of His servant, and it 
was seldom, when he preached, that 
tears of love and joy did not flow 
from many eyes. The only revenge 
that he wished from any one who had 
seemed to be his enemy, was to be 
enabled to speak to his spiritual good 
and comfort. Elder Hassel says of 
him: "Our wives were sisters, and few 
persons knew him better than I; and I 
rejoice to say that not only was he a 
most industrious man but he was also 
a truthful, honest, temperate, virtuous, 
kind, gentle, humble, self-denying. God- 
fearing and God-loving man, who had 



living grace while he lived, and dying 
grace when he came to die and whose 
body, I believe, sleeps in Jesus, while 
his ransomed spirit reigns with his 
Lord in glory." 



W. R. DARDEN. 

Darden, Elder W. R., of Bailey, 
Miiss., This young minister was or- 
dained about two years ago and feels 
that there is nothing in his life worth 
mentioning except God's abounding 
love and mercy toward him. and like 
many others to whom the editor ap- 
pealed for information relative to life 
and labors, felt unworthy of notice, 
or for other reasons withheld the in- 
formation desired. 




SAMUEL L. DARK. 

Dark, Elder Samuel L., of Macomb, 
111., was born in Chatham County, N. 
C, in 1808. He was ordained Septem- 
ber 22, 1846, and ever since has been 
a devoted sacrificing servant of his 
Lord and Master, his services being 
highly appreciated by all the churches. 
He is noted even in his old age for his 
wonderful memory, This brief sketch 
from Elder Cash's book, 1896. Further 
information could not be secured. 



S. E. DAVIS. 

Davis, Elder S. E., of Iron City, Ga., 
was born in Early County, Ga., January 
1, 1S46 and died January 24, 1902. He 
was married to Miss Zelphy Boat- 
wright, December 23, 1869. To them 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



85 



were born five daughters and one son. 
The editor found it impossible to get a 
full account of Elder Davis's life and 
labors in the ministry. 



JOHN A. DAVIS. 

Davis, Elder John A., was born in 
Bullock County, Ga., 12th October, 
1812. His parents died when he was 
young and left him to battle against 
an unfriendly world. Many were the 
trials ofi his youth, but the Lord 
brought him through them all, gave 
him a sweet hope in Jesus and he 
united with Upper Black Creek 
Church in the fall of 1839, and was 
baptized by Elder Wm. Moore. He 
commenced preaching in 1855, and 
was ordained in 1859 by Elders John 
G. Williams, Andrew Kicklighter and 
Nathan Robbers, at Lower Black 
Creek, Bryant County, Ga. He was 
married to Drusilla Sikes, 2Sth June, 
1840, by whom he had twelve chil- 
dren. He married the second time to 
Mary A. Thompson, 23rd October, 
1881. He departed this life lGth June, 
1887. One who knew him well, says: 
"I do not feel able to utter half the 
praise he was entitled to. His good 
qualities were many, and to God be 
all the praise for his spotless life. He 
was a member of the church forty- 
nine years, and a minister thirty-three 
years; was a plain, straightforward 
preacher of the simple gospel of 
Christ, sound and faithful, meek and 
sincere." 



WILLIAM DAVIS. 

Davis, Elder William (1798-1883) — 
of Ashley, Mo., at the age of thirteen 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church, called Buck Creek, in Shelby 
County, Ky., and about the year 1822 
was ordained deacon and then minis- 
ter; was ordained by Elders P. J. 
Burris and others, and moved from 
Kentucky to Missouri about 1837, and 
served Siloam Church as pastor about 
forty years; was never known to 
swerve from the truth in faith or 
practice; always ready, with Bible in 
hand, which he called the "Jerusalem 
Blade," to defend the glorious doc- 
trine of the cross — salvation by grace, 
— and that alone without works or 
means. He was a faithful witness for 
Jesus and after a long life of useful- 
ness died in his eighty-sixth year, 
August, 1883. 



HENRY DAVIS. 

Davis, Elder Henry (1843-1906) first 
united with the United Baptist organi- 
zation, but soon the Lord impressed 
him with the feeling that he was not 
in the Church of Christ. For quite a 
while he was greatly troubled, was led 
about and instructed by Him who leads 
the blind by a way they know not. He 
left his former connection and united 
with the Old School Baptists where he 
remained until his death. He was bap- 
tized by Elder Gabriel Riffe, soon or- 
dained to the work of the ministry and 
was an humble, faithful soldier of 
Jesus. 



JOHN H. DAVIS. 

Davis, Elder John H., of Terrall 
County, La., born September 22, 1834, 
and died May 12, 1888. He was mar- 
ried to Amanda Daniel November 15, 
1857; united with the Primitive Bap- 
tists at Beulah Church, 1872; was 
baptized by Elder T. K. Pursley and 
ordained to the work of the ministry, 
1873, by Elders W. Hubbard and J. J. 
Davis. He was a sound, doctrinal 
preacher — always contending for free 
and sovereign grace. He served his 
home church from the time of his or- 
dination until his death and also served 
other churches. As a man, he was high- 
ly esteemed by the people of his com- 
munity; was a good and loving hus- 
band, a kind and affectionate father, 
an humble and devoted christian. He 
loved the truth as believed and preach- 
ed by Primitive Baptists, and was a 
strong believer in the doctrine of elec- 
tion and the covenant of grace. He 
expressed a willingness to die and be 
with Jesus his Saviour. 



COLEMAN B. DAWSON. 

Dawson, Elder Coleman B. (1808- 
1890), of Illinois. After nearly forty 
years in the ministry, Elder Dawson 
fell at his post in the full triumphs of 
faith in his eighty-second year of age. 
He was born in Stafford County, Va., 
emigrated with his parents when about 
nine years old to Kentucky; united 
with the Primitive Baptists at Elk 
Creek Church, Ky. in his fourteenth 
year; removed to Clark County, 111., 
and placed his membership with Con- 
cord Church in 1834, where he Was 
ordained as deacon in 184S; licensed 
to preach in 1851 and ordained in 1853' 
by Elders John Shields.Joel Vermillion 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



and Reason Martin. Until his death he 
was in the service of churches and was 
very faithful in the discharge of every 
duty. His service was without proper 
compensation, though cheerfully rend- 
ered, and he labored very hard for the 
support of his family. He traveled but 




COLEMAN B. DAWSON 

little preferring to labor among the 
churches near home. He was highly 
regarded by his neighbors and one who 
did not believe his doctrine said of him 
after his death that "his life had been 
a sermon." 



L. J. DEBERRY. 

Deberry, Elder L. J., was born in 
Edgecombe County, N. C, April 16, 
1834. His parents were members of 
the Methodist Church and he was 
taught to believe their doctrine and 
when about sixteen years of age was 
sprinkled, received into the church 
and remained for about eight years. 
But God, who in the New Covenant, 
writes His law on the mind and in the 
heart, began to teach himl, revealed 
to him his lost and ruined condition 
in self and self-righteousness, gave 
him a hope in Jesus and a desire 
to follow Him in baptism. Not being 
much acquainted with the Baptists he 
was led into the Disciple Church and 
baptized by immersion by them, but 
soon became dissatisfied with their 
doctrine, began a careful study of his 
Bible, and left them in about eigh- 
teen months. In 1870 at the Kehukee 
Association he heard Elder St. 
John of New York, preach, which was 
food to his soul, was made to feel it 
his duty to join the church but Cor 



twelve years was disobedient. How 
ever, he was made willing by God's 
power, united with the Baptists in 
1882, and was baptized by Elder J. W. 
Johnson. He was soon licensed and 
later was ordained by Elders D. W. 
Tapping and David Carter. He is at 
present serving the church in Bath, 
N. C., which was organized by him; 
is in his seventy-fifth year of age, 
strong in the faith with a precious 
hope of eternal life. 



REMER DEKLE. 

Dekle, Elder Remer, was born in 

Emanuel County, Ga., February 9, 1858 
and died January 13, 1903. He was a 
son of John and Mary Dekle. His 
mother was a devoted Baptist. His 
father was not a member of any chris- 
tian order. However, he seemed to 
love the truth. Elder Dekle was reared 
on the farm and was talented for that 
occupation. After his marriage he 
moved to Bullock County Ga., and be- 
gan farming on a scientific plan, using 
improved implements and being 
economical, he made a success in life. 
While young he loved the dancing floor 
and many other amusements. Never- 
theless he was moral and seemed to be 
blessed with a pious nature. He was 
married to Mary Jane Bowen, 1879; 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Lower Lots Creek in 1880, 
ordained to the office of deacon in 1895, 
and filled that office to the satisfaction 
of his brethren. Soon after his estab- 
lishment as deacon he began to exhort 
his brethren, and to admonish them to 
duty. Following on this line for some 
time he at length expressed himself as 
feeling to have a call to preach the 
word. His church, having all confidence 
in his sincerity, liberated him to exer- 
cise his gift wherever the Spirit di- 
rected. He was a constant visitor to 
the churches in his neighborhood and 
on account of his faithfulness and in- 
tegrity he soon won the respect and 
confidence of his brethren in all the 
churches. He was ordained as elder 
in 1902. The relation of his call to the 
ministry struck the brotherhood with 
great force, and many tears of joy were 
shed on that memorable occasion. He 
was faithful in his call, and earnestly 
contended for f thQ Primitive faith, 
begging his brethren to stand by the 
old land-marks and live in righteaous- 
ness. At the time of his death he was 
serving two churches, Nevil Creek, and 
his home church, Lower Lots Creek. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



87 



MOSES HAMPTON DENMAN. 

Denman, Elder Moses Hampton. 
This faithful minister was born in 
Franklin County, Ga., in 1802, and 
was brought up on a farm. His pa- 
rents taught' him honesty and indus- 
try. He was naturally bright, intel- 
lectually, and made good use of his 
limited opportunities for an educa- 
tion. Early in life he joined the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church and was soon 
ordained to the full work of ministry. 
About the year 1833, or '34, he moved 
and settled near Marietta, Cobb Coun- 
ty, Ga. About that time trouble arose 
in the church on the Mission ques- 
tion. He contended for the word of 
God, "Stand ye in the ways, and see, 
and ask for the old paths, where is 
the good way, and walk therein, and 
ye shall find rest for your souls," 
Jerm. 6:16. Elder Denman proved 
himself a valliant soldier of the cross 
by following the "old paths" and con- 
tending alone for the doctrine and 
practice of the Bible. In 1850 he mov- 
ed to Texas and settled in Bell Coun- 
ty, where he remained until his Mast- 
er's call to come home, February, 
1885. Elder Denman was a faithful 
minister for more than half a cen- 
tury and proved his faith by his 
works. 




MOSES DEWITT DENMAN. 

Denman, Elder Moses De Witt(Mj. D.), 
son of Jackson H. and Ann W. Denman 
was born at Lavissa, Cherokee Coun- 
ty, Texas, August 11, 1850, and died 
January 8, 1907. In early childhood he 
greatly enjoyed the company and con- 
versation of Christian people, and 



was ofttn moved to tears when the 
subject" of Jesus and His crucifixion 
was mentioned. He was never married 
but remained with his parents and 
proved a dutiful son; acquired a liber- 
al education, taught school and earn- 
ed money with which to attend col- 
lege and graduated with honors in the 
medical department of the University 
of Tennessee; located in Beel County, 
Texas, and practiced medicine for fif- 
teen or twenty years. In 1865 he pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ, joined the 
Old School Baptists at Cedar Grove 
Church and was baptized by his 
grandfather, Elder Moses H Denman; 
was licensed to preach and in the lat- 
ter part of his life gave up his chosen 
profession in order to be free to 
travel, speak and write of Jesus and 
His salvation; moved to Beaver Coun- 
ty, Oklahoma, in 1904, and soon after 
began the publication of the Old 
School Baptist Quarterly. He was 
very zealous in the cause of truth 
and on his deathbed told his brothers 
that he wanted all his property used 
for the benefit of the Old School Bap- 
tists. His writings are published in 
book form and can be had of A. W. 
Denman, Tyrone, Oklahoma. 



EDMUND DENNISON. 

Dennison, Elder Edmund, of Jack- 
sonville, W. Va., was born in Fauquier 
County, 1799, removed to Harrison 
County, now West Virginia, with his 
parents, when about seven years of 
age, and lived in Harrison County 
until 1876, and removed thence to his 
son's, in Lewis County, W. Va., where 
he spent the remainder of his life. He 
joined the Old School Baptist Church, 
and was baptized July 4, 1829, and 
lived a worthy, consistent member 
among them until his death — never 
having a single charge brought 
against him in any way. He was 
licensed to preach November 17, 1832, 
and ordained soon thereafter; was 
chosen pastor of Mount Zion Church, 
1840, which position he filled to the 
perfect satisfaction of all the church, 
and was well beloved and highly re- 
spected by all Old School Baptists as 
far as his acquaintance reached. He 
possessed a meek, quiet, and peace- 
able disposition. His labors were 
principally in West Virginia and 
Pennsylvania. In his ministry he was 
firm and established in the doctrines 
of God, our Saviour, holding forth 
Jesus Christ and him crucified, the 
way, the truth, and the life, sound in 
the faith and firm in support of the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



truth, and in opposition to every false 
way, he seemed determined to know 
nothing among the people save Jesus 
and him crucified. 




GABRIEL DENNY. 

Denny, Elder Gabriel, of Pinnacle, 
N. O, was born December 20, 1842, 
raised on a farm, entered the South- 
ern army in his twentieth year, had a 
great desire to do good from his 
youth and felt he was getting on very 
well with God and man. But in April, 
1862, he was convicted of sin, shown 
the corruption of his heart, the ex- 
ceeding sinfulness of sin and for 
about two years had no deliverance 
from Mt. Sinai's fiery law. But he 
who brought him in this condition re- 
vealed to him that "salvation is of the 
Lord," gave him a hope in Jesus and 
put a new song of praise in his 
mouth. He united with the church, 
given a dispensation of the gospel, 
was ordained and has since had the 
care of churches. Elder Denny is now 
serving Ararat, Volunteer, Rock 
Spring and Liberty churches, is faith- 
ful and zealous, desires to live sober- 
ly, righteously and Godly in this pres- 
ent world and end his pilgrimage with 
joy. 



A. M. DENNY. 

Denny, Elder A. M., of Pinnacle, N. 
C. Elder Denny is the beloved Moder- 
ator of the Fisher's River Association 
and has for about forty years had the 
care of one or more churches of this 
Association. He was born in Surry 
County, N. G, April 19, 1847, became 



subject to military duty in 18G4, 
joined the Southern army, was captur- 
ed by Union forces, sent to prison 
at Camp Douglas, Chicago, and while 
in prison, in the month of December, 
1864, first saw the exceeding sinful- 
ness of sin and convicted of it. On his 
return home after the war he pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ, joining the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Ararat, 
and was baptized by Elder John Jones 
in May, 1866. He made his first at- 
tempt to preach June, 1867, and was 




A. M. DENNY 

in 1869 ordained by Elders Hugh 
Jones, N. Alberty, T. J. Lawton, John 
Jones, Wm Moran, A. Moran, H. Cain 
and Wm. B. Gates, Elder Denny has 
served Fisher's River Association as 
assistant clerk seven years, clerk 
twenty-eight years and Moderator 
since 1905. He has married more than 
a hundred couples, baptized many 
persons into the fellowship of the 
churches and is highly esteemed by 
his people. 



O. J. DENNY. 

Denny, Elder O. J., son of Elder 
Gabriel Denny, of Greensboro, N. C, 
was born November 30, 1871; united 
with Primitive Baptists 1893; ordain- 
ed to the gospel ministry in 1904 by 
the church at Pilot mountain; moved 
to Greensboro in 1904, and became a 
member of the church at Greensboro 
when organized in November, 1907. 
Elder Denny is well beloved and is 
a promising gift to the church. He 
modestly writes of himself: "I am 
serving Greensboro and Deep Creek 
churches as pastor and other ap- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



89 



pointments are made as often as ex- 
pedient. I have but little to say of my- 
self or my accomplishments, but 




O J. DENNY 

much to say of the wisdom, power and 
dominion of God. If I glory I must 
glory in the Lord." 




C. F. DENNY. 

Denny, Elder C. F., of Greensboro, 
N. C, was born in Surry County, N. 
C, March the 14th, 1869; united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church at Pilot 
mountain, May the 29th, 1S99; was or- 
dained to the v.ork of the ministry 
December 26, 1904. He is now serving 
jointly with his brother, Elder O. J. 
Denny the church at Greensboro, N. 
C. This church holds services every 
Sunday. Elder Denny also has the 



care of Lick Fork Church, one of the 
oldest organizations in this part of 
the state. He is satisfied with the doc- 
trine and practice of the Apostolic 
church as maintained by the great 
body of Primitive or Old School Bap- 
tists and wants no new, unauthorized 
things in the church. 



J. C. DENTON. 

Denton, Elder J. C, of Maud, Texas, 
was born in Paulding County, Ga., 
Ju.y 2, 1845, was baptized into the 
fellowship of Raman Church, in Fay- 
ette County, by Elder Johnson Pate in 
November, 1865, was ordained to the 
ministry in Freestone County, Texas, 
by Elders James Beaver, and G. YV. 
McDonald in May, 1871. His first ser- 
mon was preached the second Sunday 
in March, 1869, from Heb. 4:8, 9; his 
fortieth anniversary sermon (second 
Sunday in March, 1909,), from 2 Tim. 
4:1, 2; as a minister he was born in 
the beginning of the conflict between 
Elder Ben Parker (advocate of Par- 
kerite Twoseedism") and Elder J. T. 
Seely (strong opposer of said doc- 
trine) and he (Denton) became in- 
volved in that conflict, and in a writ- 
ten discussion obtained such expres- 
sions from Elder Parker as greatly 
conduced to a definite statement of 
said heresy and made its exposure the 
more easy. From that time Two-Seed- 
ism began to lose its stronghold 
among the Primitive Baptists of 
Texas, and is now almost extinct. In 
1896 Elder Denton publiciy took the po- 
sition that there is neither precedent 
nor example in the New Testament 
for that institution among Primitive 
Baptists known as "organized asso- 
ciations." And as he does not make 
his views on this question a test of 
fellowship, they are sustained by our 
leading elders generally. But this is 
not to oppose annual associational 
meetings for the worship of God and 
the mutual edification of the saints. 
Elder Denton is an able writer and a 
frequent correspondent of our relig- 
ious papers and his conciliatory posi- 
tion on various mooted questions have 
been endorsed by most of our ablest 
Elders among them such ministers as 
Hassell, Oliphant, Thompson, Dalton. 
Chick and Waters. Elder H. White, 
an old associate in the ministry, was 
long and deeply impressed that upon 
Eider Denton would be laid the work 
of reconciliation between divided 
Baptists (especially in Texas), and 
just a short while before his death 



90 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



visited him especially to encourage 
him in that undertaking. This being 
in harmony with Elder Denton's own 
mind, he has for many months been 
in the fie'd, and humbly and quietly 
working in that way, and has met 
with reasonable encouragement. A 
door seems to have been opened unto 
him as never before, and he humbly 
hopes that his last work on earth may 
be that of the peacemaker. "Blessed 
are the peacemakers." 



THOMAS DICKENS. 

Dickens, Elder Thomas (1814-1908), 
of Virginia, was born in Brayson 
County, Va., joined the Primitive Bap- 
tists at Laurel Fork, about 1837, was 
baptized by Elder William Lawson, 
and commenced preaching about 1853. 
Was licensed in 1855 and ordained in 
1856, by Elders William Lawson, Dan- 
iel Conner,, Claiborne Plaster, and 
Thomas S. Vass. He was chosen pas- 
tor of Indian Creek, Concord, New 
Hope, Fellowship and Panther Creek 
churches, and labored among many 
others; was clerk of the New River 
Association for a long period of time, 
and was later chosen moderator of 
the Association. He served as moder- 
ator until he was eighty years of age. 
Elder Dickens was very successful in 
the ministry, and a safe and consider- 
ate counsellor. He preached till he 
was ninety years of age, and was in 
the ministry about fifty years. He 
taught school for a number of years, 
was once a land assessor, and a good 
farmer. He was a great entertainer, 
given to hospitality and a peacemak- 
er. His favorite admonition in his old 
age was to remember our Creator in 
the days of our youth, before the 
days of affliction or evil come, when 
we will be too old and feeble to enjoy 
meeting our brethren, or to see them 
or to preach or to hear preaching. 
During the Civil war and for a while 
thereafter, he stood almost alone in 
defense of the Primitive faith in his 
section. After peace had smiled on 
our land., he had great joy to see 
many corning home to the church, 
and the broken walls of Zion built up 
again. He died in the ninety-fourth 
year of his age, full of faith and hope. 

AMOS DICKERSON. 

Dickerson, Elder Amos, was born in 
Floyd County, Va., May 16, 1832. He 
is of a sturdy stock of citizenship 



characterized by their industry, hon- 
esty and unswerving integrity. His 
early opportunities were limited so 
that he grew to manhood with but. 
little or no education, and with only 
muscle and brain with which to wage 
the battle of life. In 1850 he married 
Miss Maxy Slusher, who, though she 
never joined the church, was a com- 
panion indeed,, entering with full sym- 
pathy into the struggles of life with 
her husband, and like thousands of 




AMOS DICKERSON 

Southern wives and mothers, while 
the husband and father was in the 
army she went to the field and by the 
sweat of her face supplied her chil- 
dren with bread. Elder Dickerson pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ and joined 
the Primitive Baptist Church at 
White Oak Grove, Floyd County, Va., 
in January, 1852, and was baptized by 
Elder Owen Sumner. Early in the war 
he enlisted in 54th Va. Regiment and 
served his state for more than three 
years. While thus engaged as a sol- 
dier of his country he was being en- 
listed as a soldier of the cross, there- 
fore having returned from the Civil 
strife in December, 1865, he began 
to exercise a gift in the ministry, and 
in 1867 he was ordained to the full 
functions of the gospel ministry. His 
services were soon in liberal demand 
both to the service of churches as. 
pastor and to preach in places be- 
yond. In at least three places the 
brush was cleared away, a rude stand 
was erected and he preached the gos- 
pel to the people, and baptized those 
who evidenced a work off faith, and 
churches were established at these 
places, and for nearly forty years he 
served from three to five churches. 
His has been truly the work of a pas- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



91 



tor. It required a travel on horseback 
a distance of 128 miles a month to 
serve the churches of his charge. 
Among the many whom he has bap- 
tized are six elders, viz: P. G. Lester, 
David Sumner, Wm. F. Simmons, Z. 
T. Turner, H. V. Cole and C. W. 
Vaughn, and might well be called a 
pastor of elders, there being as many 
as ten who held their membership in 
churches which he served. He also 
was favored to baptize his aged father 
at the age of 87. At one time he serv- 
ed his county in the legislature for 
six successive years. He is now in the 
seventy-seventh year of his age and 
in his declining years he is yet active 
in the ministry of the word to the edi- 
fication of the saints, and enjoys 
abiding assurances of the confidence 
of the brethren and of the people 
among whom he dwells as minister 
and citizen. 



J. J. DICKSON. 

Dickson, Elder J. J., was a native of 
Georgia, but came to Alabama when 
young, and was even then a very 
promising and popular minister, as 
well as an energetic and prosperous 
farmer. He was a Baptist before the 
division, but when the sifting came 
was left steadfastly with the Old or- 
der of Baptists. He was quite a con- 
soling and comforting preacher to 
many poor and disconsolate ones of 
the flock of God. But with all his excel- 
lencies and gifts by grace, he was but 
a man of infirmity like his brethren 
He was naturally peculiarly sensitive, 
easily hurt in his feelings and hard to 
get over it. And this peculiar trait ot 
his nature soon had abundant oppor- 
tunities for development and growth 
by the peculiar trials he had to meet. 
Suffice it to say that he got into trou- 
ble both with men of the world and 
with his church, which resulted in 
his exclusion, and for twelve years 
he was so completely turned over to 
Satan that he thought all Primitive 
Baptists were his enemies, and ac- 
tually tried to cultivate hatred rather 
than love for them. But eventually 
the Lord brought him to repentance, 
and he went to the church in Bulloch 
County, Ala., and made full satisfac- 
tion and was heartily restored, and 
obtaining a letter he became a mem- 
ber at Bethlehem, near Notasulga, 
Macon County, Ala., and there re- 
mained until he moved four years ago 
to Georgia, preaching around among 
some of the churches with whom he 
had labored in his more youthful days 



in the ministry. After about sixty 
years in the ministry, and bearing 
many trials and hardships, he sudden- 
ly fell asleep in Jesus, February 28, 
1892. 



S. M. DICKEY. 

Dickey, Elder S. M. (1825-1903), of 
Virginia, was a useful man in his day 
and generation. When the Civil war 
broke out, he raised a company oi 
volunteers, was elected captain, join- 
ed the 51st Virginia Regiment, soon 
promoted to major, and served as a 
member of the House of Delegates. 
He was a good soldier, honored citi- 
zen and kind neighbor. In 1866 he was 
convicted of sin, given a sweet hope 
in Jesus and united with the church 
at Saddle Creek, and was baptized by 
Elder Wm. Halsey; was ordained as 
deacon in 1867, and ordained to the 
work of the ministry in 1869. His con- 
version was wonderful and his service 
as a minister full of zeal and love for 
the cause of truth. He fought a good 
fight. 



JESSE DOBBS. 

Dobbs, Elder Jesse, who died a few 
years ago, was a member of the Tom- 
bigby Association, and served 
churches within the bounds of this 
association most of his life. He was 
a great sufferer from rheumatism and 
did not travel among the churches 
much; was sound in the faith, and be- 
loved by his flock. A full sketch of his 
life couM not be obtained by the editor. 




WILLIAM DODD. 

Dodd, Elder William (1811-1891), of 
Ohio, was born near Rathfrieland, 



92 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Ireland, and became a Baptist before 
coming to tbe United States. After 
coming to tbis country he sought out 
the people of his faith, and remained 
identified with them as long as he 
lived. He -was very firm and uncom- 
promising on doctrine, and the editor 
regrets that data for a complete 
sketch of his life and labors could not 
be obtained. 



GEORGE DOUGLAS. 

Douglas, Elder George, of North 
Carolina, was noted for his piety, or- 
derly walk and godly conversation as 
well as for his ability as a minister of 
the Old School order. He was born 
1792 and when about thirty years or 
age united with Little River Church, 
in Ash County, N. C. was soon bur- 
dened with a dispensation of the gos- 
pel, and ordained in 1S2S. Some years 
after this — about 1S34 — he was leu 
away by the New School Baptists in 
the division — received an appointment 
from a Missionary Board to preach 
one year, but during the time, he be- 
came alarmed by seeming to lose the 
spirit of preaching, and like the prod- 
igal son, remembered his Father's 
house, returned to his former church 
relationship, made acknowledgements 
of his error, and was restored in full 
fellowship. He was for a long number 
of years Moderator of the Mountain 
District Association, and greatly be- 
loved by his people. He died in 1874, 
at a ripe old age, crowned with a long, 
useful and loyal stewardship. 



IRA E. DOUTHIT. 

Douthit, Elder Ira E., died at his 
home in Dorans' Cove, Jackson Coun- 
ty, Ala,, on March 25. 1S96, at the age 
of eighty-seven years. At the time of 
his death his membership was with 
the church at South Pittsburg, Tenn. 
His ministerial work was mostly in 
the bounds of the Sequachee Valley 
Association. Further particulars of his 
life and labors were not obtainable. 



ADAM F. DOVE. 

Dove, Elder Adam F., of Van Buren, 
O.. was born in Rockingham County, 
Va. March 28, 1S53. united in marriage 
with Adaline M. Spitler in 1S77, and 
both were baptized into the fellowship 



of the Primitive Baptist Church at 
Honey Creek, O., September, 1877, and 
still have their names there, among 
those who so warmly welcomed them in 
the church more than thirty-one years 
ago. He was ordained to the work of 
the ministry by a council called by this 
church in April 1892. He is now pastor 
of four churches, all of which are very 
dear to him and claim his earnest de- 
sires for their good and are in peace 
and prosperity. Elder Dove was given 
a precious hope in Jesus in July, 1877. 
The arrows of conviction sank deep 
into his soul and long and severe had 
been the struggle in a futile effort to 




ADAM F. DOVE 

gain the favor of God by works, but at 
last in the darkest hour of his life 
light penetrated his being and his soul 
was made to praise God in the highest 
ecstacy of joy. From then until now 
hope has been as an anchor to his soul, 
and as age approaches and the warn- 
ings of his dissolution sounds in his 
ear he still finds the remembrances of 
Gods' mercies and his never failing 
promises to all those who love him a 
sure foundation upon which to rest his 
hope of heaven. He writes: "Should 
my days yet be many or few 'tis my 
desire to spend them all in the service 
of my Master and his humble follow- 
ers." 



B. J. DRIVER. 

Driver, Elder B. J., of Salem, Texas, 
is an able minister of the New Tes- 
tnient. He is Moderator of the Duffau 
Association of Primitive Baptists of 
Texas, and serves Ebenezer and oth- 
er churches of this association. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



93 



J. H. DRAPER. 

Draper, Elder J. H. (1846-1903), of 
Arkansas, was born in the state of 
Mississippi; Joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Big Springs, Miss., 
in the year 1887, and after two years 
was liberated to preach ■ the gospel. 
In the year 1893 he moved to Drew 
County, Ark., and was received into 
the church at Ephesus by letter, and 
in a short time was called to the pas- 
toral care of the church at Antioch 
in Bradley County, Ark., not being or- 
dained the church at Antioch called 
for his ordination. He then being or- 
dained in due tinne; and in the year 
1895 his membership was carried by 
letter to Antioch, where he remained 
until his death. He was faithful to his 
charge and was, without provident- 
ially hindered, at his post of duty, 
thus setting a good example for oth- 
ers. 




J. D. DRAUGHN. 

Draughn, Elder J. D., of Mt. Airy, N. 
C. was born in Surry County, Decem- 
ber 5, 1845; raised on the farm, en- 
tered the Southern army, 1863, and 
served until the close of the war. In 
1870, became concerned about his sin- 
ful condition by nature and was, the 
following year, given a hope in the Sav- 
iour, and united with the Baptists at 
Stuarts Creek. Soon he was impressed 
with the duty of preaching and was, in 
1874, ordained by Elders John Jones, 
T. J. Lawson, A. M. Denny and others. 
Elder Draughn has since had the care 
of churches, has baptized between two 
and three hundred, gathered together 
and organized three new churches, and 
assisted in organization of three others 



has visited churches and preached 
among our people in many states, trav- 
eling about nine thousand miles by 
rail and thousands of miles by private 
conveyances and on foot in this serv- 
ice. He is in his sixty-fourth year and 
desires to press forward in work of the 
Master and to finish his course with 
joy and in honor to his name. 



L. F. DUDLEY. 

Dudley, Elder L. F., of North 
Pleasureville, Ky., is the beloved Mod- 
erator of the Mt. Pleasant Associa- 
tion of the Regular Baptists of Ken- 
tucky, and the faithful pastor of 
churches within this locality. It is re- 
gretted that a more extended notice 
could not be given of his life and la- 
bors. 




JAS. W. DUDLEY. 

Dudley, Elder Jas. W., of Missouri, 
was born in Fayette County, Ky., 
June 12, 1S07, and was married to 
Miss Virginia Russell December 15, 
1831. He united w ith the church at 
Bryan's, near Lexington, Ky., and was 
baptized by Elder T. P. Dudley in the 
year 1836. Subsequently to this, hav- 
ing removed his residence to Rich- 
mond, Madison County, he commenc- 
ed his labors in the ministry in that 
locality and on a call from the church 
at Bethel, in the same county, he was 
examined by a presbytery concerning 
his call from God and qualifications 
for the ministry, and was set apart to 
the work thereof, and to the pastorate 
of that church, May 24, 1845. From that 
time until his death June 30, 1S80, he 
was in the service of his Master, and 
faithful till the end. 



94 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MLNTISTERS 




AMBROSE DUDLEY. 

Dudley, Elder Ambrose, of Ken- 
tncky, was born 1753 in Virginia; re- 
ceived a hope in Christ and joined 
the Old Baptist Church of Christ dur- 
ing the war of the Revolution and 
pretty soon embarked in the gospel 
ministry.. In the Spring of 1786 he 
moved to Kentucky, settling near 
Bryan's Station, Fayette County; be- 
ing ordained to the work of the min- 
istry before leaving Virginia. He de- 
voted a great deal of his time to 
preaching the gospel and his labors 
were greatly blessed to the gathering 
in, organizing and building up visible 
churches till his death which occur- 
red January 27, 1825, in his seventy- 
third year of age. He left a family of 
fourteen children — eleven sens and 
three daughters — all of whom mar- 
ried, eleven joined the church with 
him, as also a number of their grand- 
children and great-grandchildren. His 
influence was great for good and he 
was highly esteemed as a man and a 
minister. 



THOS. P. DUDLEY. 

Dudley, Elder Thos. P., of Kentucky, 
This eminent minister was born May 
31, 1792; joined the American army 
and was in the war of 1812, was severe- 
ly wounded in battle January 18, 1813 
and captured by the Indians, miracu- 
lously saved from being tomahawked 
by them, found favor with the chief, 
ransomed by a British officer and by 
many unexpected favors received from 
strangers, arrived home, recovered, 
and was with General Jackson in the 
famous battle of New Orleans, January 



8, 1815. Writing to his father of this 
battle he said: "The Lord has blessed 
us with one of the most signal victories 
ever achieved." Previous to and dur- 
ing the year 1818", he was under severe 
conviction for sin, a most interesting 
account of which is published in the 
Primitive Monitor, February, 1907. He 
was brought to rejoice in Christ as a 
Saviour, and was, in March, 1820, re- 




THOS. P. DUDLEY 

ceived into the fellowship of the Bryan 
Church and baptized by his father, 
Elder Ambrose Dudley. He soon after 
began preaching and was ordained to 
the full functions of the gospel min- 
istry and for more than half a century 
was a faithful, zealous and able min- 
ister. He died in his ninety-second 
year of age in the full triumphs of a 
living faith. 



E. S. DUDLEY. 

Dudley, Elder E. S. (1811-1891), 
died at his home near Hutchison, Ky., 
aged eighty years, three months and 
ten days. The Lord blessed him with 
a good hope through grace in early 
life and led him to take up his cross 
in joining the Old Baptist Church at 
Bryan Station, Ky., 1S35. He was bap- 
tized by his uncle, Thomas P. Dudley, 
and remained a consistent mem- 
ber of Bryans till the trouble 
arose on the subject of regeneration 
when he (with others) was dismissed 
by certificate April, 1849, and joined 
tne Old Baptist Church at Stony 
Point, Burbon County, Ky., May of the 
same year. He was ordained to the 
gospel ministry June 20, 1854, in the 
presence of Elders W. Lauck, of Vir- 
ginia; S. Williams, of Ohio; Rickets, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



95 



Anderson, Gossett, J. WJ. Dudley, Con- 
rad, Stephens, Rash and John Gilbert 
of Kentucky. He was an able, faithful 
minister of Jesus and in his whole 
ministry ever guarded against any 
system of doctrine that reflected upon 
the purity and holiness of God as op- 
posed to sin, or that detracted from 
the truth that the sinner was the sub- 
ject of regeneration and salvation, 
and that salvation was purely by the 




E. S. DUDLEY 

grace and mercy of God. As his end 
grew near he became more and more 
anxious that some one in harmony 
with his sentiments in the gospel 
should be round to lift up the stand- 
ard of truth when he was called 
home. He was enabled before his 
death to have this prayer answered 
when Elder J. J. Gilbert was called to 
serve churches in his locality. 



J. R. DUKES. 

Dukes, Elder J. R., of Dukes, Fla., is 
the beloved Moderator of the Suwanee 
Association of the Primitive Baptists 
of Florida, and the faithful pastor of 
churches within the bounds of this 
association. Data for a more suitable 
notice could not be obtained. 



M. W. DUMAS. 

Dumas, Elder M. W., of Texas, was 
born in Monroe County. Ga., May 6, 
1830, and died October 6, 1908, in the 



seventy-ninth year of his age. He was 
blessed with a sweet hope in Jesus in 
his eighteenth year and united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church. Some time 
after this he moved to Arkansas, then 
to Louisiana and in 1874, he moved to 
Lampasso County, Texas, and was in 
the constitution of Sardis church in 
1876. Getting letters from Sardis he 
and his wife were in the constitution 
of Bethlehem Church in 1877, and in 
1884, was ordained by this church. 
Until the end of his life he was a 
faithful soldier of the Cross and was 
highly esteemed as a Primitive Bap- 
tist minister. During his last illness he 
expressed in the most convincing man- 
ner, his full assurance of the truthful- 
ness of the doctrine he had preached. 
Having preached it to others in life he 
was willing to rest upon it in death. 




JAMES DUNCAN. 

Duncan, Elder James, of Ripley, Tenn. 
This able minister of the New Testa- 
ment is Moderator of the Review Bap- 
tist Association of Primitive Baptists 
and is the faithful pastor of New Salem, 
Pleasant Hill and other churches. He 
is associate editor of the Baptist Trum- 
pet, a lover of peace and earnest work- 
er in the Master's vineyard. The editor 
regrets that a more extended notice of 
his life and labors could not appear. 



R. W. DURDEN, 

Durden, Elder R. W. was born in 
Emmanuel County, Ga., January 8, 1827, 
and died August 11, 1900. Too much 
cannot be said for him by way of 
commendation. He was an honorable 
hightoned gentleman in every sense of 



96 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



the word, a most excellent citizen, a 
faithful kind husband and father in 
his family. He represented his county 
in the Georgia legislature one term 
with credit to himself and to the grati- 
fication of his constituents. He was 
married to Miss Lydia Burnett, Decem- 
ber 21, 1852. To this union were born 
ten children. Elder Durden joined the 
church at Antioch in May, 1857 — some 
time after he commenced exercising 
in public, and was ordained to the min- 
istry February 17, 1877, by Elders D. 
J. Lamb and Moses Daniel. He beauti- 
fully adorned his profession by a holy 
walk, setting such examples before his 
family and the people generally as are 
worthy of imitation. As a minister he 
was faithful to warn the unruly and un- 
godly against ungodliness, to comfort 
the saints and feed the flock of God 
which He purchased with His own 
blood. And thus he proved his faith by 
his works, fought a good fight and fin- 
ished his course with joy. 




SILAS H. DURAND. 

Durand, Elder Silas H., cf South- 
ampton, Pa., son of Daniel and Ase- 
nath Durand, was born in Bradford 
County, Pa., June 5, 1S33, and was the 
eleventh in a family of fourteen chil- 
dren. His childhood and early youth 
were spent on his father's farm. In 
his eighteenth year, he began teach- 
ing, and in 185S entered the law office 
of Hon. H. P. Wright, of Wilesbarre, 
Pa., for the purpose of studying law. 
In 1860 he was admitted to the bar, 
and entered upon what promised to 
be a very successful business career. 
In 1863 he united with the Presbyte- 
rian Church in Wilkesbarre. In May, 
1864 he received a hope of eternal 



life, and was the following month re- 
ceived into the fellowship of the Old 
School Baptist Church of Middletown 
and Walkill, and was baptized by 
Elder Gilbert Beebe. After a short 
visit at his father's home he returned 
to Wilkesbarre, fully expecting to 
continue the practice of his profes- 
sion as a life work. But the things of 
the Kingdom pressed with such 
weight upon his mind, that he was led 
to mention this in a letter to Elder 
Beebe, who at once told him the 
church had thought he had been call- 
ed of God to preach, and were only 
waiting for him' to know it. On Sep- 
tember 4, 1864, he was licensed and 
on November following he closed his 
legal work, and in December was or- 
dained to the full work of the minis- 
try. His first Work was traveling 
among the churches, doing the work 
of an evangelist for about three years. 
After this he served at one time six 
churches that were widely separated 
from each other, traveling about 16,- 
000 miles a year in the work July 5, 
1882, he was married to Miss Clarice 
E. Pusey, a member of the church at 
Hartford, • Md. April 12, 1884, he ac- 
cepted a call to the church at South- 
ampton, Pa., and moved there Septem- 
ber following, where he still remains. 
He is also pastor of a church in Salis- 
bury, Md., and one in South River, 
N. J. In 1867 Elder Durand published 
"The Trial of Job," a very clear expo- 
sition of the truth as taught in that 
remarkable Bible narrative, and later 
a volume of '"Meditations on Portions 
of the Word." In connection with his 
sister, Miss Bessie Durand, he pub- 
lished Reminiscences and Letters of 
Mary Parker, which became a very 
acceptable source of revenue to her 
in her last years, as well as a source 
of comfort and spiritual help to the 
large number who read it. In collabo- 
ration with Elder P. G. Lester of 
Floyd, Va., he edited a Hymn and 
Tune Book for use in Primitive Bap- 
tist Churches, which has been adopt- 
ed by a great number of them, and 
quite generally regarded as accepta- 
ble. Elder Durand is a lovely man, an 
able preacher, fluent writer and bold 
defender of salvation by grace. He is 
a highly esteemed gift to the church, 
and his labor of love and devotion to 
the cause of truth greatly appreciated 
by his brethren. 



JAMES DUVAL. 

Duval, Elder James, was born in Cul- 
pepper County, Va. March 8th, 1804, 
and died in Missouri, April 6, 1881. He 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



97 



was a devoted christian and zealous 
defender of what he conscientiously 
believed to be true and right. He united 
with the Baptist Church in Vir- 
ginia while young, and at the early age 
of nineteen years was called of the 




JAMES DUVAL 

Lord to the responsible and honored 
position of minister of the gospel, 
which calling he pursued with great 
diligence until his death. He was clerk 
of Fishing River Association, a faithful 
pastor, and a man of wholesome in- 
fluence. 



W. R. DYER. 

Dyer, Elder W. R., of Arenzville, 111., 
for more than thirty years has served 
Indiana Creek Church which was con- 



stituted about 1828. In early manhood 
he received a hope in Christ and was 
baptized by Elder G. W. Murphy in 
1871; ordained 1874 by Elder G. W. 
Murphy, John H. Myers John H. Tay- 
lor and Brice Allsberry. Elder Dyer is 
firm in the doctrine held dear by Bap- 
tists, and has ever been an earnest 
defender of the faith once delivered un- 
to the saints. The editor regrets that 
a fuller sketch of his life and labors 
could not be secured in place of this 
brief notice. 




C. H. DYKES. 

Dykes, Elder C. H., of Tracy City, 
Tenn., was born August 24, 1842; uni- 
ted with the Primitive Baptist Church, 
November, 1867, and was ordained to 
the gospel ministry, July 1891. Elder 
Dykes is an humble, faithful servant 
and before his ordination served his 
church as clerk and deacon for about 
thirty years. He is a member of the 
Collins River Association. 



W. 



EATON. 



Eaton, Elder W. T., of Cheney, Wash, 
was born in Rockingham County, Va., 
March 4, 1864; married to Miss Laura 
B. Hensley, December, 1885, and both 
united with Naked Creek Church, 
Rockingham County, and baptized by 
Elder Benjamin Lampton. Elder Eat- 
on's gift was soon discovered by his 
brethren and he soon began to speak 



publicly in the name of Jesus; was 
licensed in 1892, and in June the follow- 
ing year ordained by Elders T. S. 
Dalton and J. A. Norton. He was soon 
called to the care of churches and 
after serving from one to four churches 
for about six years he resigned his 
charge, moved to the state of Wash- 
ington where he remained one year; 
returned to Virginia and had the care 
of churches for about four years when 
he again moved to Washington and 



98 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



has since preached in school 
houses, private houses or where 
ever a door was opened for the procla- 
mation of the Word. In 1906, he was in 
the organization of a church in the 
city of Spokane and has since served 




W. T. BATON 

as its pastor. Elder Eaton is well es- 
tablished in the doctrine and practice 
of the Apostolic church as maintained 
by the Primitive Baptists and ably con- 
tends for the old paths wherein is peace 
for God's people and glory to His son. 



JONATHAN EDGERTON. 

Edgerton, Elder Jonathan (1835-1897) 
This earnest and decisive man was 
born in Wayne County, N. C, of Quaker 
parentage, and of that persuasion, 
holding the conditional system of sal- 
vation for years. He was baptized 
October, 1874 by Elder P. D. Gold, who 
also assisted in his ordination to the 
gospel ministry in 1877. He was for 
years the useful moderator of the 
Black Creek Association. In early life 
he was a Mason of note. His princi- 
ples and convictions were such that 
whatever his hand found to do he did 
it with his might. Hence he was an 
efficient and earnest Mason. Being a 
man of clear and quick mind, of deep 
intuition, and of clear, honest convic- 
tions, he was of decisive character, but 
also prudent. He held no half-way 
convictions, but Avas disposed to probe 
deep into a subject, and ascertain the 
truth. He was also fearless, manly and 
vigorous in defending or following his 
convictions. He was an ardent cour- 
ageous friend of the right, and a great 
lover of gospel peace, and of that good 



behaviour that leads to it. Men that 
love the right and perform it are not 
troublers in Israel, nor disturbers of 
the peace. One that knew Brother 
Edgerton doubted not where to find 
him, nor feared that he would turn his 
back on the foe in the day of battle. 
In all the relations of life he was gentle, 
kind and faithful. How kind as a hus- 
band, tender as a father, cheerful and 
faithful as a brother, obliging and use- 
ful as a neighbor, and citizen, solici- 
tous and laboring as a pastor. His gift 
in all the scriptures as a teacher and 
expounder was rich and precious, and 
few men were deeper and richer in 
tracing out and setting forth the spirit- 
ual meaning of the types and symbols 
under the law, and showing their glory 
in the gospel. What is wrapped up to 
most minds under the curtains of the 
tabernacle of the wilderness, was so 
revealed to him in the vail rent and 
open that he wondrously brought out 
things new and old, and showed them 
on the housetop in the noon day light 
of the gospel. He also exhorted the 
brethren to good living and peace. No 
stain was found on his garments. 
Beautiful were his feet, and bright the 
armor he wore to the end of his faithful 
life. 



EDMUND EDWARDS. 

Edwards, Elder Edmund, of North 
Carolina, was born in Edgecombe 
County, N, C, October 20, 1816; join- 
ed the church at Autrey's Creek, June 
1853, was licensed 1856, and ordained 
1857. He had the care of four 
churches, and was one of the most 
remarkable ministers raised up to 
that calling. He was illiterate and 
made use of broken language, but was 
one of the most spiritual men; his 
preaching reached the hearts of) his 
hearers, brought tears to their eyes, 
comfort to their hearts, and convinc- 
ed them of the mighty power of God 
dwelling in him. His ministry was 
short and precious to the saints. 



SIMEON EDWARDS. 

Edwards, Elder Simeon, died near 
Rock M511s, Randolph County, 
Ala., August 7, 1893. He was near 
eighty years old, and had been an 
able, sound and orderly gospel minis- 
ter for more than fifty years. For the 
last thirty years of his life he was 
greatly afflicted. In preaching, his ar- 
guments were predicated upon the 
Scriptures, and in calm, clear and 
forcible reasoning, he had but few 
if any, equals. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



99 




G. E. EDWARDS. 

Edwards, Eider G. E., of Macon, 
Mo., was born July 4, 1856, raised by 
■"Missionary" Baptist parents; convict- 
ed of sin 1880, and made to feel bis 
lost and ruined condition by nature 
and what he must be by grace to see 
God in peace; given a sweet hope in 
Jesus and united with Little Zion 
Church, Macon County, Mo., where 
his membership still remains. He was 
ordained to the ministry 1889, and 
has been serving churches since. For 
fourteen years he has been the faith- 
ful pastor of his home church and is 
much beloved by his brethren. 



WALTER C. EDWARDS. 

Edwards, Elder Walter C, of Mon- 
roe, N. C, was born in Union County, 
N. C, July 1, 1878; had serious 
thoughts of life and death when a 
mere lad. August 27, 1899, he was 
given a hope through grace in Christ 
and joined the church at Lawyer's 
Spring. Anson County, N. C, June, 
1900, and began to speak in public 
the following August, and was or- 
dained to the full work cf the minis- 
try March, 1903. Elder Edwards is a 
bold and able defender of the doctrine 
held by the Primitive Baptists and is 
an industrious farmer and labors for 
hlis own living. He is of a reserved 
disposition, but firm in what he deems 

right. 

S. A. ELKINS. 

Elkins, Elder S. A , of Montgomery 
City, Mo. This zealous and faithful 
servant of God was born in Clark 
County, Ky., November 27, 1843; 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Log Lick — near where ho 



was raised — in 1865; was ordained 
to the work of the ministry in 1872; 
has since served four churches as pas- 
tor most of the time; moved from 
Kentucky to Missouri in 1881; located 
in the bounds of the Cuivre Siloam 
Association and has served as Mod- 




S. A. ELKINS 

erator of this association continuously 
since 1890. Elder Elkins has ever 
stood opposed to the introduction of 
any new and unscriptural things into 
the worship of the Primitive church 
feeling satisfied with the old paths 
wherein is the good way. 




FRED ELMORE. 

Elmore, Elder Fred, of Grinnell, 
Iowa, united with Liberty Church, 



100 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Jasper County, Iowa, on the third 
Sunday in January, 1S80. In October, 
1884, he was ordained to the minis- 
terial work and has since served 
churches and preached wherever 
providence has cast his lot. He is the 
beloved Moderator of Mt. Pleasant 
Association of Primitive Baptists and 
is zealous in the cause of truth. 



J. G EUBANKS. 

Eubanks, Elder J. G. This able gift 
to the church is the faithful pastor of 
the old AVelsh Track church and oth- 
er Old School Baptist Churches in this 
section. He is also the beloved Moder- 
ator of the Delaware Old School Bap- 
tist Association and is highly esteemed 
wherever known, and it is regretted 
that a more suitable notice of his useful 
life and labors could not, for lack of 
data, appear. 




C. M. EVANS. 

Evans, Eider C. M., of Lexington, 
McDowell County, W. Va., was born 
in Virginia, August 15, 1861; raised on 
farm with poor opportunities for an 
education; married to Miss Elizabeth 
Puckett, January, 1S85. had serious 
thoughts of life and death, hell and 
heaven from his earliest recollections 
until the year 1888, felt that religion 
was only a matter of reformation and 
easy to get when he really wanted it. 
but in February, 1888, he was deeply 
convicted of sin and viewed himself as 
condemned and lost. So troubled was 
he that even his parents thought he 
was losing his mind and advised his 
wife to look close after him. But out of 



this morning., despairing, hopeless 
state God raised him, placed bis feet 
on a rock, even Christ; and put a song 
of praise and thanksgiving in his 
mouth. He had a natural desire to 
unite with the Campbellite church near 
him but was, he felt, killed to this 
desire and given a love for the Primi- 
tive Baptists whom he had heard of. 
So he left home and traveled many 
miles in search of them, was directed 
to Elder David Davis of Virginia, went 
to his home, then to his church, was 
received and baptized by him. Before 
his deliverance he had a desire to 
preach and in his prayers for mercy, 
promised that if God would deliver him 
from the fear of death and damnation 
he would be obedient. After his bap- 
tism he was again impressed with the 
duty of preaching and reminded of his 
promises. But Jonah-like he was dis- 
obedient and suffered much, but was 
taught by dreams scripture and ex- 
perience his duty so plain that he was 
encouraged to go forward in this public 
duty though he was uneducated and 
deeply felt his weakness. He was 
licensed in 1888 and in May, 1889, was 
ordained by Elders David Davis, Wal- 
lace Compton and S. H. Anville. Elder 
Evans has since had the care of 
churches and is at present Moderator 
of the Elk Horn Association 




W. T. EVERETT. 

Everett, Elder W. T., of Dawson, 
Ga , was born October 11, 1844, ot 
Primitive Baptist parents though in 
youth he loved not, nor cared for 
things pertaining to religion. His 
father, James Everett, was a faithful 
preacher of the Old School order. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



101 



Elder Everett served through the 
Civil war as a member of Co. E, 31st 
Ga. Volunteers, was wounded once 
and twice in prison. He was in 1S70 
convicted of sin, and in the following 
year given a sweet hope in Jesus, li- 
censed to preach 1875, and ordained 
in 1876. Most of the time since his 
ordination he has served four 
churches and has proved faithful to 
the cause of truth. Content with the 
Bible doctrine and practice he con- 
tends for the good old way and wants 
no new thing in the house of God. 



JAMES EVERETT. 

Everett James (1821-1887), was 
born in Twiggs County, Ga. He was 
reared in Houston County, and then 
moved to Macon County, where he was 
brought under conviction for sin and 
received a hope in Christ in early 



manhood, and was received into the 
fellowship of Hepzibah Church, ana 
was baptized by Elder Sampson Eng- 
lish. In June, 1843, he was marriea 
to Miss Sarah H. English, daughter 
of Elder Sampson English. In 1843 he 
moved to Stewart County, Ga. The 
church at Harmony, in 1844, licensed 
him to preach. He was soon called to 
serve a church, and his ordination 
called for, but he objected himself, 
and asked the church to let him serve 
as a licensed minister, which was 
granted. But in 1819 his ordination 
was called for again, and yet he ob- 
jected, but subsequently moved to 
Randolph County and put his letter 
in at Poplar Spring Church. His ordi- 
nation was once more called for and 
submitting to the wishes of his breth- 
ren a presbytery was called and he 
was ordained to the full gospel work. 
He was a faithful, humble, sincere, 
unassuming, self-denying and highly 
esteemed minister of the gospel. 



R. W. FAIN. 

Fain, Elder R. W. (M. D.), of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., was born December 8, 
1807; died February 2,1870. Dr. Fain 
was a close friend and fel- 
low-laborer of the late Elder 
John M. Watson and revised 
and greatly enlarged the second edi- 
tion cf Dr. Watson's book entitled 
"Old Baptist Test." He was a gifted 
preacher, able writer skillful physician 
and highly esteemed by his brethren as 
a minister and by his contemporaries 
in the medical profession. 



J, W. FAIRCHILD. 



Fairchild, Elder J. W., of Urbanette. 
Ark., was born in Russell County Va., 
February 24, 1871. When but an in- 
fant, his parents moved to Letcher 
County, Ky., where his mother still 
lives, his father having fallen asleep 
December 9, 1904. Elder Fairchild was 
given a good hope through grace in 
the seventeenth year of his age; was 
baptized by Elder S. C. Caudill, and 
received into the fellowship of Sand- 
lick Church in Letcher County, Ky. 
In his eighteenth year he began 
preaching Jesus, the sinner's Saviour, 
and was ordained to the work of the 
ministry May 21, 1892. On August 26', 



1894, he was married to Miss Lida 
Christian, of Rowan County, Ky. In 
July, 1896, he began the publication of 
the Footprints of The Flock, an Old 
School Baptist magazine, and still oc- 
cupies the editorial chair. He has 
lived in several different states, but 




J. W. FAIRCHILD 

his present home is near Green For- 
est, Ark. Elder Fairchild is an able 
speaker and fluent writer; is a lover 
and laborer for peace and fellowship 
among his Father's children who have 
been redeemed by the blood of Jesus, 



102 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



regenerated by the Holy Spirit and 
killed to the love of sin. He would say 
to them: "Wherefore laying aside all 
malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, 
and envies, and all evil speakings, as,, 
newborn babies, desire the sincere 
milk of the word, that ye may grow 
thereby; if so be ye have tasted that 
the Lord is gracious." — (1 Pet. 2:1-3). 




H. M. FARLEY. 

Farley, Elder H. M., of Pineville, W. 
Va., was born January 31, 1868. Early 
in life he attended Sunday schools and 
grew up feeling that salvation de- 
pended upon conditions for him to 
perform. When about seventeen years 
old he was deeply convicted of sin 
and made to cry unto God for mercy, 
was given a sweet hope in Jesus, and 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church, April, 1SS5. He was soon after- 
ward impressed with the duty of 
preaching, was ordained, and has been 
in the service of several churches since. 
He is Moderator of the Elk Horn Asso- 
ciation, and is much beloved by his 
people. A man of sterling worth, a 
good citizen, kind neighbor and useful 
in the cause of truth. 



J. F. FARMER. 

Farmer, Elder J. F., of Wilson,, N. C, 
son of Moses and Patience Farmer, 
was born in Wilson County, October 24, 
1854. His father died when he was 
about eleven years of age. His mother 
is still living and strong in the faith of 
salvation alone by the grace of God. 
His parents and grandparents were all 



primitive Baptists, and as far back as 
he can remember he has never hated 
the Primitive Baptists. While a boy, 
he experienced in a very satisfying 
way, a love for the cause of truth and 
for the people of God, and in this con- 
nection these scriptures frequently 
occurred to him in a very sweetly and 
comforting way: "We know we have 
passed from death unto life because 
we love the brethren." "My Beloved 
spake and said unto me, rise up my 
love, my fair one and come away." 
"He brought me to the banqueting 
house and His banner over me was 
love." Also the 208th hymn, Lloyd's 
Collection, "Love is the golden chain 
that binds, the happy souls above, 
and he is an heir of heaven that finds 
His bosom glow with love," was of 
especial interest to him. He felt the 
love of God shed abroad in his heart by 
the Holy Ghost, which was given unto 
him and with it came the blessed and 
glorious assurance that "nothing shall 
be able to separate us from the love of 
God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord." 
At about the age of nineteen he was 
received into the fellowship of the 
church at Wilson, N. C, and baptized 




J. F FARMER 

by his uncle, Elder William Wbodard 
and was blessed to go on his way 
rejoicing in hope of the glory of God. 
"Soon after this," he writes, " I was 
strongly impressed with a desire to do 
something to 'shew forth the praises of 
Him' who had called me 'out of dark- 
ness into His marvelous light.' I began 
to exercise but could not steadfastly 
continue. My doubts and fears and 
feelings of unfitness and unworthiness 
were such an obsetcle that I would quit 
a while. And then in that condition 
I was not satisfied and would try again, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



103 



only to fall by the way. However I 
was ordained by a presbytery composed 
of Elders P. D. Gold and William Wbod- 
ard, other ministers also being pres- 
ent." He has had the care of several 
churches and has baptized a good many 
but it seems specially to have fallen 
to his lot to marry couples, and at- 
tend funerals, and probably only a few 
ministers have married more people 
and attended more funerals for the 
same length of time. Amid the trials 
and temptations of life he feels to say 
with the apostle, "out of them all the 
Lord delivered me," and "by the grace 
of God I am what I am." Elder Farmer 
is fond of singing, and the following 
verses especially appeals to his feel- 
ings: 
"Through many dangers, toils and 

snares, 
I have already come, 
'Tis grace has brought me safe thus far, 
And grace will lead me home." 
"Thus far the Lord has led me on 

Thus far His power prolongs my days, 
And every evening shall make known, 
Some fresh memorial of His grace." 
His favorite scripture is: "Behold how 
good and how pleasant it is for breth- 
ren to dwell together in unity." 



DAVID FAWLEY. 

Fawley, Elder David, was born in 
Rockingham County, Va., August 9, 
1824, and died at his country home in 
Kosciusko County, Ind., March 28, 
1904. At the early age ofi fourteen 
years he became concerned about the 
condition of his soul before God, and 
fourteen years later found peace in 
the wounded side of our dear Redeem- 
er. In 1852 he was baptized by Elder 
A. A. Cole, and united with Union 
Church, Miami County, Ind. Soon af- 
ter this New Hope Church was con- 
stituted near the place of his death, 
and he became one of the constituent 
members. And a little over eight years 
ago he had his membership transfer- 
red to Pilgrim's Rest Church. He was 
in the constitution of this church also, 
and suggested its name. A sweet place 
it was for him to rest the last years 
of his life! He began preaching in 
1857, and was ordained in May, I860. 
His ministry was a most useful one 
to the scattered people of God in 
northern Indiana. He was not a doc- 
trinal preacher, but was thoroughly 
established in the doctrine of our dear 
people. He was mighty in prayer and 
exhortation., and a sweet preacher, a 
successful farmer, good citizen, and 
kind neighbor. 



WM. FERGUSON. 

Ferguson, Elder Wm., lived in Ma- 
rion County, Tenn., and was a mem- 
ber of Sweeten's Cove Church. Later 
he moved to Franklin County, Tenn , 
and served churches there. A full re- 
port could not be obtained of his lab- 
ors. He died about 1880. 



JOHN M. FIELD. 

Field, Elder John M. (1809-1891), 
was born in Kentucky, moved to Ma- 
con, Ga., in 1830, and lived there un- 
til some years ago, when he moved 
to Florida. He was an humble, devot- 
ed follower of our blessed Lord, and 
from the standpoint of his convictions 
he never swerved, either as teacher, 
or in the private relations of life; 
he was a faithful witness of God. He 
talked during his illness of nothing 
but the comforting doctrines of grace 
and magnified the goodness of God, 
who had provided for him a perfect 
Saviour and spoke of his approaching 
death as casually and coolly as 
though he was about to take a pieas- 
ant journey. He fought a good fight,, 
kept the faith and had the assurance 
that for him there was a mansion and 
crown awaiting him, the free gift of 
Him who had bought him with His 
own precious blood. He met death 
without fear or doubt, and spent his 
last days in praising God for his 
blessings and mercies, and in exhort- 
ing all to seek the Lamb of God. 



ELANTHAN FINCH. 

Finch, Elder Elanthan (1761-1845), 
of New York state, was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war and for many 
years a minister of the Old Fashion 
Baptists, and during the trying ordeal 
of 1832 when the division in the Bap- 
tist denomination occurred he re- 
mained firm and unshaken in the 
Apostle's doctrine and practice. 



W. A. FISH. 

Fish, Elder W. A., of Benton, Ills., 
was born near Sisterville, Va., (now 
W. Va.), June 12, 1855, convicted of 
sin and given a hope in Jesus as his 
sin-bearer, and united with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church in Benton, Ills., 
February 5, 1879, and was baptized by 



104 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Elder Josiah Harris. His gift was dis- 
covered by the church, and he was, in 
August, 1893, licensed to preach and 
in October, 1900, ordained to the full 
functions of the gospel ministry. Eld- 




W. A. FISH 

er Fish has the care of three 
churches, has been Moderator of the 
Bethel Association of Southern Illi- 
nois for several years and is an able, 
faithful gift and highly esteemed for 
the truth's sake. 




J. H. FISHER. 



serious thoughts about death and the 
future, and when about the age of 
fifteen realized a sweet joy in hear- 
ing the words, "Trust in the Lord," 
spoken in his heart and mind, though 
seemingly in his hearing. At the time 
he could not call it a hope but found 
comfort in it later. When about nine- 
teen years of age he united with the 
Missionary or New School Baptists, 
attended one of their seminaries and 
began preaching for them. But after 
a few years he left them and united 
with the Primitive or Old School 
Baptists in Kentucky, and wrote a 
very interesting book entitled, "My 
Reasons for Leaving the Missionary 
Baptists." Elder Fisher has published 
twelve thousand copies of this book. 
Has also published two thousand 
copies of "David's Sling" — a pam- 
phlet written by him exposing a Camp- 
bellism; and a brief History of the 
Baptist recently gotten out. He was 
founder of the Primitive Baptist Re- 
view and after some years of publica- 
tion discontinued it or changed the 
name to Banner of Peace. This paper 
was recently sold to Elder J. B. Hardy 
who combined it with the Advocate of 
Truth. After leaving the Missionary 
Bastists and joining the Primitive 
Church, he was, in 1893 ordained, 
and has since had the care of 
churches and has traveled and preach- 
ed in fifteen states. His home church, 
— Mtt. Zion — near Graham, Texas, 
which he has been serving about ten 
years is a strong church — has a well 
furnished, commodious stone meeting 
house and two hundred and twenty 
acres of farm land and parsonage. 
From this church Elder Fisher has 
constituted three other churches. 
Elder Fisher is a good writer and in- 
teresting speaker, loves the cause of 
Christ and labors for peace among the 
churches. 



W. L. FLEENER. 

Fleener, Elder W. L., of Tennyson, 
Ind., is moderator of the Little Zion 
Association of Regular Old School 
Baptists of Indiana and has the care of 
Tennyson and other churches in this 
Association. The editor regrets that 
a more extended notice could not -ap- 
pear. 



T. B. FISHER. 



Fisher, Elder T. B., of Richmond, 
Fisher, Elder J. H., of Graham, Mo., was born in Ray County, Mo., No- 
Texas, was born in Texas, December vember 30, 1852, and joined Fishing 
22, 1860. From early childhood he had I River Church in October. 1882. He was 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



105 



ordained in May, 1895. He has a quiet 
and humble spirit, desiring to serve his 
brethren and is the pastor of two 
churches. This brief notice is found 




T. B. FISHER 



in Elder Cash's book published in 1896 
and the editor regrets that further in- 
formation could not be obtained. 



G. W. FLOYD. 

Floyd, Elder G. W., of Empire, Ga. 

This faithful brother is the beloved 
moderator of tie Primitive Ebenezer 
Association. He has the care of Union 
and Pleasant Plains churches and is 
highly esteemed among his people. 



WM. H. FLY. 

Fly, Elder Wm. H., of Xash County. 
N. C, was born October, 1848 and died 
January, 1906. He was received into 
the fellowship of Pleasant Hill Church 
and baptized by Elder John Scott, 1875. 
He was ordained a deacon in said 
church 1890, and in 1897 was ordained 
to the ministry by Elders W. B. Strick- 
land and Dorris Armstrong. He served 
Upper Town Creek, Mill Branch and 
Salem churches and was a gifted 
preacher and beloved by his people. 



CHARLES FORSEE. 

Forsee, Elder Charles (1754-1837). 
This venerable and faithful servant of 
God was born in Powhatan County, Va., 



received a hope in Christ, 1776, and in 
1785 began to improve a public gift. 
He was ordained to the work of the 
gospel ministry, and settled as pastor 
of the Skinquarter Church in 1799, and 
with this church he continued to labor 
until December, 1834, when on account 
of the common infirmity of old age, he 
resigned his pastoral charge and 
waited to welcome the messenger of 
his departure from this imperfect state 
of being, unto that immortal and in- 
corruptible state which God has pre- 
pared for all those who love his ap- 
pearing. The unbounded confidence 
which this aged father manifested in 
the God of his salvation, was truly as- 
tonishing; especially when about leav- 
ing this world. Of him it may be said 
in truth, "He has fought the good fight 
— has finished his course, and kept the 
faith." The invariable theme of his 
preaching was Jesus Christ and Him 
crucified; and in the exhibition of this, 
no subject was so familiar and sweet 
as that of the sovereign discriminating, 
immutable, invincible and eternal grace 
of God, set forth in the eternal salva- 
tion of all the vessels of His 
mercy. At the first entrance 
among the Baptists of the sys- 
tem of modern benevolence, so call- 
ed, Elder Forsee lifted up his voice , 
like a trumpet; nor did he cease to 
warn his brethren solemnly, and with 
tears, against uniting with any relig- 
ious society except the Church of 
Christ, and even unto his death he 
protested against all the God-dishon- 
oring doctrines and institutions which 
have at this day obtained among a 
majority of the professors of Christ- 
ianity. 



S. R. FOSTER. 

Foster, Elder S. R., of Rural Hill, 
Ills. The following brief notice is 
from Elder Potter's book published in 
1895 and is inserted as further in- 
formation could not be secured: "Eld- 
er Foster was born in Hamilton Coun- 
ty, Ills., on the 26th day of January, 
1828, and joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Little Spring in 1S50, and 
was ordained to the work of the min- 
istry in 1862. and is now pastor of two 
churches. Elder Foster has been a 
hard student and is very well inform- 
ed, and has always been faithful. 



T. J. FOSTER. 

Foster, Elder T. J. (1805-1899), was 
born in Jackson County, Ga., All the 
salvation that he hoped for was based 



106 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



upon the mercy and goodness of God 
towards him. He was impressed in 
early life with man's great responsi- 
bility to God, and as was natural 
strove very hard to induce God to 
save him by his Pharisaical duties. 
When all his efforts proved unvailing, 
it was revealed that the Lord Jesus 
Christ is the Alpha and Omega of the 
saved sinner's hope. He united with 
the church in 1828. Some years later 
he was liberated by the Missionary 
Church (the Baptists about that time 
having divided on the question of mis- 
sions and money) to preach, but as he 
and they could not agree, he left them 
and joined the Primitive Baptists and 
commenced preaching. He was or- 
dained to take charge of churches in 
1S40 by Elder Elias Brown and James 
Miller. In 1S49 he moved to Arkansas. 
He \\ as a zealous Primitive Baptist. 
In the language of one who knew 
him: "Without a fee or earthly re- 
ward he went from church to church 
over a large territory, and with the 
persistency of Paul and the fervency 
of Peter he proclaimed the everlasting 
gospel to dying sinners. He was 
known far and wide as 'Uncle 
Tommy Foster,' and was for twenty- 
five years Moderator of the Ouachita 
Primitive Baptist Association.' 



W. H. H. FRANCIS. 

Francis, Elder W. H. H. (1841-1907) 

of Indiana, was one of a family of 
twelve children. He received a hope 
in Christ and united with the Beulah 
Baptist Church, and was baptized by 
Elder Pritchard the first Sunday in 
October, 1SS5. In 1895 he was ordained 
to the work of the ministry. The above 
few lines relate the important events 
in the life of this good man, but all his 
goodness will never be told in this 
world. He lived his profession, bridled 
his tongue, and his religion was not in 
vain. If there ever was a man who 
made straight paths for his feet to walk 
in, he was that man, and he walked in 
the paths after they were made. His 
conversation was spiritual- and pure. 
He fought a good fight and finished his 
course with joy. 



A. B. FRANCIS. 

Francis, Elder A. B., of Delmar, Del., 
son of Robert H. and Susannah E. 
Francis was born in Fauquire County. 
Ta., May 14, 1842. When he was about 
six years old he was under conviction — 



not for some outward act of wickedness 
but as a voice within saying: "Thou 
art a sinner." He was made to feel 
condemned by God's holy law. For 
many years he labored and was heavy 
laden, trying to work himself in favor 
with God. In this he failed, but when 
his case was hopless he was blessed to 
find relief and rest in Jesus. This was 
in 1864. He wanted to tell to others 
what a precious Saviour he had found. 
Thus he was impressed to preach be- 
fore uniting with the church which he 
did at Upper Brood Run, the church of 
his mother's membership, in June, 1865. 
The following year he was licensed 
and in July, 1868, was ordained by Eld- 




A. B. FRANCIS 

ers Gilbert Beebee, William J. Puring- 
ton and Robert C. Leachman. Elder 
Francis has been in the ministry more 
than forty years and during that time 
has served the churches of Fryingpan 
and Quantico in Virginia, Kingswood 
in New Jersey, Tuscaro in Pennsylva- 
na, and now has care of four churches 
in the Salisbury Association and the 
London Tract Church in Pennsylvania. 
He was, in August, 1870, married to 
Miss Laura Page Middleton of Virginia. 
This union was blessed with six chil- 
dren. After her death in 1897, he was, 
in 1899, married to Miss Mary Frances 
Cole of Maryland. Elder Francis is 
Moderator of the Salisbury Old School 
Baptist Association, is a gifted and 
faithful minister and highly esteemed 
by his charges. 



LEWIS E. FRAZEE. 

Frazee, Elder Lewis E., of Bentley, 
Ills., was born in the state of Ohio in 
the year 1863, and united with the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



107 



Missionary Baptists. In 1884 he united 
with the Cherryvale Church in Kan- 
sas, and returning to Illinois became 
a member of Middle Creek Church 
where he was ordained in May, 1888, 
to the full work of the gospel minis- 
try. He has since had the care of 



fi^' 


« 
h 


E 


^^^••'■^i 






-'■'"-Bk 








flliBBBII 









LEWIS E. FRAZEE. 

churches, is an able, humble minister, 
and highly esteemed among his peo- 
ple, and the editor regrets that his 
efforts to obtain recent data from 
which to prepare a more extended 
sketch proved in vain. 



JAMES FREY. 

Frey, Elder James, of Pennsylvania, 
who fell asleep in Jesus in 1841, was 
an able minister of the New Testa- 
ment. He was the regular pastor ol 
the Baptist Church at Big Redstone, 
upwards of thirty years, faithful and 
beloved. He was a faithful husband; 
an affectionate father; and an agree- 
able neighbor. He served the church 
with indefatigable industry; he ever 
was careful to adhere strictly to the 
instruction afforded him in the Scrip- 
tures, and gloried in maintaining and 
publishing the truth as it is in Christ 
Jesus, and also in maintaining good 
works. 

JOHN E. FROST. 

Frost, Elder John E., (1825-1904), 
was nearly 79 years old when he died, 
and had been a minister of the Primi 
tive Baptist Church for more than 



fifty years; was married to Alice D. 
Hix, 1846, with whom he lived for 
fifty-three years. No one knew him 
but to love him. He traveled almost 
all the time for nearly twenty-five 
years, and preached the gospel; and 
just a few days before he died he 
said, "In life I preached salvation by 
the grace of God, and now in death 
the grace of God is my only hope." 
He was a gifted preacher, good citizen 
and kind neighbor and such a life is 
worth more than all the world's 
riches. - — 

RICHARD FULKERSON. 

Fulkerson, Elder Richard, of Illinois, 
From Elder Potter's Sketch-book 
published in 1895, it is learned that 
Elder Fulkerson was born in Pope 
County 111., on the lSth day of October, 
1819; united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist church in 1844 and was ordained to 
the work of the ministry in 1848, and 
was at that time serving three churches 
though in the seventy-seventh year of 
his age. Later information could not 
be obtained by the editor. 



T. J. FULLER. 

Fuller, Elder T. J., of West Salem, 
111., Efforts by the editor to obtain 
data from which to prepare a suitable 
sketch of Elder Fuller proved fruitless 
and all the information obtainable is 
that he was born in Wabash County, 
111., July 12, 1847, joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church in November, 1882, and 
w r as ordained to the ministry in May, 
1891. 




C. L. FUNK. 

Funk, Elder C. L., of Needmore, Pa., 
was born March 29, 1844, and in his 



108 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



twenty-second year of age was married 
to Miss Annie Covalt. Two years later, 
September, 1868, he united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church, and some 
years after this was ordained to the 
gospel work and now has the care of 
five churches. In a letter to the editor 
Elder Punk writes: "The Lord has 
been good to me, led me in a way I 
knew not and gave me a strong impres- 
sion to preach his everlasting gospel. 
But this I resisted until after a severe 
spell of fever, much affliction, and 
burden of mind, I was made willing, 
and for thirtv years through poverty 
and affliction I have been trying to 
preach and the Lord has thus far sus- 
tained me." Elder Funk is an humble 
minister and loves the cause of truth 
dearly. 



J. J. FUQUA. 

Fuqua, Elder J. J., of Bold Spring, 
Tenn. This worthy minister who now 
lacks one "mile stone" of reaching 
four score years, was born in Hick- 
man County, Tenn., in 1830; united 
with the Primitive Baptist Church in 
1S56, and was ordained in 1868. Elder 
Fuqua says he has been living on the 
doctrine of grace for fifty-three years; 



has been trying to preach it forty-one 
years, and by the grace of God is 
willing to die contending for the same 
grand principles advocated by Christ 
and His apostles. Though almost 
worn out in the service of his Master 




J. J. FUQUA 

yet he has lost none of his interest 
in the cause of truth, and desires to 
see the young ministry contending 
earnestly for the faith once delivered 
unto the saints 




W. R. GALLIMORE. 

Gallimore, Elder W. R., of Lexing- 
ton, N. C. This brother of good re- 
port, who has been preaching about 



four years, was born June 12, 1853, 
The editor regrets that a sketch of 
his life and labors could not be ob- 
tained. 



HODGES GALLOP. 

Gallop, Elder Hodges, son of 
Willis Gallop, was born January 22, 
1807, lived all his life in Carrituck 
County, N. C, and died there February 
20, 1877 in the seventieth year of his 
age. His father was one of the 
wealthiest men in the county, but 
manifested no interest in religion nor 
made any effort to bring up his son in 
a right and proper manner. Thus the 
subject of our sketch was reared amid 
a sordid, selfish influence and in love 
with sin. But God began a work in his 
heart, and so killed him to the love of 
sin, that even as a boy, he refused to 
obey his father's orders to enter into 
the dance and revelry. He was a 
staunch friend to the Baptists in the 
heated and excited division in Rowels 
Point church now called Elem, in 1833, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



109 



when the Fullerite element in vain 
undertook to expell the Old Party 
though at that time he was not a 
member. He united with this church 
in 1838 and it is said bought out the 
contentious element himself in order 
to have no further trouble Avith them. 
In 1845 he was ordained as deacon and, 
licensed to preach in 1850 and ordained 
to the ministry in 1853 by Elders 
Samuel Tatum and Caleb T. Sawyer. 
Elder Gallop was not considered an 
able expounder of the scripture but was 
a good, sound practical preacher, and 
perhaps came as near living the truth 
he preached as any. He was one of 
natures' noblemen, a man of good 
judgment, kind disposition and very 
charitable to the poor. Before he died 
he made preparations for his departure 
and on his death bed selected two 
hymns to be used at his funeral. 



STEPHEN GUARD. 

Guard Elder Stephen (1776-1839), 
was an able minister of the gospel, 
was baptized by Elder William Van- 
church at Morristown, N. J. In 1803, he 
Home, in 1801 and united with the 
was licensed and set apart to the work 
of the ministry by Carpenter's Run 
Church in this state, Elders James 
Lee and Moses Frezee officiating. Eld- 
er Guard was a man of uncommonly 
strong mind, bright intellect, and gen- 
erally decided and unmoveable in his 
plans and purposes. He was well qual- 
ified to fill almost any station, either 
in church, society or government, that 
his friends could have desired to place 
him in, had he been so disposed; but 
so it was with him, he desired no 
greater honor than to be filling his 
place in the house of God; and noth- 
ing else seemed so near, and dear to 
him, as the peace and happiness of his 
brethren., and the health and prosper- 
ity of the dear Redeemer's kingdom. 
He was, for many years, Moderator 
of Miami Association, and highly es- 
teemed as a minister of Jesus. 



STEPHEN I. GARDNER. 

Gardner, Elder Stephen I., of Cozad, 
Neb., was born May 1, 1861 in Rich- 
land County, 111. Married to Miss 
Phoebe J. Arnold, 1884. Received a 
hope in the year of 1886 joined Little 
Zion Church, 1888, and ordained in 
May, 1893. Since that time he has 
had the care of from two to four 
churches, has baptized more than one 
hundred members, held four debates 
with other denominations, preached 



quite a number of funerals and united 
in marriage a large number of people. 
Elder Gardner, his wife and their three 
oldest children are members of Liberty 
Church near Alma, Marion County, 111. 
This is the strongest church in Little 
Wabash Association, and the Primitive 
Baptists are the leading denomination 
in that community. Elder Gardner is 




STEPHEN I. GARDENER 

sound in doctrine and orderly in prac- 
tice, is satisfied to be a plain old fash- 
ioned Baptist and is opposed to all new 
things that are being advocated among 
Baptists in some places. Recently 
Elder Gardner has moved to Cozad, 
Neb., where he and Elder Craig con- 
stituted Mt. Zion Church. 




A. J. GARLAND. 

Garland Elder A. J., of Front Royal, 
Va., was born in Fulton County, Pa., 
May 26, 1880; convicted of sin early 



110 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



in life and given a hope in the Sa- 
viour, but these exercises of a burden- 
ed heart for sin and the relief of that 
burden was so gradual in its nature 
tixat, like many others, he cannot 
date the exact time. When about six- 
teen years of age the preaching of the 
gospel by the Primitive or Old School 
Baptists became very precious to him 
and he went before Tonoloway 
Church, asked for a home, was receiv- 
ed and baptized by Elder T. N. Alder- 
ton. About two years later he was im- 
pressed with the dutv of preaching 
Jesus to others, but endeavored to 
rid his mind of such impressions, and 
to keep it to himself. The church dis- 
covered his gift and licensed him in 
1902 and the following year — on De- 
cember 19th — he was ordained to the 
full functions of the gospel ministry. 
Three days before this he was mar- 
ried to Miss Rosa Ashpaugh. Elder 
Garland moved to Front Royal in 
1904, where he has since resided and 
has now — 1908 — the care of six 
churches. 



JAMES GARNETT. 

Garnett, Elder James, the son of 
Captain Anthony Garnett, was born 
in Culpepper County, November 1743, 
baptized by Elder Elijah Craig and 
was soon ordained to the ministry. He 
was a minister of great influence. In 
point of morality and correct chris- 
tian deportment, few have surpassed 
him, and at home or abroad, in public 
or in private he was always the same. 
Religion was his constant theme, and 
for nearly fifty years he was an active 
laborer in his Master's vineyard. He 
died in 1830, two years before the great 
division in the Baptist Churches of 
Virginia, but in his ministry he did not 
advocate the many new departures that 
caused the division. 



ROBERT GARNETT. 

Garnett, Elder Robert (1770-1854) 
son of Elder James Garnett, was a 
Virginian by birth, though he lived in 
Kentucky many years, serving 
churches in Boone County, and bap- 
tizing serveral hundred persons in that 
section before returning to Virginia. 
He was convicted of sin and given a 
hope in Jesus in bis eighteenth year, 
united with Crooked Run Church, Cul- 
pepper County, Va., January 1789, and 
was baptized by his father. Elder Gar- 
nett served Mill Creek Church as 
pasto:- after the death of Elder John 



Koontz. Under the separation, 1832-35 
he identified himself with the Old 
Baptists, and never in anywise con- 
nected himself with the modern in- 
ventions of New Schoolism, but both 
publicly and privately expressed his 
devotion to the peculiarities of doctrine 
and practice which characterize the 
Old School Baptists. 



W. C. GARRETT. 

Garrett, Eider W. C. (1822-1894), of 
Missouri, was born in Kentucky, mov- 
ed to Missouri when quite young and 
settled in what is called the Piatt 
Purchase. When in his eighteenth 
year he became deeply concerned in 
regard to the salvation of his soul, 
his conviction was deep and pungent 
until he despaired of all hope. But in 
June, 1842, he was enabled to hope 
in God's mercy. His deliverance from 
the thraldom of sin and death was 
truly wonderful. Duty was at once 
impressed upon him to confess the 
Saviour and to be baptized in His 
precious name and also a burning de- 
sire in his heart to speak of God's 
goodness and mercy to the children 
of men. So according to his own ac- 
count, he at once, in company with 
his wife went before the church call- 
ed Bethlehem in DeKalb County, Mo., 
and gave a relation of their hope in 
Christ and were received and baptiz- 
ed by Elder Jchn M. Evans. He com- 
menced preaching very young. His 
license bears date June, 1842, and in 
March, 1845, he was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry. In his 
young days he was very active and 
energetic in the ministry, was a stout 
man physically and possessed a won- 
derful mind, intellectually. He states 
in bis memoires that at the end of 
thirty years of his ministry he had 
traveled thirty thousand miles. His 
labors were principally confined to 
Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska. 



JOHN GILBERT. 

Gilbert, Elder John, of Kentucky 
was born on the sea coast in North 
Carolina about the year 1857. His 
grandmother was from Scotland and 
grandfather from England. He served 
in the latter part of the War 
of the Revolution. Soon after he 
came to Kentucky and located near 
where Frankfort now is when there 
was but one house there. Afterwards 
he located in what is now Clay County, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



111 



spending a great deal of his time 
hunting as that was the most profitable 
business then. He said he killed over 
one thousand bear in his life making 
his bacon out of bear meat instead of 
hogs. He was brought to receive a 
hope in Christ early in life and soon 
after he joined the Baptist Church of 
Christ and began preaching the gospel, 
traveling all over the mountains of 
Eastern Kentucky on horseback, 
preaching to those people till he was 
over one hundred years old. He died 
March 11, 1868, making him about one 
hundred and eleven years old at time 
of his death. He was the grandfather 
of Elder J. J. Gilbert and a most re- 
markable man and zealous pioneer 
preacher. 



RICHARD M. GILBERT. 

Gilbert, Elder Richard M., of Jef- 
ferson County, Fla., was born in Mor- 
gan County, Ga., 1825, and died Oc- 
tober 10, 1900. He was a noble man, 
his house was a home to the stranger, 
and his hand ever ready to help the 
poor and needy. The editor is unable 
to secure data covering his useful 
ministry. 




J. J. GILBERT. 

Gilbert, Elder J. J., of Winchester, 
Ky. This faithful and able brother 
was born in Owsley County, Ky., Jan- 
uary 13, 1S44, brought under convic- 
tion in early life and though a boy of 
good morals was made to feel that he 
was a great sinner, and was given a 
sweet hope in Jesus the 10th day of 
January, 1868. Of this he writes: "On 
that morning about 8 o'clock I was rid- 



ing along all alone meditating over 
my lost condition, when all at once it 
seemed that the whole of my life 
was laid open before me as one dark 
page of sin and transgression against 
God in which I could see no good 
thing I had ever done to merit His 
favor. While thinking over this terri- 
ble picture, in a moment the veil was 
lifted and Christ was presented to 
view as my Saviour, the chief among 
ten thousand and all together lovely. 
His praises poured forth from my 
heart while tears of joy freely ran 
down over my cheeks." He united 
with the Baptists at Station Camp 
Church, Estill County, Ky., April, 
1868. From the time he received a 
hope he was impressed with the work 
of the ministry over which he earn- 
estly prayed. He says: "On Monday 
evening after fourth Sunday in De- 
cember, 1S69, I made my first effort 
to preach from the text, " 'This is the 
work of God that you believe on Him 
whom He hath sent.' " In this effort I 
felt as perfect freedom as I ever had 
in my life. At this time I felt a 
strange feeling in my heart which 
lasted about ten days. While this was 
on I did not feel like eating or sleep- 
ing much and preaching was as 
easy as it was to open my mouth, and 
the Scriptures opened up to my mind 
so clear that I often found myself in 
tears." He was soon ordained to the 
gospel ministry, and has since had 
the care of churches, has never felt 
dissasisfied with the Old School Bap- 
tists or regretted uniting with them 
and wants no new thing in God's 
house; has traveled and preached in 
Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Virginia and 
Maryland and has been well received. 



TAYLOR J. GILBERT. 

Gilbert, Elder Taylor J., of Ken- 
tucky, was bom in Clay County, Ky., 
October 4, 1840, and was married to 
Mary Haggard, March 11, 1S12. Be- 
fore he knew anything about experi- 
mental religion he became a mem- 
ber of the Christian or more familiar- 
ly known as the Campbellite Church, 
while in Idaho, about the year 1869. 
Returning to Kentucky after receiv- 
ing the evidence of a pardon of his 
sins, through the atoning blood of 
Jesus Christ, and before heaiing the 
gospel preached, he became dissatis- 
fied with his connection with the 
Campbellite Church and joined the 
Free Will Baptists; but as soon as he 
heard the gospel as preached by the 
Primitive Baptists, he asked and re- 



112 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ceived baptism at the hands of Elder 
A. C. Newlands, of the Old Baptist 
Church, and from that time spent the 
remainder of his life preaching a 
finished salvation in Jesus. About this 
time, the Old Red Bird Association, 
•which had been built up by his grand- 
father, Elder John G. Gilbert, was re- 
vived by his work, and during his 
work in the ministry many churches 
were organized and many persons 
baptized into the fellowship of this 




twelve, El-Bethel eight, Mt. Enon two, 
Orange four years and has, dur- 
ing this time traveled upwards of one 
hundred and fifteen thousand miles, 
perhaps half of the distance in pri- 
vate conveyance. He has baptized 
nearly three hundred persons, helped 



TAYLOR J. GILBERT 

body. He was Moderator of said As- 
sociation until he moved to Oklahoma, 
in March, 1902. where he very sud- 
denly and unexpectedly died from 
paralysis of the heart. Few in modern 
times, have shown more zeal or de- 
votion to the work of their Heavenly 
Master than he or made greater sac- 
rifice for the cause of truth. It was 
said after his death by a minister 
well qualified to know: "That no man 
was ever more loved and respected 
by the members of his churches than 
Taylor J. Gilbert." 



M. L. GILBERT. 

Gilbert, E!der M. L., of Dade City, 
Fla., was born in Kentucky, Septem- 
ber 16, 1857. During his third year in 
college his health failed, and the doc- 
tors advised that he go to Florida, 
which he did in 1881; joined the Old 
School Baptists at Mt. Enon, Fla., 
May, 1886; ordained to the work of 
the ministry, March, 1889; was called 
to the care of churches soon after 
ward, and has served Empire and 
Antioch each for the last nineteen 
years; Bethel seventeen, Little Flock 




M. L. GILBERT 

to ordain several preachers, and four- 
teen deacons; married seventy-eight 
persons, and preached over two thou- 
sand sermons. Elder Gilbert has serv- 
ed on the editorial staff of the Prim- 
itive Baptist and the Banner of 
Peace and is a useful minister. 



A. J. GILBERT. 

Gilbert, Elder A. J., was born April 
3, 1810, and died April 15, 1893. He 
was an humble man and faithful sol- 
dier of the cross. He remained with 
the Missionaries awhile after the split 
but soon the Lord led him to his 
friends, the Primitive Baptists. Soon 
after he joined the church he was set 
apart to the work of the ministry, 
which office he filled faithfully to the 
end. He traveled and preached a great 
deal among the Baptists of his state, 
and was faithful to the end and 
greatly loved by his people. 



WILLIS E. GILL. 

Gill, Elder Willis E., of Cloverdale, 
Ind., was born .September 21, 1869, in 
Edgar County, Ills.; united with the 
Methodist Church at Harmcny near 
Kansas, Ills., in 1886, and was baptiz- 
ed by Rev. E. B. Randal. Becoming 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



113 



convinced that the. doctrine of salva- 
tion by grace as taught by the Prim- 
itive Baptists was the doctrine of the 
sinners and after many friendly tilts 
soinners and after many friendly tilts 
with the Metnodists on that subject, 
united with the Providence Primitive 
Baptist Church in Edgar County, 111., 
and was baptized by Elder M. B. Mof- 
fett of Paris, 111., in February, 1591. 
Was ordained to the work of the min- 
istry August 5, 1893, by the following 
elders: Jas M. True, C. W. Kemper, 
Wm. Luce, O. B. Gamron, M. B. Mof- 
fett, Thos G. Drake, A. H. Patton 
S. H. Moffett and F. M. Reeds. In 
July, 1893, he removed to Cloverdale, 
Ind., changing his membership to 




WILLIS E. GILL 

Smyrna Church near Cloverdale, 
which at that time had a member- 
ship of twelve but has now increased 
to about three times that number. He 
has the care of three churches near 
his home; was married to Miss Lily 
May Moffett of Kansas, March 4, 1891. 
of Elder S. H. Moffet, March 4, 1891. 
Two children have been born to them, 
Jessie and Carlyle, both of whom 
though young in years, have a deem- 
ed preference for the dear old church 
which their parents have tried to 
serve. The churches under his care 
are not bothered with any of the 
questionable practices which do harm 
to the precious cause of Christ. 



WILLIAM GILMORE. 

Gilmore, Elder William. This min- 
ister was an able gift to the church. 
He was a native of Maryland, moved 
to Virginia about the year 1800 and 
began preaching at the Ketocton 



Church in London County, where the 
Ketocton Association was formed in 
1766. He also served New Valley, 
North Fork and Upperville churches, 
in Virginia, and was a fatithful pastor 
going through heat and cold to meet 
his appointment. As a speaker Elder 
Gilmore was entertaining. He was 
firm and well grounded in doctrine 
and could not be moved by the great 
tidal wave of Arminianism that swept 
through the Association during the 
first quarter of the nineteenth centu- 
ry and culminated in a division in 
the Baptist church, 1828-1835. 



W. H. GILMORE. 

Gilmore, Elder W. H., of North 
Yakima, Wash., was born in Des- 
Moines County, Iowa, November 4, 
1848, but when four years old his pa- 
rents emigrated from that state to 
Oregon. He was taught good morals 
and to be obedient, but in 1873, when 
grown to manhood, there came to him 
another Teacher, an inward and di- 
vine one, who taught him that mor- 
ality and obedience were not all he 
needed. He was arrested as a way- 
ward and thoughtless transgressor 
against God's holy law, and made to 
regard himself as a poor, needy sin- 
ner. In this helpless condition, and 
stripped of all self-confidence, he was, 
given a hope in Jesus as a sin-bearing 
Saviour, and in June, 1876, united 
with the Baptists and was baptized 
by Elder J. A. Bullock . Soon after 
this he was impressed to preach the 
gospel as glad tidings to helpless sin- 
ners. Although he loved the gospel, 
he rebelled against this impression 
until March, 1891, when he made the 
attempt to speak in the Lord's match- 
less name. On May 9, 1896, he was or- 
dained to the full work of the minis- 
try, and has since been preaching 
among the churches as the Lord gave 
him liberty. Elder Gilmore is an hum- 
ble faithful minister, is a member of 
the Siloam Association and was at its 
last session— June, 1908 — < chosen 
Moderator. He is pastor of Pleasant 
Grove Church in Yakimo County, 
Wash., which holds three meetings 
each month and is zealous in the 
cause of truth. 



P. D. GOLD. 

Gold, Elder P. D., of Wilson, N. C. 
The subject of this sketch was the 
second son in a family of eleven chil- 
dren and was born in Rutherford, now 



114 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Cleveland County, N. C, March 25, 1833. 
His opportunities for an education were 
very limited, and not being satisfied 
with the meagre three months annual 
school session which the county af- 
forded, with a thirst for knowledge and 
an undaunted ambition, he succeeded 
after each hard day's work on his 
father's farm, in acquiring sufficient 




P. D. GOLD 

education, to enable him at the age of 
twenty, to pass an examination for 
teacher in the public schools of his 
county. About this time he began the 
study of law under A. W. Burton, Esq. 
obtained his license in 1856 and began 
the practice of his profession at Shelby. 
N. C. After about two years not find- 
ing the practice of law congenial to his 
taste and convictions, he abandoned 
that vocation and decided to enter the 
field of the gospel ministry. With little 
money and owing for previous educa- 
tion he entered Furman University, S. 
C, where he remained for two years, 
afterwards going to the Southern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary for a short 
term, being forced to discontinue his 
studies at the latter place through the 
opening of the Civil war. Notwith- 
standing the annoyance and anxiety he 
felt because of inadequate financial 
means during these years, he took a 
high stand in his classes at the institu- 
tions, although his debts, for which 
his creditors held his personal notes, 
had grown to the, to him, enormous 
sum of two thousand dollars, which was 
after the war worked out and paid by 
himself and wife. During the war he 
accepted the charge of a church in 
Goldsboro N. C, and while there met 
and was happily married to Miss Julia 
Pipkin in 1863. About 1865 a deep 
conviction seized this man, confronting 



him with a sinful nature and therefore 
a sinful life. The justice of God in his 
condemnation, showing him he sinned 
in Adam, and therefore death passed 
upon him in Adams' disobedience, so 
overwhelmed him in confusion that he 
despaired of mercy and felt he was lost. 
This wrought in him an abiding con- 
sciousness of the sinfulness of man. In 
this view he saw and felt the justice 
of God in his condemnation. In that 
dark hour the Lord Jesus, the Saviour 
of sinners, appeared as his righteous- 
ness, fully justifying him with the 
words, sounding out to him as if spok- 
en aloud : "If God give you Christ, how 
shall he not with him freely give you all 
things?" This caused a great change 
in his views and conduct. From that 
time he preached Christ Jesus as the 
only name under heaven given among 
men whereby we must be saved. The 
predestination of God appeared ap- 
pointing beforehand what he pur- 
posed should come to pass, and the 
electing love of God choosing before- 
hand, and without regard to man's 
works, the people he loved in Christ 
Jesus, and giving them grace in Him. 
He sought for a people who loved and 
believed that doctrine, discarding all 
free agency of man and rejecting all 
self appointed means and measures of 
man's devising. This people he found 
known as the Primitive Baptists, and 
was received among them and baptized 
by Elder C. B. Hassell, at old Kehuke 
Church, since which time he has been 
preaching among them, -desiring to 
know nothing among men but Jesus 
Christ and Him crucified. He considers 
that a man should be industrious, and 
labor to build his section and further 
useful enterprises. But the labor he 
would perform in preference to all 
other kinds is to establish the truth in 
Christ Jesus, in an humble walk and 
godly conversation. In 1871 he be- 
came editor of "Zion's Landmark," 
and for thirty-seven years it has been 
an important and influential paper 
among the Baptists. In the course of 
his editorial career Elder Gold has 
written a vast amount, but he has 
made only one publication outside his 
professional work. This was a small 
religious book, being a "Treatise On 
the Book of Joshua," which gives 
evidence of much thought, learning 
and power of analysis. Devoted to his 
calling, Elder Gold has not concerned 
himself to any great extent with sec- 
ular matters, but his sympathies are 
with the people to whom he ministers, 
and he shares in their hopes and as- 
pirations. From his earliest recollec- 
tion he always had a purpose to lead 
an active life and to be useful in his 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



115 



day and generation, and ■with resolu- 
tion he has pushed on in that path 
until he has attained a position reach- 
ed by but few in the respect and confi- 
dence of his fellow citizens; still he 
says that his life has not been what 
he would desire. He is at present 
pastor of Falls Church near Rocky 
Mt., and the churches at Tarboro, Wil- 
son and Durham, is Moderator of 
Black Creek Association and travels 
extensively among the Baptists, has 
served as trustee of the University of 
North Carolina, and other positions 

of trust. ■ 

HORACE GOLSTON. 

Golston, Elder Horace, was born 
in Marion County, Tenn., September 
13, 1881. He received a hope in Jesus 
when about twelve years old, but did 
not express it publicly until about the 
age of eighteen. He was immersed 
into the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church and lived with them three 
years. Becoming dissatisfied, he join- 
ed the Primitive Baptist Church at 
Cedar Springs, Marion County, Tenn., 
on Friday before the third Sunday :n 
August, 1902. Brother Golston was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry in 
July, 1905, by a presbytery consisting 
of Elders M. A. Hackworth, J. G. 
Woodfin, and R. O. Ralston. Since that 
time and up to the present (1907) he 
has had charge of two or three 
churches. Brother Golston is very 
earnest in his convictions and labors 
zealously for what he considers to be 
the best interest of the cause. 




JOHN E. GOODSON. 

Goodson, Elder John E. (M, D.), of 
Mo., was born December 30, 1819, at 
Seventy-Six, Ky., and was the fourth 



child of his father Samuel Goodson, 
who came from Virginia. His grand- 
father, Wm. Goodson was born in Vir- 
ginia, December 25, 1859, and was a 
lieutenant in Washington's army at 
the close of the Revolutionary war. 
When J. E. Goodson was seventeen 
years old, his father moved to Mis- 
souri. In December, 1843, he moved to 
Buchanan County, Mo., and in 1844, 
was baptized into El-Bethel Church by 
Elder J. M. Evans. He moved to Carroll 
County, Mo., in 1847 and there began 
the practice of medicine. In 1850, he 
was elected to the Missouri legislature 
from Carroll County and rode on 
horseback to attend the session. He 
began to talk publicly on the subject 
of religion in 1852, and in 1853 was 
ordained to the work of the ministry. 
He spent the years just previous to 
and in the beginning of the Civil war 
in Kansas and Missouri and had most 
of his property burned or stolen. In 
1863, he moved to Macon County, Mo., 
and was elected to the legislature 
from this county, serving three terms. 
Along about this time it was propos- 
ed to form a stock company to com- 
mence again the publication of the 
Regular Baptist Magazine, which had 
suspended for want of patronage. It 
was proposed to make Dr. Goodson 
president of the company and Elder 
E. H. Burnam editor. An although 
Dr. Goodson had made a provisional 
sale of the stock, when he discovered 
that Elder E. H. Burnam was not in 
accord with the principles of Prim- 
itive Baptists he refused to have any- 
thing more to do with the matter and 
it fell through. In 1874 he began the 
publication of the Messenger of 
Peace. At this time there were but 
three Primitive Baptist papers in the 
United States, and none of them were 
in the Western or Middle states. He 
now gave up the practice of medicine 
and devoted himself to editing the 
Messenger of Peace. For many years 
he was Moderator of the Yellow Creek 
Association, and was held in the 
highest regard, not only for his abil- 
ity as a preacher, but for his influence 
for peace and good order among the 
churches. Brethren came to look to 
him for direction because he could 
be depended on to be temperate, and 
always trying to soften down ex- 
tremes, and yet maintaining sound 
doctrine. A year before his death, 
which occurred September 16, 1892, 
he wrote: "I am now only waiting for 
the call of my clear Saviour to call me 
to my reward, let it be what it may. 
If it be good it is all on account of 
of what Jesus did for me, and not fbr 



116 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



what I have done. The nearer I ap- 
proach the end of life the more I am 
confirmed in the doctrine of salvation 
by free and unmerited grace of the 
Lord Jesus Christ." 




J. E. GOODSON. 

Goodson, Elder J. E., Jr., of Mis- 
souri, son of Elder J. E. Goodson, was 
born November 15, 1853, and died 
August 19, 1890. He was married to 
Miss Idress E. Dennison, December 
25, 1873. United with Chariton Church 
Macon County, Mo., in May, 1880, and 
commenced preaching two years later 
and was ordained to the full work of 
the ministry in May, 1884. Soon after 
the Messenger of Peace was establish- 
ed by his father in 1874, he became 
associated with his father in connec- 
tion with the paper. After his ordina- 
tion his time was all taken in preach- 
ing and his office work. Churches 
built up rapidly under his m,inistry, 
he being a very strong defender of the 
faith, and a man of! great personal 
magnetism. Large congregations 
flocked to hear him preach, and many 
who hated his doctrine were drawn 
to him by his evident earnestness and 
his love toward all men. He died of 
kidney trouble which had been prey- 
ing upon him several years, and it is 
safe to say that all Primitive Bap- 
tists who had come to know him felt 
a personal loss in his death. 



J. E. GORE. 

Gore, Elder J. E., of Philippi, W. Va., 
was born in Rappahannock County, Va., 
November 15, 1870, reared on the farm, 
given a hope in the Saviour when about 
twenty-two years of age, united with 
the Old School Baptists and was soon 
liberated to preach. Elder Gore is 
serving three churches in the bounds 
of the Red Stone Association. It was 
in this Association that Alexander 
Campbell first united with the Baptists 
and afterwards made war upon them. 



J. K. GOTCHER. 

Gotcher, Elder J. K., of Texas, was 
born 1845 and died October, 1907. He 
was baptized by Elder Joel Lewis of 
East Fork Church. Soon after this he 
joined Little Flock Church, was or- 
dained to the full work of the ministry. 
He was an able, humble, sound, con- 
sistent and orderly Primitive Baptist 
minister of Christ, and when in the 
liberty of his gift it seemed the great- 
est pleasure of his life to preach and 
comfort God's humble poor. His gift 
was almost exclusively in the strong 
doctrine of Christ and its sweet conso- 
lations to God's believing people. It 
was doubtless a heritage to him to 
endure many adverse circumstances 
in life, so was fulfilled in some measure 
at least the sweet oracle of God, 
"Many are the afflictions of the right- 
eous but the Lord delivereth out of 
them all." Psalms. He was a loving 
husband, kind father, faithful neigh- 
bor and a good citizen. 




WM. GRAFTON. 

Grafton, Elder Wm., of Forest Hill, 
Md., a very useful and able minister, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



117 



was born in 1825. He is now in his 
eighty-third year, and the forty-eighth 
year of his ministry, has for many years 
served as Moderator of the Baltimore 
Old School Baptist Association and is 
serving the same churches he com- 
menced with forty-eight years ago. Old 
Hartford Church of Maryland, the 
Rock Spring Church of Pennsylvania, 
and Warren Church, Baltimore County, 
Md. This is a wonderful record and a 
mere fatihful man could hardly be 
found. Though growing weak in body 
his mind is clear and strong and his 
zeal in his Master's cause unabated. 
With the apostle he can say, " I have 
fought a good fight," as will be testi- 
fied to by the brethren among whom he 
has so long labored. The usefulness of 
such a life can never be estimated, 
nor fully appreciated until lost to us. 



T. J. GRANTHAM. 

Grantham, Elder T. J., of Georgia, 
was born February 17, 1842, and died 
January 11, 1903. He joined the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in 1880, and was 
soon afterward ordained to preach. 
He was a man of lofty ideals and pure 
purposes; and, in all his public ca- 
reer, which was by no means exempt 
from trying experiences and stormy 
passages, he was never suspected of 
being dominated by motives un 
worthy the religion of his risen Lord. 
However others might differ with him 
in matters of judgment or policy, the 
honesty of his convictions was never 
impeached; the loyalty of his devotion 
to what he conceived to be right was 
never an open question. He was a 
man of clear and firm convictions — 
the stuff out of which heroes and 
martyrs are made. While profoundly 
deferential to the opinions of others, 
he never changed or surrendered his 
own, except at the end of convincing 
argument and fuller information. In 
the matter of principle he had the 
courage to stand alone, in his last 
hours he said he was not afraid to 
die by the principles he had advocat- 
ed; and, again, he said, "I know that 
my Redeemer liveth, and that He 
shall stand at the latter day upon the 
earth; and though after my skin 
worms may destroy this body, yet in 
my flesh shall I see God, whom I shall 
see for myself and mine eyes shall 
behold, and not another." And after a 
moment's pause, he continued: "I 
know whom I have trusted, and 
though He slay me, yet will I trust 
in Him." After a moment's rest, while 
panting for breath, he added: "I have 



already passed through the valley of 
the shadow of death, and I fear no 
evil, for Thou are with me,' and he 
passed away like a weary child going 
asleep in its mother's arms. 




BERNARD GREENWOOD. 

Greenwood, Elder Bernard was born 
in Weener, East Friesland, Kingdom 
(now Province) of Hanover, Germany, 
September 24, 1827, and died in his 
sixty-sixth year, in Wilson, N. C., Sep- 
tember 1, 1893. His parents were mem- 
bers of the Holland Reformed (a Pres- 
byterian State church) and had him 
sprinkled in infancy, and "confirmed" 
when fourteen years of age, at which 
time he was put to the tailor's trade in 
his father's workshop, and attended a 
high school two hours a day, excepting 
Saturday and Sunday. Though dead 
in sin, and enamored of the world, and 
having his head full of a do and live 
system of religion, he thought himself 
a good christian, until at sixteen years 
of age, he was awakened at midnight 
with the solmen and piercing words, 
"God is holy, what art thou?" For the 
first time seeing himself a hell-deserv- 
ing sinner, he wept aloud, and to his 
brother, who was in bed with him and 
heard him and asked him if he was 
sick he replied, "No, John, I am such 
an awful sinner." He betook himself 
to the reading of the Bible, and to 
prayers and tears and resolutions, but 
grew worse and worse until, when 
seeming about to sink into endless per- 
dition, he heard the crucified Saviour 
say to him: "Come unto me, thou 
weary and heavy laden, and I will give 
thee rest. I, even I, have blotted out 



118 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



all thy transgressions for my name's 
sake, and thy sins and thine iniquities 
will I remember no more." And his 
heart replied: "I have heard of thee 
by the hearing of the ear, but now mine 
eye seeth thee: wherefore, O Lord I 
abhor myself, and repent in dust and 
ashes." Then he rejoiced with un- 
speakable joy in God his Saviour. His 
parents and other relatives thought 
him greatly deluded, not being able to 
understand his case. At the age of 
twenty as required by the laws of his 
country he entered the army. At 
twenty-two he married and stayed a 
year in the place (Nienburg) where 
his wife's parents resided, and then re- 
turned, with his wife and child, to 
W'eener. A few days afterwards he 
heard his father's foreman tell of a 
poor, little sect of Free Grace Baptists 
just started in their town — humble, up- 
right, and inoffensive, but despised and 
persecuted by all other religionists. He 
sought their acquaintance and society, 
and though warned by his father, that, 
if he joined them, his customers would 
desert him, and he would starve his 
family, he united with them, and was 
baptized in 1S53 in the day-time — 
the other members having been bap- 
tized in the night-time for fear of their 
enemies, who would not only ridicule 
but also assault them. Then for several 
months he was indeed persecuted, and 
almost starved; but, in 1854, by the 
pecuniary assistance of his brother, 
John, who was an infidel and then 
living in Cincinnati, O., he and his wife 
emigrated to America, leaving their 
little boy most sorrowfully with his 
own parents, for want of money needed 
to bring him. Nearly three years after- 
wards the child was brought to his 
rejoicing parents by a younger brother 
of Elder Greenwood's. They lived in 
Cincinnati five months, and then moved 
to Clover, Clermont County, O., where 
in 1S56 they found a church of Old 
School Primitive Baptists who were 
like the F'ree Grace Baptists of Ger- 
many in both faith and practice. Clover 
Church licensed him to preach; and by 
the authority of the church at Lynch- 
burg of which he was then a member 
Elders Brooks and Hite ordained him 
to the ministry in 1861. In 1866 he 
moved to Evansville, Ind., (where he 
preached both in English and in Ger- 
man, and baptized several, and buried 
his only child, then nearly sixteen years 
old) ; in 1869 to Corydon, Ind.; in 1871, 
to Columbus, Ind., (where he lived eight 
years in worldly prosperity but in spir- 
itual poverty) ; and in January, 1880, 
to Wilson, N. C, where (with the ex- 
ception of about a .year at La Grange, 
N. C.J he and his wife lived till the 



time of his death. Elder Greenwood 
was solemn and earnest in prayer and 
preaching, saw and proclaimed Jesus 
in every text, felt himself to be nothing 
but a wretched sinner saved by grace 
alone, went down in great depths and 
rose to great heights in his experience, 
and gave every particle of the glory of 
salvation to the Lord. Few men were 
as ready as he to quote an appropriate 
passage of scripture on every occasion 
in life. He had his failings, as all of us 
have; and he would have been one of 
the last persons in the world to claim 
perfection in the flesh. His book en- 
titled: "The Dealings of God with a 
Laborer, or the Experiences of Bernard 
Greenwood,' is' indeed an interesting 
work. 



NEELEE GREENLEE. 

Greenlee, Eider Neelee, of Wlest 
Virginia, was born 1819, and died 
April 23, 1900. For forty-seven- years 
he was a preacher of the gospel and 
a strong defender of salvation by 
grace. He was a native of Macon 
County, and served churches within 
the bounds of the Pocatalico Associa- 
tion, but a full sketch of his life could 
not be obtained. 




JOHN GRIST. 

Grist, Elder John, of Crocket, Tenn., 
was born in Gibson County, Tenn., 
December 8, 1852; had poor advant- 
ages for obtaining an education — his 
father dying in his youth, and his 
mother not being able to educate him. 
From his early boyhood days he had 
serious thoughts about death and 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



119 



eternity, and in his twenty-fifth year 
of age was convicted of sin and shown 
his lost condition before God. For 
years he carried a burden and tried 
to get relief by moving to Logan 
County, Ark., but in vain. Not until 
about three years later — in 1880 — 
did he find rest in Jesus. In 1SS5 he 
united with the Primitive Baptists 
and amid the joys received in obedi- 
ence he was again burdened with a call 
to the ministerial work. Feeling he 
had not one essential qualification 
he resolved not to preach, but he 
could not help thinking about preach- 
ing when awake or from dreaming 
about it when asleep. The church saw 
and realized the burden of his mind 
and licensed him in 1887, and in Jan- 
uary, 1889, he was ordained to the full 
work. About the year 1899 Elder 
Grist. moved to his present home. He 
has had the care . of churches for 
about twenty years and is also the 
beloved Moderator of the Forked Deer 
Association; desires to contend for 
the good, old way, and to finish his 
course with joy. 



W. H. GULLEDGE. 

Gulledge, Elder W. H., died at his 
home in Norcross, Ga., January 8, 
1899; was seventy-four years, one 
month, and four days old, and was 
baptized into the fellowship of Nances 
Creek Church, DeKalb County, Ga., 
in 1857, by Elder H. D. Teet. Elder 
Gulledge was a conssistent Primitive 
Baptist, and was ordained and set 
apart to the full functions of the gos- 
pel ministry in May, 1874, by Elders 
W. W. Carroll, E. Webb and J. T. Jor- 
dan, and was an able expounder and 
defender of the gospel of our Saviour, 
Jesus Christ; a servant of the Master 
indeed. He sacrificed health and all 
to the cause he loved so well. 



R. B. GUND. 

Gund, Elder R. B., was for many 
years Moderator of the Tombigby As- 
sociation. He was a well beloved and 
useful minister. The editor regrets 
that a full sketch of his life cannot 
be obtained. 



H 



GARFIELD F. HACKLER. 

Hackler, Elder Garfield F., of North 
Carolina. This eminent and devoted 
minister of the gospel was a resident 
of Allegheny County; he was born 
January 1, 1834, united with Rock 
Creek Church 1855, licensed 18G8, and 
ordained to all the functions of the 
gospel 1S70. His useful life closed 
July 20, 1879. His patience was re- 
markable, his faith in the Lord strong, 
and so he seemed to pass over the 
river, fearing no evil. 



M. A. HACKWORTH. 

Hackworth, Elder M. A., of Anderson, 
Tenn., son of Jasper and Elizabeth 
Gance Hackworth, was born in Jackson 
County, Ala., on October 15, 1857. When 
he was quite small his father moved 
to Maricn County, Tenn., where he 
grew to manhood. He professed a hope 
in Christ in his twenty-first year and 
seven years later joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Cedar Springs, Mar- 
ion County, Tenn. He was married in 
1889 to Miss Charlotte West, and or- 
dained in 1895. Brother Hackworth is 



one of the most humble, unassuming 
and spiritually minded men and is 
highly esteemed by our people. 



A N. HALL. 

Hall, Elder A. N. (1816-1900), was 
born in Wake County, N. C. At the 
age of twenty-four or twenty-five 
years the Lord in His all-wise pur- 
pose, saw fit to call him from nature 
to grace. For thirteen months and 
eight days he was deeply convicted 
for his sins. His distress was so in- 
tense as to unfit him for business, 
and all social duties. He worked hard 
trying to do good, fasting and praying, 
until he ^\as a mere skeleton. After 
he had given up all hope of forgive- 
ness, feeling he would soon be in hell, 
the Lord spoke words of comfort, 
"Therefore being justified by faith 
we have peace with God through our 
Lord Jesus Christ." In an instant his 
burden was gone, all was peace and 
love; he felt that every sin was for- 
given, a new song was in his mouth, 
and he sang praises to God. Very soon 
he joined the church at Mt. Lebanon, 
and was soon called to the ministry. 



120 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Most of his ministerial work was done 
in Person County until 1859, having 
bought a farm there soon after his 
marriage, on which he lived and kept 
for his home the remainder of his 
days. He then traveled a good deal 
and preached in North Carolina and 
Virginia. He was cnosen pastor of 
four churches, which he served for 
twenty years; there being then two 
new churches built up under his min- 
istry, he was then called by them. 
One of these was Prospect Hill, in 
Caswell County, the other Shiloh, 
which is near his home. He served 
Prospect Hill twenty^flve years. It 
prospered under his ministry, and 
continued to build up. He continued 
as pastor of Shiloh as long as he 
liveu. He made all supplies on his 
farm, working with his own hands, 
not to be an incumbrance on the 
brethren. He was an excellent provid- 
er for his family. He had abiding 
faith in the doctrine of salvation by 
grace, which he preached fifty-seven 
years; his only regret was that he 
could not preach more. He tried to 
assure every one that this doctrine is 
the doctrine of Christ and the Apos- 
tles. He told several people he had 
preached from the mountains to the 
seashore a great many times, and had 
asserted that if any man would take 
the Bible and prove that what he 
preached was not the true doctrine he 
would retract, but not a man ever 
made the attempt. He had many won- 
derful experiences. His daughter 
writes of one thus: "I will tell you 
of a circumstance which occurred in 
1859. He retired as well as usual one 
night: sometime during the night we 
were awakened by his shouts, and he 
seemed to be so happy that it pros- 
trated him. He told us all he would 
soon be in heaven, and continued to 
clap his hands and shout praises to 
God for an hour or more. Wje really 
thought him dying, his limbs being 
cold. A physician was summoned 
against his protest, but he failed to 
diagnose the disease, as he was not 
sick. He continued in this way for 
two weeks. He was too weak in body 
to sit up, but was strong in spirit, and 
talked incessantly of heavenly things, 
desiring to depart and be with Christ. 
As soon as he was able to travel he 
told us he must leave home more than 
ever before, that God required him to 
go and preach the word, and He 
would take care of his family. For 
several months he seemed to be fill- 
ed with the Holy Ghost all the time, 
preaching day and night. 'Many were 
convicted and converted during his 



preaching at this time, and many 
were added to the church. Prior to 
this time he stammered so badly that 
it was with great difficulty he preach- 
ed; after this his tongue was loosed, 
and he spoke with comparative ease. 
I feel that God fulfilled His promise 
to him; his family have been wondei'- 
fully blessed. We had a good com- 
fortable home, never lacked for any 
necessities of life, and had good edu- 
cational advantages, all without going 
in debt. He never incurred a debt un- 
less he knew he could pay it." He 
passed through his long, useful minis- 
try without a stain on his garments. 



JAMES M. HALL. 

Hall, Elder James M-, of Vipers, 
Ky., was born January 22, 1855, and 
has lived all his life in Perry County. 
In his twelfth year he was made to 
realize his lost and ruined condition 
without Jesus, professed a hope in the 
Saviour in 1882, united with the 
church the fO'ilowing year and was or- 
dained in 1889. His labors have been 
mostly confined to the churches of the 
Sandlick Association, which body he 
has served as clerk, though, for lack 
of data, a fuller sketch of his life and 
labors could not .be given. 



JOHN C. HALL. 

Hall, Elder John C. (1827-1901), was 
the oldest son of William and Lucy Hall 
and was born in Pittsylvania County, 
Va. In about 1861 he removed to 
Franklin County, Va., where he lived 
up to the time of his death. As a fel- 
low citizen he grew in favor with those 
of his adopted county, and was en- 
trusted with much public service which 
he rendered faithfully and satisfactor- 
ily. For sixteen years he was com- 
missioner of revenue in his county, 
and for eight years was county treasur- 
er. He enjoyed the most implicit con- 
fidence of all classes with which be 
came in contact. He was held by all 
who knew him to be truthful, honest, 
conscientious and sincere. As a hus- 
band, he came not behind in its re- 
sponsibilities and duties, but loved his 
wife, or each of them, for he was twice 
married, and well, truly and faithfully 
kept inviolate, to the best of his ability, 
the pledges made to love, keep and pro- 
tect them in sickness and in health, 
and thus did he not only prove and 
maintain the true relationship of the 
husband, but that of a true minister of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



121 



the gospel and servant of churches as 
well. As a father he seems to have 
studied well the duties of such, and on 
all occasions did he endeavor to faith- 
fully and truly perform those duties. In 
his efforts to sustain the true 1 elation 
of a father to his children his aim 
seems to have been to live before them 
as he would have them to live before 
him, and with one another. When he 
grew up to manhood he was led into the 
ways of Arminianism and became to 
openly hate the way and doctrine of the 
Primitive Baptists and was exceedingly 
bitter against them and like a young 
lion dared to revile them, but the Lord 
sent an arrow into his heart, producing 
a wound from which he never recovered 
except as by the grace of God through 
the blood of Jesus Christ. His convic- 
tions were deep and pungent, his con- 
vertion was miraculous, and his deliv- 
erance clear and decided. He joined 
the church at White Oak Grove, Floyd 
County, Va., September 12, 1851, and 
was baptized the following day by 
Elder Owen Sumner, and having in him 
the faith that was in Paul, and being 
not disobedient to the heavenly vision 
which he had seen, and which all of 
God's called and sent servants see he 
conferred not with flesh and blood, 
but at the next meeting made his first 
attempt to preach. Being ready and ac- 
tive in business, Brother Hall was, in a 
few years chosen clerk of the New | 
River District Primitive Baptist Asso- 
ciation which office he filled faithfully 
and efficiently for about thirty years, 
leaving it vacant by his death. He was 
truly a pastor, and faithfully served 
four churches for about thirty-seven 
years, and in the last few years served 
two others. His labors were blessed 
to the churches. He baptized a great 
many as seals to his ministry, and 
therefore enjoyed the satisfaction of \ 
knowing that his labors were not in 
vain in the Lord. He was greatly de- | 
voted to th cause of his Master and to 
the churches he served. His gift was j 
that of a father, of which Paul says 
we have not many. His gift to know 
and proclaim the word, to administer 
tne ordinances, and to execute the dis- 
cipline and maintain the order of the 
gospel in the house of God constituted 
him one of the ablest ministers of the 
new testament of his day. A book 
might be written of this good man, and 
still something more might be said 
worthy of him. 



JOSEPH HALL. 

Hall, Elder Joseph of Hilliard, Ky.. 
was born March 29, 1864, convicted of 



sin in 1876, and for nine years tried 
many "ways and means" for relief, but 
all in vain. Jesus, the sinners' Friend, 
appeared to him in 1885, and he was 
given a good hope through grace. He 
united with Mill Stone Church, 1886, 
and was baptized by Elder Wm. R. 
Craft. In 1890 he was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry, and has 
since, been serving from two to five 
churches. Elder Hall has also served 
as clerk of the Union Association for 
nearly fifteen years, has married about 
seventy-five couples, served his native 
county in more than one public position 
and is a useful preacher. 



DRURY HALSEY. 

Halsey, Elder Drury, of West Vir- 
ginia, was the son of Robert and 
Polly Halsey, and was born in Gray- 
son County, Va., May 2, 1832; united 
with the Baptists at the age of sev- 
enteen; married to Miss Nancy Busic 
in his nineteenth year — which union 
was blessed with ten children; or- 
dained in 1868 and for twenty-six 
years was a true and faithful minis- 
ter. In his preaching it was Jesus all 
the way through, — a complete, all- 
sufficient Saviour. He died in the full 
triumphs of faith, March 3, 1894. 



WM. B. HALSEY. 

Halsey, Elder Drury, of West Vir- 
Virginia. was in his youth wild, reckless 
and without the love of God in his 
heart but when he was about twenty 
years old, was deeply convicted of sin 
and made to mourn greatly on account 
of his corrupt nature. But God who 
quickened him into divine life, gave 
him a view of Jesus as his sin-bearer, 
and called him to the work of the min- 
istry. In this he rebelled, and like 
Jonah of old, undertook to flee from 
the presence of the Lord, and from the 
land of his nativity. But God was with 
him, and he was made willing to pro- 
claim His truth. He was ordained by 
Fox Creek Church, 1864. His voice 
was loud and commanding, and but 
few ministers of his day excelled him 
in preaching the power and glory of 
God's salvation. 



ISAAC HAMBY. 

Hamby, Elder Isaac, of Conyers, Ga. 
Information of recent date relative to 
this faithful minister could not be ob- 
tained but from his writing published 



122 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



in 1884, it is learned that he was at that 
time in his seventy-eighth year, was 
then and had been for eighteen years, 
Moderator of the Yellow River Asso- 
ciation. He was born in Jackson 
County, Ga., September 20, 1806; united 
with Mt. Zion Church in Rockwell 
County, 1S29 and baptized by Elder 
George Daniel. Soon he was deeply 
impressed to preach the gospel of 
grace and in 1848, was ordained to the 
work by Elders Joel Colley, Willis C. 
Norris and Benton Daniel. He was a 
strong, earnest preacher, and opposed 
with all his abilities the modern Mis- 
sionary plan and all the institutions of 
men as auxiliaries to the Church of 
Christ and could well say, "I have kept 
the faith and fought a good fight." 



JAS. B. HAMILTON. 

Hamilton, Jas. B. (1819-18S7), was 
born and raised in South Carolina, 
and moved to Georgia at the age of 
nineteen and lived for some time in 
Bibb County. He subsequently remov- 
ed to Crawford County, where he 
lived several years and from there 
moved to Taylor County where the 
principal portion of his life was spent. 
He received a hope in Christ at about 
the age of twenty-five, and joined the 
Piimitive Baptist Church at Union, 
Crawford County, Ga., between the 
ages of twenty-five and thirty, and 
was baptized by Elder Asa Bell, and 
commenced preaching in 1835. He was 
the husband of four wives and the 
father of twenty-three children, thir- 
teen of whom are living. His life was 
one of many sore trials and afflic 
tions, having had fouiteen deaths in 
his family during his life — tfour wives 
and ten children. Brother Hamilton 
was, at his death, the oldest minister 
belonging to the Upatoie Association. 
He was a meek man, of gentle dispo- 
sition, and a sincere Primitive Bap- 
tist; and lived a spotless life, and 
died in the love and fellowship of his 
brethren. 



1865, baptized by Elder J. C. Hume- 
ordained 1875, and has preached ae 
ceptably among the Baptists in sev- 
eral states, but mostly in Illinois. 



W. P. HANDCOCK. 

Handcock, Elder W. P., of Eldorado, 
111., served churches within the 
bounds of Muddy River Association. 
In growing up he had no advantages 
of an education, but by close study 
and observation has acquired much 
information. He was convicted of sin, 
when about twenty-four years old, 
united with the Baptist Church in 




LEE HANKS. 

Hanks, Elder Lee, of Macon, Ga. was 
born in Pittsylvania County, Va., June 
13. 1861. His parents were not mem- 
bers of the church, but honest, moral 
upright people. They were poor and 
the effects of the cruel war left them 
quite destitute. After an illness of 
some years, Elder Hank's father died, 
April, 1869, and on the account of an old 
afflicted mother, who was unable to 
care for him his lot was cast among 
those who cruelly treated him. He was 
turned out as an orphan and had but 
little opportunity of school and had to 
work very hard, exposed to cold bare 
of clothes and but little to eat. He 
never was at an Old Baptist Church 
conference until the next Saturday aft- 
er he joined the church. He did not 
know the Old Baptists had local organ- 
ized churches until after he was iden- 
tified with them. When a small boy 
he felt deeply concerned about his fu- 
ture destiny and often resorted to se- 
cret places and engaged in humble 
prayer to God for mercy. His own 
strength and righteousness failed him. 
and, also he felt wholly condemned to 
die and that hell would be his awful 
doom. After a month (May, 1877) of 
darkness and gloom he obtained 
a sweet hope in Jesus, but in 
September, 1877, became so trou- 
bled he left Bland County, Va., 
and went to West Virginia. Among 
strangers, begging his way as a poor 
tramp, he hired to a Methodist in a 
neighborhood of Old Baptists. He went 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



123 



to hear these Baptists preach and it so 
filled his soul with gratitude to God to 
hear the sweet gospel and to see the 
image of Jesus in the members which 
made him feel that this is the Church 
of God for which he had been prayer- 
ully searching. Immediately he went 
to them and was received and baptized 
in the bounds of Indian Creek Associa- 
tion, W. Va., October, 1S77, though he 
was so poor he borrowed clothes to be 
baptized in. Soon he felt a mighty im- 
pression to preach and made his first 
attempt in 1879. Soon afterward he 
went to Georgia and was in 18S5, mar- 
ried to Miss L. L. Edwards; studied 
hard at night to procure an education, 
and after a hard struggle, obtained 
sufficient knowledge to teach school 
which he did for some years. The min- 
isterial labors of Elder Hanks have 
been mostly among the Baptists in 
Georgia, with the exception of nine 
years he lived at Ozark, Ala, where he 
had the care of several churches and 
was clerk of the Choctwhatchee Asso- 
ciation for eight years. His labors 
have been blessed of the Lord and he 
has baptized about five hundred be- 
lievers into the fellowship of his 
churches, among them his mother, wife, 
sister, two sisters-in-law and his son, 
has traveled and preached in twenty- 
two states, now has the care of four 
churches, has written an interesting 
book entitled "Conflicts of a Poor Sin- 
ner," is associate editor of the Gospel 
Messenger, and editor of the Southern 
Department of the Primitive Baptist, is 
an interesting speaker, able writer, 
and boldly, yet in love, contends for the 
doctrine and practice of the Apostolic 
Church. For his outspoken opposition 
to Burnan, Todd and Kirkland, as dis- 
turbers of the church, as well as for his 
decided stand in Georgia, against the 
introduction of instrumental music in 
churches he has suffered much per- 
secution, yet reviles not again, but 
craves peace among Old Baptists upon 
gospel principles. 



W, J. HARDESTY. 

Hardesty, Elder W. J., of Middle- 
town, Mo. The editor's efforts to 
procure data of a recent date from 
which to prepare a suitable sketch of 
Elder Hardesty proved in vain. The 
following information is found in Eld- 
er Cash's book published in 1S9G: 
"Elder Hardesty was born in Lincoln 
County, Mo , May 17, 1S48, and united 
with Bryant's Creek Church in same 



county, October 18, 1873. He was or- 
dained October 23, 1S90, and for some 
years has held himself ready to ans- 




W. J. HARDESTY 



wer calls for his services. He is pas- 
tor of three churches." 




L. H. HARDY. 

Hardy, Elder L. H., of Reidsville, 
N. C, was born 17th of Maich, 1853. 
His ancestors were French Hugenouts 
and bore the name Hardee. They 
came to this country in its early set- 
tlement, and many of them did valu- 
able service in the war for Independ- 
ence, and subsequent histoiy. The 



124 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



school advantages of Elder Hardy 
were limited, and interrupted entire- 
ly by the Civil war, which left his pa- 
rents poor. At the age of fourteen his 
school days ended, and he labored on 
the farm and in the shop. During his 
youth he had many interesting and 
impressive dreams; and though often 
impressed with serious thoughts and 
duties pertaining to his eternal wel- 
fare he tried to drive them off by 
attending dances and other worldly 
amusements. When about twenty 
years of age, after being burdened 
with a realization of inbred and prac- 
tical sin, he was given a sweet hope 
in Jesus, — the old song, 'Amazing 
Grace" became very dear to him, and 
a sweet peace rested in his heart that 
the world could not give, nor take 
away; and in July, 1873, he united 
with the church at Mewborns, and 
was soon impressed with the duty of 
preaching. This impression became 
so strong that he began to exercise 
his gift in May, 1874. He was ordain- 
ed to the full work of the ministry 
July, 1877, by Elders Bryan WMtford 
and Archibald Jones, and has since 
had the care of from two to five 
churches, some of them being built up 
under his ministry. Elder Hardy has 
traveled extensively and preached ac- 
ceptably, in many states. In his early 
ministry he sailed about fifteen hun- 
dred miles, walked about twelve hun- 
dred and rode in private conveyances 
about a thousand miles annually, in 
the service of his Master. During the 
year 1906 he preached two hundred 
and forty times and traveled 9,528 
miles, and yet Primitive Baptists are 
called anti-Missionaries, and charged 
with being opposed to preaching the 
gospel. This is because they, like the 
Apostles, are willing to spend and be 
spent in the Master's cause, going as 
they went, without guarantee from 
man, or boards of men for support, 
trusting God and looking alone to 
Him. Elder Hardy has baptized many, 
married quite a number of couples, 
served his people in different posi- 
tions always to his honor and their 
good, is an able expounder of the 
■\\ ord and a sweet experimental 
preacher. He is the beloved Moderat- 
or of the Country Line Primitive Bap- 
tist Association. 



J. B. HARDY, Jr. 

Hardy, Elder J. B. Jr., of Croft, 
Kan., was born in Crittenden County, 
Ky., December 1G, 18C9; professed a 
hope in Jesus quite young; joined the 



Primitive Baptist Church in Barton 
County, Kan., at the age of eighteen, 
and was ordained to the work of the 
ministry May 7. 1898, by orders of 
Wolf Creek Church, Saline County, 
111., since which time he has served 
as pastor from two to four churches 
until 1905, when he moved to his 




J. B. HARDY, JR. 

present home and accepted the care 
of Pleasant Valley Primitive Baptist 
Church, Kingman County, Kan. He 
still bias the care of this church. In 
1908 Elder Hardy became joint editor 
with Elder J. W. Fairchild of the Foot- 
prints of the Flock, and is an able ad- 
vocate of the doctrine of grace. 



JOHN B. HARDEE. 

Hardee, Elder John B., son of Abram 
and Polina Hardee, was born March 19, 
1841, and died June 25 1896. In the 
spring of 1S82, he professed a hope in 
Christ, and was baptized the following 
September. Soon after uniting with 
the church, he had impressions to 
preach, which gave him much trouble. 
Much he suffered, feeling his unworth- 
iness, yet like Paul he was not dis- 
obedient to the heavenly calling. In 
August, 1884, he was liberated by the 
church to exercise his gift, and in 
November, 1886, was ordained to the 
work of the gospel ministry. He served 
churches until his death and was a 
faithful soldier of Jesus, a good citizen, 
affectionate husband and good neighbor 



THOS. HARGIS. 

Hargis Elder Thos., was a native of 
Marion County, Tenn. His member- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



125 



ship was at Oak Grove Church on 
Battle Creek. After a life of) useful- 
ness he fell asleep in Jesus sometime 
in the seventies. Further data not ob- 
tainable. 

E. W. HARLAND. 

Harland, Elder E. W., of Conners- 
ville, Ind. This beloved minister is 
pastor of Lick Creek, Cedar Creek 
and Eagle's Creek Churches in the 
bounds of the White Water Associa- 
tion of Regular Baptists of Indiana. 
He is also the able Moderator of this 
Association and is highly esteemed 
as a faithful pastor. 



SAMUEL D. HARLAN. 

Harlan, Elder Samuel' D. (1831- 
19u5), son of Mathew and Jemina 
Harlan, was married to Mary Kirk- 
patrick of Rush County 1852; united 
with the Baptist church at Village 
Creek, 1849, ordained to the work of 
the ministry in 1855, and for over half 
a century, stood firm in his Master's 
cause, which was dearer than his 
own life. He was ever ready to speak 
of his hope and defend the doctrine. 
He traveled many miles through 
storm and heat to lift the blood-stain- 
ed banner of King Jesus, and say, 
"Behold the Lamb of God." He was a 
safe counsellor, a devoted husband, a 
kind father, an obliging neighbor, a 
man above reproach. His Christian 
character was the ripened fruit, the 
growth of many years in the Masters 
vineyard. During his life and in his 
death he gave grand testimony of the 
joys of heaven that awaited him. Dur- 
ing more than three score years and 
ten of his earthly career, he erected, 
in his own character, to the memory 
of his Saviour a monument, which 
will grow the brighter, as the cease- 
less ages register their duration upon 
the dial of eternity. There is nothing 
in the life of Elder Harlan, that more 
forcibly challenges our admiration 
and demands our imitation, than his 
supreme devotion to the church of the 
living God. When dark clouds hov- 
ered over our Master's cause, He was 
ever ready to cheer the hearts of the 
despondent; and it can be truly said 
of him that he died at his post, a 
faithful, loval soldier. 



MATTHEW D. HARLAN. 

Harlan, Elder Matthew D., (1854- 
1902), was a son of Samuel and Mary 
Harlan, of Indiana. At the age of 



seventeen, he received a hope in Christ 
and joined the Primitive Baptist church 
at East Fork, Rush County, Ind. In May, 
1881, he was ordained as a gospel min- 
ister. He lived for the good he mignt 
do. He was ever ready to sacrifice self 
for the pleasure and happiness and 
associations, but above all, he loved 
God and found his greatest pleasure 
in doing his will, and in trying to lead 
others to a throne of grace. His life is 
a legacy to all who knew him, and was 
such that death had no sting for him. 
He said he had no fears of death, and 
that he was ready and willing to go at 
any time his Master called him. He 
was a good neighbor, an earnest and 
conscientious christian a faithful ser- 
vant of his Master. 




JAMES HARPER. 

Harper, Elder James. (1810-1SS6), 
of Illinois, was born in Lewis Coun- 
ty, Ky., December 24, 1810. He was 
ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry on the first Saturday in August, 
1871. He was very highly esteemed by 
those for whom he labored, and it is 
regretted that a full sketch of his 
life and labors could not be obtained. 



WM. H. HARRELL. 

Harrell, Elder Wm. H., of Dallas, 
Texas. The editor's efforts to secure 
information from which to prepare a 
suitable sketch proved fruitless and 
he inserts the following notice of 
Elder Harrell, which appears in Elder 



126 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Potter's souvenir book, published 
1895; "Elder Harrell was born in 
Georgia, on the 13th day of July, 1846, 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
in July, 1877, was ordained to the 
work of the ministry in July, 1884, 
and is now pastor of two churches. 
He is the evangelist of Texas." 



THEOPHILUS HARRIS. 

Harris, Elder, Theophilus (1768-1841) 
of Pennsylvania, was born in Wales, 
and emigrated to this country in the 
year 1794, and was for some time there- 
after engaged in mercantile pursuits 
in Alexandria; but for the last thirty 
years of his life he was a diligent and 
untiring laborer in the Lord's vineyard. 
The doctrine of the cross of Christ was 
his constant and in fact his only theme, 
and no weather was too inclement for 
him to attend the sanctuary, even to 
the date of his last illness. He was a 
zealous and powerful advocate for the 
doctrine of particular and personal re- 
demption through the blood and right- 
eousness of our blessed Lord, and, 
never yielding to the seductive allure- 
ments of the times, he boldly and on 
every suitable occasion denounced the 
insidious errors of Fullerism, and 
stood manly up, bearing testimony to 
the truth as it is in Jesus. Nothing gave 
him more sincere joy than to behold 
the dear lambs of Christ renouncing the 
deceitful and evanescent ties of this 
world and publicly embracing the cause 
of their Lord and Saviour. 



T. F. HARRISON. 

Harrison, Elder T. F., of Oak Level 
Ky. Recent information of Elder Har- 
rison could not be obtained, but from 
Elder Potter's Souvenir book published, 
1895, it is learned that he was born in 
North Carolina, September 1, 1839; 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
church, July, 1864; was ordained to the 
ministry, August, 1869 and was then 
pastor of three churches. 



ALDEN L. HARRISON. 

Harrison, Elder Alden L., of Ply- 
mouth, N. C., the son of Isaac and 
Sabra E. Harrison, was born near 
Plymouth, N. C, April 3, 1874, and is 
the youngest of fourteen children. He 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Morrattock, Washington County, 



N. C., in January, 1894; and was bap- 
tized by his brother, Elder N. H. Har- 
rison. In March, 1897, he was licensed 
and ordained to the full work of the 
ministry in May, 1900, by Elders N. 
H. Harrison and M. T. Lawrence. 
Was married December, 1898, 
to Miss Hattie P. Lawrence, 




ALDEN L. HARRISON 

daughter of Elder ML T. Lawrence, 
and great granddaughter of Elder 
Joshua Lawrence. They have three 
children, Emily, Thomas and Alice. 
Elder Harrison serves the ■ church at 
Morrattock as associate pastor and is 
also pastor of Cross Roads Church in 
Edgecombe County, N. C. 



A. J. HARRISON. 

Harrison, Elder A. J., of Columbia, 
S. C. This worthy and humble minis- 
ter has for many years held a gov- 
ernment position in connection with 
the state house at South Carolina's 
capital; yet he has, as opportunity 
has presented, preached among the 
churches of the state. Elder Harrison 
was also sent by the people of his 
county — Hampton — to the famous 
Constitutional Convention of 1895. He 
is a worthy citizen, trusted officer, 
kind neighbor and esteemed minister 
of the Primitive or Old School Bap- 
tist Church. 



ROBERT H. HARRIS. 

Harris, Elder Robert H., of Edge- 
combe County, N. C, was born and 
raised in Person County, N. C, and 
moved to Edgecombe County soon af- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



127 



tei- the war. He, in his youthful days, 
united with the Methodist denomina- 
tion, and while with them he felt sat- 
isfied for a while until it pleased the 
Lord to show him the exceeding sin- 
fulness and depravity of his heart; 
then he said he felt like the greatest 
sin he ever committed in all his life 
was the partaking of the Lord's sup- 
per among them, making it appear 
that he was a Christian when he had 
no evidence of the fact. Soon after he 
moved to Edgecombe County it was 
the will of the Lord to fully open the 
eyes of his understanding and cause 
him to see indeed and in truth that 
he was a vile and helpless sinner in 
the sight of a just and holy God, and 
he suffered very severely until he 
was delivered by a bright and glo- 
rious manifestation of Christ as his 
Saviour; after which, feeling it to be 
his duty, he offered himself to and 
was received into the fellowship of 
the church at Cross Roads, Edge- 
combe County, N. C, April IS, 18GS, 
and was baptized by Elder John W- 
Purvis. The church soon discovered 
that he was called to a more noble 
work, and consequently licensed him 
and soon afterwards he was ordained 
as a minister. He was firm and well es- 
tablished in doctrine and practice, 
yet was charitable , tender hearted 
and ever ready to forgive the erring. 
He was a man that possessed great 
boldness of speech in declaring the 
truth and exposing error, both in and 
out of the church, and for this he was 
not esteemed by many; but he labor- 
ed for the answer of a good con- 
science toward his God and his puri- 
ty from the blood cf all men. 



JOSIAH HARRIS. 

Harris, Elder Josiah, of DuQuoin, 111., 
was born in the state of Illinois, on 
May 26, 1833, joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church on Saturday before the 
third Sunday in February, 1860, and 
was ordained to the work of the minis- 
try in September, 1864, This brief no- 
tice of Elder Harris is from Elder 
Potter's book published 1895 and the 
editor regrets that a more suitable 
sketch could not appear. 



JOSEPH HARTLEY. 

Hartley, Elder Joseph, of Kentucky, 
was one of the pioneer preachers of his 
day. He was born in Harden County, 
February 28, 1800, professed a hope in 



Jesus and united with the Baptists 
during the troublesome times of the di- 
vision between the Old and New School 
and remained firm in the Apostle's 
doctrine and practice, was well known 
in Southern Illinois, Indiana and Ken- 
tucky, moved to Oregon in the Sixties 
and died there August 13, 1867. 



PHILANDER HARTWELL. 

Hartwell, Elder Philander, (1854- 
1879), of New Jersey. As a minister of 
the gospel, a faithful preacher of the 
fullness of the unsearchable richness 
of Christ, Elder Hartwell had few, if 
any, superiors. He was peculiarly en- 
dowed with the gifts and grace essen- 
tial to a faithful pastor, and his labors 
of love in the churches over which he 
so long occupied the position of pastor 
will long be remembered by those to 
whom he was so dear for the truth's 
sake. Not only was he faithful as a 
pastor, but he was faithful as a friend, 
and in all the relation of life his 
character was unblemished. Elder 
Hartwell, at the time of his death, and 
for many years previous, was pastor 
of Hopewell Church, Hopewell, N. J. 
the second oldest Old School Baptist 
Church in the United States, and the 
bne that has, perhaps, the largest 
membership. During his pastorate the 
church was signally blessed, and re- 
ceived at different times ingatherings. 
He administered the ordinances of 
baptism to one hundred and eighty- 
eight persons who were added to the 
First Hopewell Church — how many he 
baptized into the communion of the 
Second Hopewell or Harborton Church 
is not known, but a considerable num- 
ber. He married two hundred and 
ninety-four couples, and attended about 
three hundred funerals, within the last 
twelve years of his life. With such a 
life it is not strange that so many fa- 
milies feel themselves sadly bereaved 
— and so many sympathizing friends 
came up to the house of mourning to 
testify their respect to the deceased 
and to mingle their tears with the des- 
olated ones. Among other instances of 
respect and sympathy may, with pro- 
priety, be noticed, the magnificent 
floral offering from the teachers of the 
model School of Princeton, of which 
Mr. A. W. Hartwell is principal, and the 
closing of the other houses of worship 
in the village of Hopewell, pastors and 
congregations attending the funeral 
services. 



128 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 




C. B. HASSELL. 

Hassell, Elder C. B., of North Caro 
lina. For forty-five years a minister, 
and for about twenty-five years, per- 
haps, the leading minister of the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in North Carolina, 
died at his home in Williamston, N. C, 
April 11, 1880. He was born October 
14, 1808, sent to school at irregular in- 
tervals from his third to his fifteenth 
year at which time his father, Joshua 
N. Hassell died and he was called from 
school to support his mother, whose 
maiden name was Martha Biggs. At 
school he was noted for his aptness to 
learn, his steady, moral habits and 
serious disposition, and when in his 
eighteenth year entered into the fol- 
lowing five resolutions: "To abstain 
from the use of intoxicating liquors 
tobacco, gaming and profanity, and to 
be strictly honest, truthful and upright > 
in all his dealings." At an early age 
he entered the mercantile profession 
and followed it, quite successfully all 
his life, and for many years he also suc- 
cessfully filled the following positions, 
Trustee of the Williamston Academy; 
Founder, Secretary, Treasurer and Li- 
brarian of the Williamston Library As- 
sociation; Trustee and Member of the 
Board of Examiners of the University 
of North Carolina; Agent of the Chair- 
man of the Board of Superintendents of 
Common Schools of Martin County, 
transacting all the laborious and diffi- 
cult work of that office; Clerk and 
Master in Equity for Martin County; 
President of the Roanoke Steam Navi- 
gation Company; Treasurer of Martin 
County, only four votes in the county 
being cast against him; was chosen 
delegate to the State Convention, Feb- 
ruary, 1861, and he served as delegate 
to the important Constitutional State 



Convention of 1875. He was twice mar- 
ried; first in 1832 to Mary Davis, who 
died in 1846. In 1849 he was married 
to Martha Maria Jewett of Warwick 
N. Y., the widow of Elder Daniel E. 
Jewett. When about twenty years old 
he was deeply convicted of sin, fled 
to the law for refuge and after vainly 
trying to keep the law was given a view 
and sweet hope in Jesus and made to 
feel that He alone was the end of the 
law for righteousness to every one that 
believeth, united with Skewarkey, 
Church and was baptized by Elder Jo- 
seph Biggs, March 1828, chosen dea- 
con in 1833, licensed to preach in 1840, 
and ordained in 1842 by Elders James 
Osborn, Jos. Biggs and William Whit- 
aker. He was immediately called to 
the service of churches and was in 1859 
chosen Moderator of the Kehukee Asso- 
ciation, and was continually re-elected 
till his death. During his ministry he 
assisted in twenty-five ordinations, 
baptized three hundred and thirty per- 
sons, married ninety-six couples, 
preached about 2100 sermons and 
traveled many thousands of miles, 
visiting churches and associations in 
the United States and Canada^ never 
charging for his labors, but going in 
the way the apostles went, believing 
that the Bible plan was all suffiicent 
and the only one that glorifies God and 
benefits man. 




SYLVESTER HASSELL. 

Hassell, Elder Sylvester, of Wil- 
liamston, N. C, minister, historian, 
teacher, is, perhaps, the best author- 
ity on church history in North Caro- 
lina, and stands among the foremost 
thinkers ami writers cf the United 
States. His ancestors came from Eng- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



129 



land to North Carolina in the Eigh- 
teenth century. His parents were Eld- 
er C. B. Hassell and his first wife, 
Mary Davis. He was born in Wlil- 
liamston, N. O, on the lot where he 
still lives, July 28, 1842; educated at 
the Wliliiamston Academy and the 
University of North Carolina, taking 
a high stand at both and graduating 
with honors. He is proficient in sev- 
eral languages, was principal of a 
school for young men, in Wilson N. 
C, and professor of languages in a 
northern college for some years. He 
published, in 1886, the Church His- 
tory, the most complete work of its 
kind ever published by our people, 
and a monument more lasting than 
granite, to him and his father, who 
began the work. In 1892 he became 
associate editor of the Gospel Mes- 
sage, and in 1S9G, its proprietor and 
managing editor. Of the dozen or 
more religious periodicals published 
among our people, the Gospel Mes- 
senger, is perhaps, the most schol- 
arly, and is a source of extensive 
valuable information as well as a safe 
counsellor in doctrine and practice. 
Elder Hassell has been twice mar- 
ried, first to Mary Isabella Yarrell, 
in 1869. His second wife to whom he 
was married, in 1876, was Francis 
Louisa Woodard. This gifted brother 
received a hope in Christ August 17, 
1863, was baptized by his father, Jan- 
uary 10, 1871, and ordained August 9, 
1874. He is the beloved pastor of 
Skewarky and Great Swamp 

Churches, and the Moderator of the 
Old Kehukee Association. He has 
traveled extensively in the United 
States, and has, a few times, visited 
Canada on preaching tours. His ser- 
vices are much sought after, his 
preaching not "with enticing words of 
man's wisdom, but in demonstration 
of the Spirit of God, and his views, on 
various subjects greatly sought for, 
he having, — since his becoming edit- 
or of the Messenger, received and 
answered thousands of letters, annu- 
ally. A remarkable characteristic of 
Elder Hassell, and one noted by all 
who are associated with him, is his 
great learning, and his great humility. 
Though blessed with much learning, 
he — like the great Apostle to the Gen- 
tiles, — is not, by it, made mad, but 
with soberness, speaks the truth in 
love. He makes no effort to display 
his wisdom, but manifests the sweet 
simplicity of a child, and one can 
hardly be with him without learning 
some lesson of humility, love and 
service to others. Elder Hassell is not 
only a sweet preacher, and able writer, 



but is deserving the title among Bap- 
tists, as The Peace-Maker. A great 
portion of his life has been spent in 
the worthy effort to unify our people, 
to remove offenses and establish fel- 
lowship upon the doctrine and prac- 
tice of Christ and the Apostles, and 
we feel God has greatly blessed him 
in this and that he shall possess the 
peace-makers' reward. Recently Elder 
R. W. Thompson writes of him: 
"Brother Hassell is one of the most 
humble, loving, gentle, kind and es- 
timable men among men; yet he is 
strong, firm, fearless and able in de- 
fense of the truth for truth's sake, the 
glory of God, the good and comfort 
and peace of all the redeemed and 
saved in the Lord, for whom he has 
the greatest concern and the most 
tender regard. He is considered one 
of the ablest, wisest and safest ex- 
ponents of the literal and spiritual 
interpretation of the Scriptures we 
have; holding them unmixed with the 
doctrines and new-born theories of 
men; zealously opposing all depar- 
tures in doctrine or practice, defend- 
ing the purity of the gospel church in 
its apostolic doctrine and practice." 



ABNER HAVOLDSON. 

Havoldson, Elder Abner (1770-1843) 
of Hopkins County, Ky., was an able 
and uncompromising minister of the 
gospel of Christ. His labors were 
mostly confined to churches within the 
bounds of the Highland Association. 




WILLIAM HAWKINS. 

Hawkins, Elder William (1826-1894), 
of Virginia, was born in Ashe County, 
N. C, and died at his home On Rock 



130 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Creek, Grayson County, Va. He was 
in 1851 married to Miss Mary J. Mc- 
Bride; professed a hope in Jesus in 
1856, and joined Rock Creek Church 
same year; was baptized by Elder 
Enoch Reeves, ordained deacon in 1868,. 
licensed to preach in 1870 and in 1872 
was ordained to the ministerial work 
by Elders George Douglas, Thomas 
Carr, W'm. Lundy, B. E. Caudill, S. M. 
Dicky and G. Hackler. Until his death 
he was in the service of churches and 
served as Moderator of the Mountain 
Association the last two years of his 
life. He traveled thousands of miles 
through all kinds of weather preaching 
the gospel of love without charge, and 
was honored and esteemed by those 
among whom he so faithfully labored- 
Bold and uncompromising with error 
he earnestly contended for the faith 
once delivered to the saints. Salva- 
tion by grace, and practical godliness 
were the main themes of his preach- 
ing. 



A. B. HAWKS. 

Hawks, Elder A. B., was born April 
19, 1857, in Grayson County, Va. He 
was married to Sylvina daughter of 
Mark R. and Lucinda Simcox in De- 
cember, 187S. This union was blessed 
with five sons and three daughters, 
all o. whom are living except one in- 
fant which preceded him to the glory 
land. He was known as being a very 
moral boy in youth — professed a hope 
in his eighteenth year and united with 
the Methodists. He stayed with them 
about three years but becoming dis- 
satisfied with the doctrine they 
preached, believing it was not in ac- 
cord with the Scriptures, he withdrew 
from them and joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church. Soon after uniting 
with the church he felt impressed by 
the Spirit to stand as a watchman 
on the walls of Zion, but viewing his 
weakness and unworthiness, he 
strove against this impression for 
some years. He was finally made to 
yield, and with fear and trembling- 
came before the church in August, 
1892, and asked for liberty to speak 
an public. His request was gladly com- 
plied with and on the following day 
made his first effort to proclaim the 
glad tidings of salvation. His educa- 
tion was so deficient that he could 
scarcely read intelligently, yet he had 
wonderful understanding in regard to 
the Scriptures. The church, seeing his 
gift, he was ordained in 1897. He was 
soon called to take the pastoral care 
of several churches, whicn he served 
faithfully until his death. 



W. R. HELMES. 

Helms, Elder W. R., of Charlotte, 
N. C, was born in Union County, N. 
C, April 19, 1858, became deeply 
convicted of sin in 1873, blessed with 
a hope in Christ in 1874 and joined 
the Primitive Baptist Church at 
High Hill and baptized in 1881. He 
began to speak in public in 1898 and 
was ordained some three years later. 
He was raised on the farm where he 
has lived most of his life. Elder 
Helmes is a modest, quiet, unassum- 
ing, good and humble man and very 
much beloved and speaks to the com- 
fort of the church. 




J. E. W. HENDERSON. 

Henderson, Elder J. E. W., of Troy, 
Ala., was born January 23, 1839. His 
father, John D. Henderson, and moth- 
er, Sarah Thompson, were natives of 
South Carolina, and were members off 
the Baptist Church before the divi- 
sion in 1832. His father devoted his 
life to hard, manual labor, but never 
accumulated much property, and at 
the age when children are commonly 
put into school he was unable to af- 
ford the subject of this sketch such 
advantage, and he grew up to man- 
hood without education, having spent 
only about two months in school dur- 
in his life. He served in the Confed- 
erate army for a term of three years 
and three months; and while this de- 
prived him of the comforts of home 
and the society of loved ones (hav- 
ing a precious wife and three children 
sat home), it pleased the Lord of 
heaven and earth to visit him with 
quickening power; and on the 11th 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



131 



day of August, 1862, he felt a powerful 
sense of his pardoning mercy which 
left him in possession of a precious 
hope that all will be well with him 
beyond this vale of sorrow and afflic- 
tion. Having obtained leave of ab- 
sence from the army, in August, 18G3, 
he visited his family, and attended 
and united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Hopeful, Russell Coun- 
tl, Ala., and was baptized by Elder L. 
B. Porter. He was in IS 71 ordained 
by Elders Wm. M. Mitchell and C. S. 
Tate, at Mt. Olive Church, and 
though now about seventy years old 
— (1908)— yet is serving three 
churches regularly. Elder Henderson 
is associate editor of the Gospel Mes- 
senger, is a fluent and able writer, a 
gifted preacher, and fully satsified 
with the doctrine and practice of the 
apostolic church and wishes to apply 
alone the principles and practices to 
his own churches. His writings are 
greatly enjoyed by readers of The 
Messenger. 



T. R. HENDRICKS. 

Hendricks, Elder T. R., was born 
August 4, 1836, died October 20, 1907. 
He joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Clear Creek, Henry County, 
Tenn., when about eighteen years old 
and was baptized by Elder T. L. Dan- 
iel. He soon began to talk in public 
at school houses in the neighborhood. 
He felt that he could not be content 
unless he preached the gospel; so for 
mar,y years ne was a regular attend- 
ant at the meetings of the churches, 
taking an active part in the services. 
The writer does not know when he 
was ordained to the work of the min- 
istry; however, after his ordination 
he served the churches at Clear 
Creek, Bethlehem and Beaverdam as 
pastor for a number of years. He was 
known as an humble God-fearing man 
who loved the truth of salvation by 
grace. His walk was orderly, a good 
citizen and neighbor, and very atten- 
tive to the sick and afflicted. 



W. J. HESS. 

Hess, Elder W. J., was born in 
Waverly, Bremer County, Iowa, in 
1855, In 1867, with his parents, who 
were Old School Baptists, he mcved 
to Oregon, settling near Portland. 
Next he moved to Clatsop County, 
where in May, 1877, he professed a 
hope in Christ and was baptized in 



Lewis and Clark river by Elder J. A. 
Bullock. He was married to Miss So- 
nora A. Flanary in 1878, and in the 
fall of that year moved to Klickitat 
County, Washington Territory, locat- 
ing near Goldendale where he contin- 
ued to live until the fall of 1900, when 
he moved to Yakima County, his pres- 
ent home. He was ordained to the 
gospel ministry in October, 1902, and 
the following November was called to 
be pastor of Pleasant Grove Church 
where, "by the grace and mercy of 
God." he writes, "I continue to this 
day teaching, in much weakness, that 
salvation, both for time and eternity, 
is by grace through faith from first 
to last." 

DANIEL HESS. 

Hess, Elder Daniel, was born Oc- 
tober 14, 1827, in the state of Ohio, 
and died very suddenly in company, 
with his wife and other friends on a 
street car in Atlanta, Ga., December 
3, 1905. The. life of Elder Hess as a 
Baptist is one of the grandest dis- 
plays of the doctrine of salvation by 
grace that has been in modern times. 
He was raised in the lap of luxury, 
being very wealthy, and of course was 
reared in the high circles of life, yet 
the Mighty God who rules heaven and 
earth brought him to see that he was 
nothing but a miserable sinner, and 
revealed Jesus Christ to him as the 
hope of his salvation, directed him to 
the Old Baptists when he did not 
know there -u as such a people on 
earth. His travels to the church and 
his call to the ministry were wonder- 
ful indeed. He was a great blessing 
to the Baptists, every ready to lend 
a helping hand to those who were in 
need, was one of the best fireside 
conversationalists, and always en- 
couraging the Lord's people to the dis- 
charge of duty by forsaking the world 
and taking up their cross and follow- 
ing their Lord and Master in all the 
ordinances of the gospel. There was 
no respect of persons with him; he 
was the same humble, child-like Chris- 
tian in the home of the poor that he 
was in the stately mansion of the 
rich. He was twice married. His first 
wife was Miss Eliza Shattuck, of his 
native state, who died about ten years 
ago, while living in Columbus, Ga. A 
few years later he married Mrs. Kate 
Green, the widow of the late Alfred 
Green, of Atlanta. 



JOHN C. HEWITT. 

Hewitt, Elder John C, of North 

Carolina, was born in Jones County, 



132 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



in January, 1822, and united with 
White Oak Church in Jones County, 
in 1853, and was baptized by Elder 
Josiah Smith; was ordained in 18G2, 
and was a zealous and fearless 
preacher. As a man he was sincerely 
esteemed and loved for bis meek and 
humble spirit and godly deportment. 
Elder Hewitt was a member of the 
White Oak Association, a band of 
brethren true and humble, affection- 
ate and kind to each other. Our min- 
istering brethren who visit among 
them will testify to the sincerity and 
godliness of their character. He died 
in 1884 in the full triumph of faith 
he had preached to others. 



WM. HICKMAN. 

Hickman, Elder William H., was 
born in Indiana on the 29th day of 
March, 1843, and joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church in 1870, and was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry in 
1876. For want of late information 
this brief notice of Elder Hickman is 
taken from Elder Potter's book pub- 
lished in 1895. 



I. D, HIGDON 

Higdon, Elder I. D. (1818-1894)., was 
born in Barren County, Ky., and 
united with the Primitive Baptists in 
1837. He moved to Iowa in 1840, and 
was ordained to the full work of the 
ministry in 18G8. He moved to Mis- 
souri in the year 1873, where he died 
February 23, his membership being 
with Marion Church, Ray County, Mo. 
His love for pure doctrine and a g'od- 
ly life commended him to the house- 
hold of faith, and it is regretted that 
a full sketch of his life cannot be 

given. 1 — 

H. M. HIGGINBOTHAM. 

Higginbotham, Elder H, M. (1806- 
1886), of Georgia, and for thirty-four 
years a faithful minister. His name 
will ever fill a pleasant place in the 
memory of the church at Providence, 
and indeed with all lovers of the pre- 
cious truths of the gospel who kne-w 
him. He was a man of- unblemished 
character; strictly honest in all his 
dealings with his fellow man. As a 
citizen, or good neighbor, he had no 
superior; as a Christian, he lived 
without a blot on his religious pro- 
fession, and as a minister of the gos- 
pel, he was sound, faithful and un- 
compromising. It can truly be said cf 
him that he was an able gospel min- 
ister; strictly apostolic in all his 
preaching and practice, opposing, 



with all the powers of his might, the 
new isms of the day. Fiona the day 
he united with the church until the 
day of his death, he stood firm in the 
doctrine of salvation by grace, and 
grace alone. He was a strong believer 
and defender of the doctrine of pre- 
destination, God's electing love, ef- 
fectual calling and the final persever- 
ance of the saints in grace. He ignor- 
ed all auxiliary institutions gotten up 
by man to aid God in the salvation of 
poor sinners, or to add to the pro- 
gress of the church; claiming that 
God's plan of saving sinners was a 
perfect plan, and that "Jesus," who 
is the Saviour of his people, is mighty 
and able to save, and that his Spirit, 
grace and perfect law of liberty, 
which He has given Zion for her 
prosperity and happiness, is sufficient 
and will prevail in her preservation, so 
that the gates of hell shall never pre- 
vail against her. And to presume to 
add to the work of his Spirit, grace 
and his precious rule, is high pre- 
sumption, and a mark of the beast. A 
volume might be written concerning 
the faith, hope, walk and able teach- 
ings of Elder Higginbothem, how faith- 
fully he served churches in Alabama 
and Georgia, but suffice it to say that 
he was loyal to his blessed Master un- 
to death, and as we believe is now 
realizing in spirit immortality, while 
his body is sweetly sleeping in Jesus. 




G. E. HIGDON. 

Higdon, Elder G. E., of Knoxville, 
Tenn., was born in Wapello County, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



133 



Iowa, June 12, 1850, and moved to 
Missouri in the year 1873. He united 
with Marion Church, Ray County, 
Mo., on the fourth Saturday in April, 
1886, was licensed to preach in 1891, 
and ordained to the full work of the 
ministry in 1893. He has the care of 
four churches and is zealous in the 
cause. This brief sketch from Elder 
Cash's book published 1896, and is 
inserted for want of data from which 
to prepare a more complete sketch. 



HENRY HILL. 

Hill, Elder Henry (1805-1884), of 
Missouri, was born in Kentucky, Jan- 
uary 2, 1805, and joined the Primitive 
Baptists in that state Moved to Mis- 
souri, and he was identified with the 
Baptists in the first settlement of the 
country- In the year 1832, he was 
elected clerk of Fishing River Asso- 
ciation, and in the year 1838 became 
Moderator of that well known body 
of Baptists, and served in that capac- 
ity twenty-nine years, standing firmly 
against all innovations in doctrine and 

practice. ■ — 

J. M. HINDS. 

Hinds, Elder J. M., of Lenoir,Tenn., 
is a. faithful under-shepherd in the 
Master's kingdom, has the care of 
churches within the bounds of the 
Hiwassee Association of Primitive 
Baptists and is the beloved 'Modera- 
tor of this body. 




LEVI V. HITE. 

Hite, Elder Levi V., of Marion, O. 
This highly esteemed minister was 
born in Wyandotte County, O., August 



14, 1869, and reared by O'ld School 
Baptist parents; his father being a 
deacon in Rocky Fork Church and his 
mother a sister of Elder L. B. Sher- 
wood. He realized his sinful condition 
in early life, received a hope in Christ 
in October, 1887, united with the 
above named church October, 1890, 
and was baptized by Elder L. E. 
Thomas at which time he received his 
first impression to preach. But he 
kept this to himself — or tried to — 
and did not begin speaking in public 
until September, 1898. In February, 
1902, he was ordained by Elders A. 
F. Dove, L. E. Thomas and A. S. 
Shoemaker. Elder Hite is now serving 
three churches regularly and his 
labors have been blessed to the com- 
fort and edification of God's humble 
poor, and to the ingathering and build- 
ing up of the church. He was on Octo- 
ber 13, 1892, married to Miss Adah 
"Williams. 



D. L. HITCHCOCK. 

Hitchcock, Elder D. L., of Georgia, 
died very suddenly at Eatonton, Put- 
nam County, Ga., October 1, 1903, in 
his ninetieth year. He had been a 
Primitive Baptist for about seventy- 
five years and a faithful minister of 
the gospel for over sixty years. To 
say that his life has always been an 
exemplary one, and his ministry a 
firm, faithful, and acceptable one with 
his brethren, does but feebly express 
the many virtues and life of this 
good man. He was great in goodness, 
and gcod in greatness. His counsel 
and advice was good and always ap- 
preciated by all who knew him. As a 
citizen he was a noble man. As a 
Christian and gospel minister he was 
a shining light; none' ever knew him 
but to respect and love him. He was 
for over thirty years Moderator of the 
Ocmulgee Association, and was a 
great gift to the church. 



CHARLES HODGES. 

Hodges, Elder Charles, of Missis- 
sippi, who died about 1857, was fqr 
many years the Moderator of the 
Tombigby Association, and was able 
in doctrine, exhortation and discipline. 
He was also noted for his gift of sing- 
ing. Further information of the life 
and labors of this faithful minister 
cannot be abtained, hence this brief 
sketcn. 



134 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 




H. C. HOGAN. 

Hogan, Elder H. C, of Dickson, 
Term. For the last twenty years Elder 
Hogan has been preaching Jesus the 
way, the truth and the life. He has, 
perhaps traveled more and done more 
evagelistic work than any other min- 
ister of his age, among our people. He 
was born in Obion County, Tenn., July 
1, 1864, raised by Primitive Baptist 
parents — his father uniting with the 
church in his fiftieth year of age; 
had serious thoughts about death and 
eternity from early childhood, but 
this did not keep him from being 
stubborn and rough with his little 
sisters. The first sermon that made 
any serious impression upon him v as 
preached by Elder T. S. Dalton, from 
the text, "Ye must be born again." 
This bore heavily on his mind, and 
soon the full weight of his condem- 
nation before God rested on him. But 
God gave relief in Jesus and a love 
for the dear old church, but for two 
years he lingered outside the fold 
feeling two young and timid as there 
were no young people members of the 
old church. However, when about fif- 
teen years of age he joined Cane 
Creek Church and was baptized by 
Elder N. G. Phillips. He was ordain- 
ed Dec, 1887, by Elders J. K. Stephen 
and S. F'. Cayce. In a recent publica- 
tion Elder Hogan says: "I served 
churches in Middle Tennessee about 
seven years, but have given them all 
up now and devote all my time to 
traveling. I am anxious to be of some 
comfort to God's people and glorify 
my blessed Master. I am especially 
anxious to go to destitute places 



where the gospel is not preached, as 
the apostle says, 'in the regions be- 
yond.' I have traveled in twenty-three 
states, Indian Territory and District 
of Columbia. I have traveled as many 
as ten thousand miles in a year. I 
pray the Lord to guide my footsteps 
in such a way that I may never bring 
reproach on His blessed cause." 




WILLIAM HOGAN. 

Hogan, Elder William, of Illinois, 
was born March 10, 1814, and united 
with New Salem Church, Brown 
County, Ills., in February, 1842. He 
was ordained in May, 1843, and died 
September 6, 1869. From Elder Cash's 
book, 1896. Further information of 
Elder Hogan's life and labors could 
not be obtained. 



R. M. HOGGATT. 

Hoggatt, Elder R. M., of Ashton, 
Kan., was born in Macoupin County, 
Ills., March 19, 1839, and received a 
hope when he was seventeen years of 
age. He first united with the New 
School Baptists, but becoming dis- 
satisfied with them joined Drywood 
Church of Primitive Baptists in Bour- 
bon County, Kan., in August, 1876. He 
was ordained February 10, 1883, and 
has served a part of the time since as 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



135 



pastor of churches, but prefers to be 
free and visit destitute places. This 
brief sketch of Elder Hoggatt from 




R. M. HOGGATT 



Elder Cash's book and for want of 
later information is inserted. 



J. D. HOLLIS. 

Hollis, Elder J. D., of Oklahoma, 
was born in Troup County, Georgia, 
October 11, 1S54; moved with his pa- 
rents to Texas in 1857; was married 
to Sophronia Wood November 3, 1878, 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church, Mt. Pisgah, in Hopkins Coun- 
ty, Texas, in October, 1881; baptized 
by Elder William Caudle; ordained to 
the ministry in 1882 by Elders John 
Owen, and W. W. Slaughter. He was a 
gifted minister, and after a life of 
usefulness and faithful service died 
October, 1907. 



R. V. HOLLEMAN. 

Holleman, Elder R. V., of Wealthy, 
Texas. The subject of this sketch was 
born at Oak Flat, in Rush County, 
Texas, August, 28, 1874, moved with 
his parents to Leon County, in 1884, 
raised on a farm with but few advant- 
ages of an education, but by study 
and close application acquired con- 
siderable information and business 
education, and is at present postmast- 
er at his home town and also conduct- 



ing a mercantile business. Elder 
Holleman was convicted of sin when 
about fifteen years of age, made to 
cry for mercy and plead the publi- 
can's prayer — ."Lord be merciful to 
me a sinner," was given a sweet and 
abiding hope in Jesus, united with 
Union Primitive Baptist Church in 
October, 1894, and baptized by Elder 
J. C. Denton. In 1901 he was licensed 
to preach, was in the constitution of 




R. V. HOLLEMAN 

Mt. Zion Church of Wealthy, Texas, in 
1904, and was the following year or- 
dained to the gospel ministry by Eld- 
ers J. C. Collier and H. White. Has 
since been serving churches and now 
has the care of Shiloh, Mt. Zion and 
Fellowship churches. December 15, 
1907, he was married to Miss Eva M. 
Gilbert — a loyal member of the 
church with her husband, 



ZEBULON HOLLIDAY. 

Holliday, Elder Zebulon, of Thurs- 
ton, O., was born in Ohio on the 22nd 
of February,, 1839, joined the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church in 1S76, and was 
ordained to the work of the ministry 
in 1884. This brief notice is from Eld- 
er Potter's book published is 1895. 
The editor regrets that data for a full 
sketch could not be secured. 



LONNIE HOLLOWAY. 

Holloway, Elder Lonnie, of Gray- 
mont, Ga. This brother is perhaps the 
youngest minister among our people 
today. Born Januay 13, 1890, began 
preaching when eighteen, and was or- 



136 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



dained by Rcsemary Church Novem- 
ber 7, 1908, the following ministers 
officiating: Elders H. Temple, S. M. 
Anderson and H. B. Wilkison. Elder 
Holloway was raised by Baptist pa- 
rents, convicted of sin in his four- 
teenth year, fled to the law for justi- 
fication but was by the law condemn- 
ed to eternal punishment, and that 
justly; groped in darkness and was 
without hope until Jesus arose with 
healings in His wings, became his 
sin-bearer and he was by faith, en- 
abled to trust in His blood and plead 
His righteousness. He was also given 
a love for the dear old church but, 
for several months lingered around 



Baptist Association. He is also Mod- 
erator of this association and is high- 
ly esteemed among his people. 




LONNIE HOLLOWAY 

the fold, feeling too unworthy to. enter 
therein. But in August, 1905, he was 
received into the fellowship of the 
Rosemary Church and baptized by 
Elder H. Temple. Of his ministry Eld- 
er Holloway writes: "I feel too young 
and unworthy to engage in the sweet 
service of God, but how glad I feel 
and how I desire to thank and adore 
the name of the Lord, for His mercies 
to poor me. I am now, not quite nine- 
teen years old, and oh, how I desire 
that God's people will pray for me. 
^h, may I though young, honor the 
high profession of God our Saviour.' 



WM. HOLLINGSWORTH. 

Hollingsworth, Elder Wm., of Whig- 
ham, Ga. This faithful under-shepherd 
has the care of Tired Creek, Pisgah, 
Piedmont and Trinity churches in 



J. W. HOLMAN. 

Holman, Elder J. W., of Tennessee, 
was born March 1, 1812, professed a 
hope in Christ when very young, 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
of Jesus Christ at Mt. Moriah in 
May, 1826, and remained firm in the 
faith throughout his long and useful 
life. He was an humble and beloved 
member of the church near sixty-six 
years, during which time several doc- 
trinal troubles arose that gave much 
distress, but none of these new things 
moved him; he remained unshaken. 
Freewillism, Campbellism, Missionism 
and Two-seedism all had their rise 
during his life in the church; but all 
alike failed to move him from his first 
love. Elder Holman was in the minis- 
try over fifty years and served as 
Moderator of Elk River Association 
over twenty years. He ranked among 
the ablest ministers of Middle Ten- 
nessee. His great theme, upcn which 
he loved to dwell, was salvation by 
free and unmerited grace, bestowed 
on poor sinners of Adam's race — and 
thus a sinner saved by grace. His 
long and faithful ministry endeared 
him to his many brethren so greatly 
that they will long cherish his mem- 
ory. He was respectful and courteous 
towards those from whom he differed, 
yet firm and uncompromising in the 
defense or support of the Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ. As a minister 
his labors were wondelfully blessed 
to the comfort of God's children. As 
a husband he was devoted and con- 
fiding, providing for the comforts of 
this life bountifully, a kind and in- 
dulgent father, good neighbor, and 
loyal citizen. He died February 21, 
1892. 

SAMUEL HOLT. 

Holt, Elder Samuel, of North Caro- 
lina, was born 1807, united with the 
Primitive Baptists at Yopp's Church 
Onslow County; was received by let- 
ter in full fellowship in Southwest 
Church and there remained until his 
death. Information relative to his life 
and labors could not be obtained. 



LEWIS HON. 

Hon, Elder Lewis, of Illinois was 
born in Bowman's Bend, White Coun- 
ty, 111., 1828, and his entire life was 



the bounds of the original Flint River : spent in the vicinity of his birthplace. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



131 



The Hods moved to Illinois in 1812, 
six years before the state was admit- 
ted to the union. The parents of Eld- 
er Hon began life under the many 
ditticulties tnat beset the people of 
limited means in those days, and the 
subject of this sketch had but little 
opportunity to acquire an education. 
In those days hard work occupied a 
large portion of a boy's life and the 
boys in the Hon family were no ex- 
ception. Consequently Elder Hon 




.... :.m\?: 




LEWIS HON 







grew to rugged manhood, with an ed- 
ucation gained chiefly by experience 
and brief periods at the primitive 
schools of those days. He was married 
four times. His first wife was Miss 
Lucinda Heart, to whom he was mar- 
ried in 1847. They became the pa- 
rents of two children. After a few 
years death dissolved this union, and 
in 1854 he was married to Miss Mary 
Hunsinger. Fourteen children blessed 
this union. But death claimed her, 
and some years afterward he was 
united in marriage to Mrs. Sarah 
Ralls, who lived to bless his home and 
comfort his life until 1904. His last 
marriage, to Mrs, Mary Poole, of In- 
diana, took place in May, 1905. Again 
his home was honored with a devoted 
Christian helpmate who served him 
most tenderly and faithfully, until he 
gently fell asleep at their beautiful 
home in Crossville, 111., April 17, 1908, 
at the ripe old age of seventy-nine. 
Father Hon received a sweet assur- 
ance of the forgiveness of sins about 
sixty years ago, and soon after joined 
the Little Wabash Primitive Baptist 
Church where he remained faithful 
till death. He was ordained July, 1870, 
which exalted position he filled with 
credit to himself and honor to the 



cause he loved and the God who call- 
ed him, for almost half a century. He 
was a man of strong convictions, be- 
ing uncompromising in defending the 
doctrine of his church, yet kind and 
gentle with all who opposed him. He 
was ever at his post, not only in re- 
ligious revivals, but in the times of 
declination as well. But few men have 
traveled and preached so much with 
as little financial reward. In fact he 
contributed much more to the cause 
than he ever received. He was modera- 
tor of the Skillet Fork Association 
for many years — till failing health 
prevented, and was pastor of his home 
church at the time of his death. Of 
his ten children which grew to man- 
hood and womanhood, he baptized 
nine, and had the assurance that the 
other one is a subject of God's cov- 
enant love and a firm believer in the 
doctrine his father preached. 




D. HOPPER. 

Hopper, Elder D., of Jackson, Tenn., 
was born February 4, 1852, reared 
under the influence of the new school 
or Missionary Baptists; obtained a 
hope in Christ in 1869 and united with 
the Missionaries soon after and was 
ordained by them 1877. For twenty 
years he labored among these people, 
trying to teach them the sure salva- 
tion of God's elect, even without mis- 
sionary plans of man's devising, at 
the same time learning more and 
more of the history of their church, 
and becoming more and more opposed 
to many of its unscriptural practices, 
until he boldly and alone, openly op- 
posed in their association, the plans of 
their missionarv board. But in vain 



138 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



did he plead with his brethren to give 
up their unscriptural doctrine and 
practice; and following the scriptural 
injunction, he came out from among 
them, and united with the Primitive, 
or Old School Baptist in 1903 and was 
baptized by Elder J. L. Butler. The 
baptizing occurred about 10 o'clock a. 
m., he was ordained at 11 a. m. and 
preached at 11:30 a. m. to a large con- 
course of people. It was a struggle to 
leave a people he had so long been 
with, who had nothing against him, 
and he nothing against them, only the 
doctrine and practice of God's word 
dividing them. He, like Moses, was 
enabled to choose to suffer affliction 
with the people of God. Elder Hopper 
has, since coming among us, been 
serving churches; is an able preacher 
and fluent writer. 




JOHN W. HOPPER. 

Hopper, Eider John W., of Washing- 
ton C. H, Ohio, was born in Fay- 
ette County, November 26, 1848; mar- 
ried to Miss Rebecca J. Waddle, 
April, 1871, with whom he lived hap- 
pily for eight years when she died, 
and he was, November, 1880, married 
to Miss Ann Waddle. His wives were 
sisters and both members of the 
Primitive Baptist Church. Elder Hop- 
pes united with Paint Creek 
Church, December, 1877, and 
was baptized by Elder Wal- 
ter Yoeman. In 1879 he was 
licensed, and May 21, 1881, was or- 
dained by Elders Tunis Ashbrook, 
Coiwin Reed and Walter Yoeman and 
has since had the care of churches 
until about three years ago when on 
account of ill health, he declined serv- 



ing as regular pastor, but travels 
among the churches. He has served 
as Moderator of the Scioto Associa- 
tion and is well and favorably known 
among the Baptists of his country. 
In his young days Elder Hoppes 
taught school, but since has followed 
farming as a worldly profession and 
has been very successful, owning now 
about eleven hundred acres of land 
in his native county. When asked 
why he was so successful financially 
he has often said he attributed it to 
the blessings of God and to being obe- 
dient to the Master in faithfully and 
freely serving the churches for the 
past twenty years. 




A. HORNER. 

Horenr, Elder A., of Waterloo, Ore., 
was born in Barry County, Mo., De- 
cember 6, 1858. After his father's 

death in 1865, he with his mother, 
moved to Oregon and settled near 
Oregon City. November 21, 1878, he 
was married to Miss Nancy D. Sav- 
age. In 1881 he was convicted Of sin 
and after about three long years of 
darkness and thunderings of Mt. 
Siani's law he was given a hope in 
Jesus as the end of the law for right- 
eousness. Being in correspondence 
with Elder George Mayfield he travel- 
ed, by private conveyance, seventy 
miles to meet with Pleasant Grove 
Church, offered himself for member- 
ship, was received and baptized by 
Elder James A. Bullock May, 1S84. In 
August, 1897, he was ordained to tht; 
full work of the ministry and has 
since been preaching Jesus, the way, 
the truth and the life. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



139 




ASA HOWARD. 

Howard, Elder Asa, of Weatherford, 
Texas. Not being able to secure later 
information of Elder Howard, the ed- 
itor quotes the following from Elder 
Cash's book published in 1896: "Elder 
Howard, was born in Springfield, Mo., 
February 28, 1846, and joined Clear 
Creek Church, near Weatherford, 
Texas, in July, 1865. He was ordained 
in July, 1869, and has devoted much 
of his time to preaching the gcspel." 



DAVID HOUSE. 

House, Elder, David, (1816-1894). 
This gifted preacher was born in Pitt 
County, N. C. He was the son of 
John and Nicey House and grew up a 
very quiet and moral boy, suffered 
much under the conviction of sin and 
was delivered from his burden of sin 
and condemnation at his plow while at 
work in the field. His deliverance was 
very bright, and his faith in God was 
strong and of an unfaltering nature, 
all the days of his life afterwards. He 
was received for baptism, 1847, to 
the church at Great Swamp and 
was licensed during the year to 
the exercises of his gift, and in 
November, 1853, was ordained to 
the full work of the gospel ministry 
by a presbytery consisting of Elders 
John H. Daniel and Lanier Griffin. He 
was a zealous and faithful minister of 
the gospel and during his life traveled 
as many miles, and preached as much 
for the churches in his own country 



about home as any that can be found, 
as well as serving his own church in a 
faithful and acceptable manner. The 
churches that he served, although not 
blessed with as great ingatherings as. 
some, were blessed with sweet seasons 
of peace and harmony under his serv- 
ice, no doubt due in a great degree to 
his sound and able ministry and wise 
counsel and exhortation which he gave 
them, coupled with the bright example 
which he set before them, for he was 
a living epistle of Christ known and 
read of all men and even those who did 
not believe the doctrine he preached 
were constrained to say he lived his 
religion. 



JOHN C. HUBBARD. 

Hubbard, Elder John C-, was one of 
God's faithful servants who has cross- 
ed over the river to join the saints of 
God on the other shore. He was born 
in Southern Virginia, January 16, 
1824, and united with the church Au- 
gust, 1846, and was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry September, 
1850. Feeling that he was called to- 
labor in another field, he and his 
wife called for letters from Jacks 
Creek Church at their Septembei 
meeting 1852, and soon after 
moved to West Virginia. The 
next year — 1853 — he was made Moder- 
ator of the Indian Creek Association 
which place he filled with satis- 
faction until 1901 when owing to his 
afflictions he could not attend. He la- 
bored much among the churches and 
had the care of several, and still was 
retained as pastor of Flat Woods and 
New River churches until his death. 
He traveled much through cold and 
neat, storm and calm to declare the 
watchman and hesitated not to give 
the alarm when he saw the wolf com- 
ing. He was a tender and loving shep- 
herd, yet faithful and true, and had 
no fellowship for the unfruitful works 
of darkness, yet his manner of preach- 
ing was such none could say it was 
not true, and all lovers of truth loved 
to hear him. He used no rough expres- 
sions about those who differed from 
him, but simply preached the word, 
reproved, rebuked with all long suf- 
fering and doctrine; in almost every 
sermon telling his little flock how 
they ought to live and walk as chil- 
dren of God. He wanted to see all 
who professed the name of Christ 
adorn that profession by a godly walk. 



140 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



WM. HUBBARD. 

Hubbard, Elder Wm. was born in 
South Carolina on the 22d day of April, 
1809. His parents, John and Mary 
Hubbard, moved to Hall County, Ga., 
in 1818, taking him with them, then a 
boy nine years of age. He joined 
the church called Liberty in Lumpkin 
County, Ga., and was baptized by Elder 
James Whitten, June, 1831, and soon 
after was ordained to the ministry. 
At the time Elder Hubbard was or- 
dained there were no so called 'Mis- 
sionary Baptists, but shortly after- 
wards the great question of foreign 
missions and the institutions of the 
day sprang up to the dividing of the 
Baptist denomination. And in this, 
question which threatened the destruc- 
tion of the church, he took the side 
of the Primitive Church, and main- 
tained it until death. In this great 
controversy public sentiment and pre- 
judice ran so high that he was threat- 
ened by a mob; and on one occasion, 
when threatened at Valley Grove 
Church, in Murray County, a company 
of young men rode up by him, when he 
was nearing the church, with clubs in 
their hands, and saluted him very po- 
litely. They rode along together on 
horseback and when they arrived at 
the church, he hitched his horse, and 
the young men hitched theirs close by 
his, and all went into the church to- 
gether, he taking the stand, and the 
young men taking seats near by. After 
services, a conference was held in 
which was considerable confusion and 
discussion on the mooted question of 
missions. After conference the 
meeting adjourned, and he and the 
young men who sat by so attentively 
rode away. Upon inquiry it was as- 
certained that these young men had 
heard that certain citizens, and per- 
haps some members of the church, 
who were favorable to the Arminian 
cause, intended to mob him, and his 
opinion was the Lord put it into the 
hearts and minds of these young men 
to protect him. This, however, was 
unknown to him until after it had 
happened. Though an uneducated man. 
Elder Hubbard was one of God's min- 
isters. He preached fifty-three years 
in the Primitive Baptist ranks without 
a charge against him so far as known 
by the writer, and having been called 
upon to fill the highest positions within 
the gift of the churches. He was Mod- 
erator of several Associations during 
his ministerial career including the 
Lpatoie, Harmony and Flint River. 




J. D. HUBBELL. 



Hubbell, Elder J. D., of Kelly's Cor- 
ner, N. Y. The following is some quo- 
tations from Hubbell's life work kept 
and written by himself: "I was born 
July S, 1S3G, if the family record be 
true, which I do not doubt. When 
near two years old I was attacked 
with brain fever and came so near the 
end of my days, in the sight of my 
parents and physicians, that my grave 
clothes were partially prepared but 
as my days were not all then num- 
bered, I was restored to health al- 
though my sickness was of a nature 
as to change the shape of my head 
which is a little deformed yet, al- 
though I have great reason for grati- 
tude to my Creator for allotting me a 
reasonable degree of earthly wisdom. 
My Summer school education was fin- 
ished when about twelve years old 
and my school going finished alto- 
gether when about nineteen years of 
age. In the year 1855 I discovered my 
helplessness and lost condition as a 
sinner, and in the latter part of 1858 
having received a hope, I united with 
the second Old School Baptist Church 
of Roxbury in 1859 of which I am now 
a member. Shortly after I received a 
hope I was impressed or inspired -with 
the duty of preaching the gospel and 
after a while was licensed to preach. 
While a licentiate I traveled many 
thousand miles over the country at- 
tending funerals and trying in my 
weak way to feed some of the scat- 
tered flock. On September 13, 1872, I 
was set apart by solemn ordination to 
the work of the ministry having up 
to this time attended 130 funerals, 
trying to comfort the broken hearted 
and having baptized seventeen." Eld- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



141 



er Hubbell was one of the most pop- 
ular and well known ministers in Del- 
aware County, and being well known 
along the line of the Ulster & Dela- 
ware R. R., Greene and Schohaire 
Counties, having traveled over the 
counties at all times, day and night, 
through sunshine and stormy weather, 
prone to obey the will of his Master. 
Having officiated at 517 funerals, 
scores of baptisms and over 200 wed- 
dings, goes to show the high esteem 
and popularity in which he was held 
by the community in which he has 
always lived. To his enemies, while 
they be few if any, he applied the 
golden rule, and thus left them to their 
own reflections. 




W. P. HUDSON. 

Hudson, Elder W. P., of Arkansas, 
was born in Dickson County, Tenn., 
May 2, 1852; moved to Texas in 1868, 
and the following year to Washington 
County, Ark., where he has since re- 
sided. He was, in his seventeenth 
year, convicted of sin, and after much 
soul sorrow, doubts and fears was 
given a hope in the Saviour and unit- 
ed with the Primitive Baptists. He 
was soon impressed with the duty of 
preaching Jesus to others and was 
ordained at Bethlehem Church in 1886, 
by Elders J. S. Cowan, R. M. Wood 
and J. R. Bolinger, since which time 
he has endeavored to give his best 
service to the cause, and can truly 
say: 

"I love Thy kingdom, Lord; 

The house of Thine abode: 
The church our blest Redeemer saved 

With His own precious blood." 



E. P. HUDSON. 

Hudson, Elder E. P., of North Caro- 
lina, was born June 27, 1822, in the 
neighborhood of Juniper Bay, at which 
place he was reared, and continued to 
live till a few years past, when he 
moved to the north side of Mattamus- 
keet Lake. He was said to be a very 
wild, bad boy, and remained so during 
the early part of manhood, desecrating 
the Sabbath by fishing and hunting 
with gun and dogs, paying no respect 
to religious worship, until the Lord 
in his mercy killed in him the love of 
the sports of the world by his Spirit 
and caused him to cry unto him for 
mercy, which he was pleased to grant 
him by clothing him with his imputed 
righteousness, which caused him ever 
afterwards to have no confidence in 
the works of the flesh, but to give all 
honor and glory to the works of the 
Spirit. He joined the church at North 
Lake, 1876, was baptized by Elder Al- 
bert Cartwright, some time after which 
he felt to be called by his divine Mas- 
ter to preach the unsearchable riches 
of the gospel of Christ. Thus we see 
that the Lord is able to tame the wild- 
est and most profane of his people by 
the inward working of his Holy Spirit. 



THOMAS HUDSON. 

Hudson, Elder Thomas was born 
April 20, 1859, and died at his home in 
Allegheny County, N. C, July 3, 1880. 
He united with the church in his 
seventeenth year, was licensed to 
preach in his nineteenth year, and died 
in his twenty-second year of age. His 
was a short service in the Masters' 
vineyard but noted for loyalty and 
zeal. 



JOEL HUME. 

Hume, Elder Joel, of Owensville, 
Ind., was born in Kentucky on the 13tb 
day of June, 1807, joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church in 1831, and was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry in 
1836. He served five churches for a 
time, and was pastor of one at the time 
of his death. He was a man of extra- 
ordinary natural ability a very impres- 
sive speaker and wonderful force of 
character. In the prime of his life, 
his preaching was mostly on the de- 
fensive style, yet he baptized a great 
many. He engaged in several oral 
debates, two of which were published. 
He moved to Indiana early in life, and 



142 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



soon after located in Posey County, 
and most of his time for the last fifty 
years of his life, was spent in laboring 
for the cause of Christ among the 
■churches composing Salem Association 
and for more than forty years he 
served as Moderator for the Associa- 
tion. He was an able minister, an hon- 
est, sincere, uncompromising soldier 
of the Cross, walking in the fellowship 
of Christ and all the household of 
faith, and who, at the time the call 
came, was truly as the shock of corn, 
fully ripe and ready for the Master's 
use and who without doubt is now with 
the Lord, resting from all his labors. 
He died March 29, 1891, in the eighty- 
fourth year of his age. 



CYRUS HUMPHREY. 

Humphrey, Elder Cyrus. This es- 
teemed brother was born in Ohio in 
1822 and died 1892. He was married 
in 1844 to Miss Henrietta Baughman. 
They raised a family of ten children. 
Elder Humphrey was a faithful pas- 
tor and served churches until his 
death, and the editor regrets that he 
cannot obtain sufficient data for an 
extended notice of his life and labors. 



S. H. HUMPHREY. 

Humphrey, Elder S. H., of Gales- 
burg, Ills., son of the late Elder Cy- 
rus Humphrey, was born near Asto- 
ria, Fulton County, Ills., 1850. In the 
Spring of 1864 he became concerned 
about his future but did not realize 
what was the trouble until about six 
months later, when he was brought to 
realize that he was condemned before 
God. In 1866 he felt the forgiveness 
of sins and was made to rejoice in 
hope of eternal life. Almost simulta- 
neous in the reception of that hope 
came impressions to tell how great 
things the Lord had done for him, 
and to publish the name of Jesus 
abroad. He united with the Friend- 
ship Church of Old School Baptists 
1S68, and was baptized by Elder A. 
Goforth and soon after began to exer- 
cise in public. He was ordained to the 
full work of the gospel ministry 
1884, and has had the care of from 
three to five churches for about forty 
years. In the last fifteen years he has 
traveled about 2,500 miles each year 
in the interest of the churches, and 
his services have been blessed of! the 
Lord to the building up of the broken 
walls of Zion. 



GEO. W. HUNDLY. 

Hundly, Elder Geo. W., of Swansville 
Va., was born in Pittsylvania County, 
Va., February 5, 1847. In childhood he 
had thoughts of death and eternity and 
early in life was convicted of sin, 
received a hope in Jesus when about 
nineteen years old and joined the Mis- 
sionary Baptist Church. Soon became 
dissatisfied with them and in 1872 
joined the Primitive Baptists. He had 
impressions to preach before he left 
the Missionaries but could not feel to 
endorse or preach the doctrine they 
advocated. He was ordaind by the 
Primitive Baptists about the year 1874 
and has served from two to five 
churches. He is a faithful pastor and 
serves the flock not for the fleece, but 
for the love he has for them. 



JEREMIAH HUNSINGER. 

Hunsinger, Elder Jeremiah, cf Car- 
mi, Ills., was born in White County, 
Ills., on the 10th day of September, 
1S36, and joined the Primitive Bap- 
tist Chruch in 1865, and was ordained 
to the work of the ministry in 1888. 
This notice of Elder Hunsinger is 
from Elder Potter's book of 1895. The 
editor's efforts to obtain further in- 
formation proved fruitless. 



M. F. HURST. 

Hurst, Elder M. F., of Georgia, was 
born in 1841, and died, 1902. He was 
the son of John and Elizabeth Hurst, 
and the youngest of thirteen children. 
He served in the Confederate war, 
and while there was enabled to see and 
feel that he was a sinner, condemned 
by God's holy law, and felt that he was 
doomed to eternal woe and misery. 
While he was prostrate on a bed of 
affliction, and while friends stood 
around him expecting to see him 
breathe his last, Jesus was revealed 
to him as his Saviour, the "chiefest 
among ten thousand and altogether 
lovely." He then revived and rejoiced 
and told his friends he was not going 
to die now, but would live to tell of the 
riches of God's grace in saving sinners 
from eternal ruin through the merits 
of God's dear Son. In 1864 he was 
baptized by Elder W. M. Mitchell, and 
was in 1877, ordained to the ministry. 
From then till the very day of his death 
he proclaimed salvation by grace, and 
grace alone, through the merits of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



143 



Christ. He was sound in faith and or- 
derly in practice, ever exhorting and 
admonishing to practical godliness, to 
love, and to good works. 




stu- 

fair- 

the 



J. C. HURST. 

Hurst, Elder J. C. (M. D.), of Roan- 
oke, Va., and brother of Sana N. Hurst, 
was born September 12, 18G4, in a rur- 
al district of Pulaski County, Va., and 
was the seventh child of Allen and 
Nancy Hurst. He was of a 
dious nature and acquired a 
ly liberal education and at 
age of nineteen began the study 
of medicine and graduated at the 
age of twenty-one years with honor, 
receiving a gold medal for general 
proficiency out of a graduating class 
of several hundred, by the college fac- 
ulty. He was appointed resident phys- 
ician to Maternity Hospital, Baltimore, 
but decilned to accept, preferring ac- 
tive outdoor practice. In his practice, 
in which he was very successful, he 
mingled with various denominations 
among which were some Old School 
Baptists, but he had no love for them, 
and was disposed to ridicule their ex- 
perimental religion. On one occasion 
he heard an Old School Baptist tell his 
experience. He noted down what he 
said and wrote a thesis on it as a form 

of insanity which was published in a 
medical journal. From the medical 
profession he received a number of 
private letters commending his article, 
which to him was well pleasing. But 
God had a work for him to do, and like 

Paul he was made to preach to the 
pec pie he did not love, and contend for 

the experiences that he once pub- 
lished as a species of insanity. After 



deep conviction for sin and a seeking 
of rest under the law he was given a 
sweet hope in Jesus, went before 
Bethel Church one cold day in January, 
1895, asked for a home, was received 
and baptized by Elder Isaac Webb. 
About one year after this he was or- 
dained to the ministry by Elders Webb, 
Lester Wilson, Hurst and Reid and 
baptized two into the fellowship of 
Bethel Church the same day. Elder 
Hurst, though practicing his profession 
to some extent all the time since his 
ordination has served Bethel, Pil- 
grim's Rest, Reid Island and the 
church at Roanoke, where in connec- 
tion with his brother, Sam N. Hurst, 
services are held every Sunday. He is 
both a defender of the doctrine of his 
Lord and Master and a feeder of the 
sheep of His pasture, and his labors 
have been blessed to the comfort 
of many. 



WM R. HURST. 

Hurst, Elder Wm. R., of Georgia, son 
of John and Elizabeth Hurst, was born 
1820 and died 1861, united with the 
Primitive Baptists, at Harris Springs 
Newton County September 1852, and 
was baptized by Elder Isaac Hamby, 
and was soon afterward ordained to 
the eospel ministry. A full sketch of 
his life could not be obtained by the 
editor. 



WM. HUSSEY. 

Hussey, Elder Wm. (1796-1875), of 
South Carolina, convicted of sin when 
about twenty-five years of age; united 
with the church in 1825 and began 
his ministry the following year. He 
was in the division of the Baptists in 
his early ministry and remained firm, 
contending for the doctrine and prac- 
tice of the apostolic church. He died 
in the full triumphs of faith at a ripe 
old age, and the editor regrets that 
a full sketch of his labors could not 
be given. 



RUFUS HUTCHINS. 

Hutchins, Elder Rufus, of West Vir- 
ginia, after a brief illness died 1891, 
at the home of Brother J. H. Boroughs 
of North Carolina, while on a preach- 
ing tour. A sketch of his life 
could not be obtained. Elder P. 
D. Gold, writes in Zion's Land- 
mark, as fellows, relative to him: 
"How sad it seems to us that 



144 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



this gifted young brother should 
so soon be called away. But his work 
is done. How sad too it appears to us 
that he should be called to die away 
from home. But he died in the har- 
ness at his post, and as the Lord, who 
doeth all things well, appointed." 



PETER HUTCHERSON. 

Hutcherson, Elder Peter (1818- 
1899), of Stokes County, N. C, receiv- 
ed a hope in Christ 1865, received in 
the church at Buffalo 1873, licensed to 
preach June, 1874, and ordained to the 
work of the ministry February, 18S9. 
He was faithful to his calling as long 
as he was able to travel, all the time 
having an orderly walk and godly 
conversation, speaking evil of none, 
often saying if he could not speak 
well of a person he had rather not 
speak at all. He was a faithful wit- 
ness for Jesus and died in the full 
triumphs of faith. 




A, D. HUTCHISON. 

Hutchinson, Elder A. D., of Paris, 
Mo., was born in Ralls County, Mo., 
March 17, 1841, and united with Bear 
Creek Church, near Hannibal, in 
April, 1863. He was ordained in July, 
1894, and has since labored as joint 
pastor in some of the churches with 
Elder J. F. Sutton. This brief sketch 
is from the pen of Elder Walter Cash, 
who wrote of this brother in 1896. 



M. H. HUTCHISON. 

Hutchison, Elder M. H. was born in 
Jasper County, Ga., November 1, 1822, 
and died December 31, 1903. He mar- 
ried Mary E. Parker, October 3, 1843, 
joined the Primitive Baptist church 
about 1850, and was a consistent and 
faithful minister. He moved to Co- 
manche, Texas, in 1876, and lived there 
until his death. He was ordained to 
the ministry and preached in Coman- 
che, and surrounding counties for many 
years. 



JOHN L. HYLTON. 

Hylton, Elder John L., of West Vir- 
ginia, was born and raised in Floyd 
County, Va., and professed a hope in 
Christ and joined the church at West 
Fork, Floyd County, Va., in August, 
1865. He was licensed to exercise a 
gift in the ministry in July, 1866, and 
was ordained to the full functions of 
the gospel ministry September, 1867, 
by Elders Thomas L. Roberson, G. L. 
Tuggle, Wilson H. Dodd and Amos- 
Dickerson. After some years he re- 
moved to Franklin County, Va., and 
for several years served churches in 
the bounds of the Pig River Associa- 
tion holding his membership perhaps 
with the church at Minerva. He re- 
moved from there to Montgomery 
County, Va., and then to the state of 
Indiana and finally removed to Mon- 
roe County, W. Va., and joined the 
Indian Creek Church of Indian Creek 
Association by letter, January, 1889, 
where he remained in full fellowship 
and highly esteemed until his depart- 
ure from this life which took place on 
April 10, 1906. Brother Hylton was an 
humble man whose walks was like 
his preaching and work in the ministry, 
sound and orderly. He loved peace, 
sought it and pursued it. He was a 
poor man as to the goods of this life 
but was rich in faith exemplifying 
a faithful humble zeal with holy bold- 
ness. He traveled a great deal and 
preached as he went. Much of the 
time he went on foot as his Master did. 
He shared much of the afflictions of 
this life but he murmured not, thus 
giving us to feel that his were the 
afflictions of the righteous out of all 
of which the Lord delivered. 



WM. HYMAN. 



Hyman, Elder Wm., was a most re- 
markable man for integrity, candor 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



145 



and popularity among ail classes of 
people, and his decease ended the line 
of worthies who had fought the great 
battle with the "Missionaries" and 
gained the victory by creating peace 
in the churches and drawing the line 
distinctly between Old and New 
School Baptist. He opposed to the last 
all men-made schemes intended to 
corrupt the gospel of Christ. He was 
chosen Moderator of the Kehukee 
Association in 1828, and served her 
in that capacity until 1857, with per- 
haps the exception of one year, mak- 
ing a period of nearly thirty years. 
He was remarkably efficient as Mod- 
erator and his parting address was in- 
deed a gem of pathos, wisdom and 
love. After a life of great usefulness 
he died in 1862. It can be truly said 



of him that he fought a good fight 
and kept the faith. 




^ #*» 




WM. HYMAN 



SOLOMAN INMAN. 

In man, Elder Soloman, of Coal- 
mount, Ind.; was born in Martin 
County, Ind., September 21, 1856; 
raised by religious parents who were 
members of Salem Primitive Baptist 
Church; had serious thoughts about 
his- soul's salvation when a boy but 
felt he could, at any time, turn to 
the Lord and be saved. Therefore he 
was not uneasy about himself. But in 
1873 the Lord opened his eyes to see 
his helpless, lost condition. He was 
brought very low, even to the foot- 
stool of mercy. But He who turned 
his eyes to see within and discover 
the corruption there also turned his 
eyes to Christ to see righteousness 
and salvation there. In 1S75 he united 
with Salem Church. It was a season 
or rejoicing, but of short duration. Soon 
the burden of the gospel was pressing 
him down, and after much striving 
against the impression to preach he 
was made willing, was ordained in 
1894, and has since been preaching 
Jesus a complete, and all-sufficient 
Saviour. • 



JAMES IRELAND. 

Ireland, Eider James, was born in 
the city of Edinburg 17'! S. emigrated 
to America and settled in Virginia in 
early life when he was wild, reckless 
and had not the fear of God before his 



eyes. But God who is rich in mercy 
had determined to pluck him as a 
brand from the burning, which He did, 
and made him a bright and shining 
light in His church and used him for 
His glory and the good of His people. 
After deep conviction for sin he was 
led to the Cross for relief, was deliv- 
ered of his burden and soon began to 
publish the good news to others. Hav- 
ing been educated a Presbyterian, he 
was not easily convicted of the obliga- 
tion to be baptized. But when he was 
made to see the emblematic teaching 
of this ordinance and the example of 
Christ in submitting to immersion he 
renounced sprinkling, was baptized 
by Elder Samuel Harris and soon 
ordained to the work of the min- 
istry. He was one of of the pio- 
neer preachers of Virginia, and 
suffered much persecution from 
the established church under the Col- 
onial government; was put in jail in 
Culpepper for preaching the gospel, 
and while thus imp isoned his enemies 
tried to suffocate him by burning brim- 
stone, etc. He states he might speak 
of a hundred instances of cruelty. "I 
expected,' he says in his writings, "at 
every court to be brought out to the 
whipping post before the gazing multi- 
tude; I sat down and counted the cost, 
a'nd believed, through Christ strength- 
ening me, I could suffer all things for 
His sake. It appeared that their pow- 
er did not reach so far or it would have 
been executed. At this period, I receiv- 



146 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ed letters from ministers of our persua- 
sion and from a variety of churches 
with whom I was connected. From 
these churches I received general in- 
formation how singularly, letters I 
wrote, were, under God, blessed to 
the conversion of numbers who were 
anxiously led to inquire into 
the cause for which I suf- 
fered, as well as the grounds of 
that fortitude which bore me up under 
these sufferings. My prison, then, was 
a place in which I enjoyed much of the 
divine presence; a day seldom passed 
without some signal token of the di- 
vine gcodness towards me, which 
generally led me to subscribe my 
letters in these words, " 'From my 
palace in Culpepper.' " As a speci- 
men of the letters written to him 
a few of the closing lines of one 
from Elder David Thomas will not be 
uninteresting: "O brother, if you can, 
by bearing the charming lovely Cross 
of Jesus Christ, win one of the strong- 
est of Satan's strongholds no matter 
then how soon you die, and if you thus 
die for Him, how would the glorious 
armies of the martyrs above shout to 
see Ireland coming from a prison to 
reign with them in glory!" Elder Ire- 
land was the pastor of the Baptist con- 
gregations at Buckmarsh, Happy Creek 
and Water Lick and other churches 



in Frederick and Shenandoah Coun- 
ties, Va. He labored , nearly forty 
years in his Lord's vineyard, and 
during a great part of the time, 
through much infirmity of body. He 
was always distinguished as an able 
minister of the New Testament, right- 
ly dividing the word of truth, giving 
to saint and sinner their portion in due 
season. During his last illness, which 
confined him to his bed about three 
months, his mind was tranquil and 
serene. Fully sensible of his approach- 
ing dissolution, and perfectly resigned 
to the will of God, he endured all 
things, as seeing Him who is invisible; 
and having an eye to the recompense 
of reward, patiently waited for the 
manifestations of the sons of God. He 
died May 5 1806. 



R. J. IVIE. 



Ivie, Elder R. J., of Arkansas, was 
born in Virginia 1826, ccnvicted of sin 
in 1840, received a hope in Christ 
1852, and united with the church at 
Muddy Fork, and was baptized by 
Elder Bowers. He was ordained in 
1885, by Elders J. F. Johnston, H. M. 
Brazil, J. P. Rogers and Z. Wiseman, 
and was a faithful minister. 



J 



J. C. JACKSON. 

Jackson, Elder J. C, of Alabama, 
was born 1820 and died 1898. Reso- 
lutions adopted by his home church, 
Carmel, July 16, 1898, show the high 
esteem in which he was held, and it 
is regretted that a full sketch of his 
life and labors could not be obtained. 
He was a zealous worker in the gos- 
pel vineyard, a good neighbor and 
model citizen. 



JOHN W. JACKSON. 

Jackson, Elder John W., of Edge- 
combe County, N. C, was born July 
10, 1835; lost his parents early in 
life; raised by his grandfather; was 
required to labor hard and had but 
three months schooling; married in 
1856 to Miss Salley A. Jackson; join- 
ed the Southern army and served in 
the Civil war until July, 1864, when 



he returned home wounded, convicted 
of sin and given a sweet hope in 
Jesus about this time and a few years 
later — (November, 1873 — united with 
the Primitive Baptists at Pleasant Hill 
Edgecombe County, and was baptized 
by Elder W. W. Barnes. He was 
soon licensed to preach, and in May, 
1881, was ordained by Elders B. C. 
Pitt and J. D. Scott, and has since 
served his home church as pastor. He 
is in his seventy-fourth year of age, 
has been married fifty-three years, 
which union has been blessed with 
ten children. 



P. H. JAMES. 

James, Elder P. H., of Prescott, 
Ark., is at present Moderator of the 
Ouachita Association and has served 
in this capacity for about twelve 
years He is associate editor of the 
Messenger of Peace, and has, since 
his ordination, served two to four 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



147 



churches. Bern in Arkansas 1850, rear- 
ed by good moral parents, he was 
nearly grown before he bad any seri- 
ous thoughts about his future or eter- 
nal welfare; and when made cognizant 
of his depraved, sinful condition, like 
many other quickened sinners thought 
he could obtain pardon for his sins 
by his own works, or by the law of 
works. But instead of obtaining what 
he sought for he felt to grow worse, 
his burden became heavier and with 
anguish of soul, dark despair seized 
him. But he was not allowed to re- 
main in this condition long. Jesus was 
revealed to him as his Saviour, he - 
united with the church at Fellowship 
in 1879, and was ordained in 18S8 by 
Elders J F. Middlebrooks, L F. Grif- 
fin and W. J. Hull. Faithful in the 
work he is greatly beloved by his 
people. 



JAMES JEFFERSON. 

Jefferson, Elder James, of West Vir- 
ginia. This faithful minister was born 
in Alexandria, Va., in 1792, and died in 
1874, in his eighty-second year of age. 
When nineteen years old he moved to 
West Virginia, fought in the war of ! 
1812; returned home, was married to 
Miss Zeniah Freeland, settled on the 
banks of the Ohio river, the old farm 
still being known as the Jefferson 
homestead. Elder Jefferson was a rel- I 
ative of the famous statesman, Thomas i 
Jefferson. In early manhood he was ; 
convicted of sin and baptized by Elder 
Samuel Kendershat. Some years after 
this he was ordained to the ministerial 
work and was a- firm and fearless advo- 
cate of salvation alone by grace. He 
labored witi* Elders Trott, Beebe and 
other old soldiers of this day, was per- 
sonally acquainted with Alexander 
Campbell and helped oppose him in the 
division of 1827. Elder Jefferson built 
up several churches, preached in school 
houses, court houses and wherever 
opportunity was given; was charitable 
to the poor, a good neighbor and hon- 
ored citizen. 



J. N. JEFFERSON. 

Jefferson, Elder J. N., of Mounds- 
ville, W Va., was born March 4, 1849; 
raised on the farm; given a high 
school education and began teaching 
when twenty-one years of age and fol- 
lowed this for eight years. He united 
with Rock Hill Church in October, 
1889, — which church was founded by 
his grandfather — Elder James Jeffer- 



son, — was baptized by Elder T. N. 
Alderton, began preaching in 1890, 
and ordained in 1893 by Elders T. N. 
Alderton, C. H. Wjaters and D. T. 
Poynter, and has since had the care 
of churches. Elder Jefferson is not 
only a faithful minister but has also 
been a useful citizen. While he is the 
only Old School Baptist in the city, — 




J. N. JEFFERSON 

his home, — and his doctrine is not 
loved, yet he has been five times 
elected on the city council, has served 
twelve years as magistrate and has 
been chosen more than a dozen times 
as administrator, is guardian of sev- 
eral orphans, and though he is up- 
right, honest and truthful he feels he 
deserves no commendations for he 
can say, like Paul, "By the grace of 
God I am what I am." 



LEGGETT JENKINS. 

Jenkins, Elder Leggett. The subject 
of this notice was born April 27, 1825, 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church, 
1853, and soon thereafter began to 
preach; was ordained to the full work 
of the ministry May, 1858, which posi- 
tion he filled with honor to the day of 
his death which occurred at his home 
in Lauderdale County, Ala., November 
15 1896. He was an earnest advocate 
of the truth, sound in the faith of God's 
elect, and boldly declared that eternal 
life is the gift of God, using as his first 
text the words of our Saviour, "My 
sheep hear My voice," etc. He dearly 
loved the Baptist cause, and spent 
about forty years of his life in the min- 
istry, during which time he preached 
a great deal, traveling principally on 



148 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



horseback. He was a plain, humble 
herald of the Cross, ever ready to go 
where duty called; lived an exemplary 
life, both in the church and in his daily 
walk, fulfilling the scriptural injunc- 
tion to "provide things honest in the 
sight cf all men." In the death of 
Brother Jenkins, the church has lost a 
faithful, worthy member and wise 
counsellor; his companion a kind lov- 
ing husband; and his children an in 
dulgent father; and the community a 
useful and honored citizen. 



FRANK JENKINS. 

Jenkins, Elder Frank, was born in 
Culpepper County, Va., July 8, 1815; 
moved with his parents to Kentucky 
when a child, united with the church 
when about nineteen years old and 
was baptized by Elder Whitehead. He 
was soon ordained to the ministerial 
work and during his ministry of about 
sixty years served several churches 
successfully, and was for about four- 
teen years moderator of the Salem 
Association. Possessed of a strong 
mind, his ideas wore clear cut and 
well defined, an able defender of sal- 
vation by grace, a zealous worker in 
his Master's vineyard, he adorned the 
doctrine he professed, and died in the 
full triumphs of that faith March- 5, 
1896, in his eighty-first year of age. 




JOSHUA JENNINGS. 

Jennings, Elder Joshua of Virginia, 
was born in Culpepper County in 1800, 
and when he was about twenty-one 
years of age moved to Rockingham 



County where he made his home until 
death claimed him in 1872. He was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry 
when about thirty years old and for 
forty years was a bold defender of the 
truth, serving churches within the 
bounds of the Ketocton and Ebenezer 
Associations. A full sketch of his life 
and labors could not be obtained by 
the editor. 




R. H. JENNINGS. 



Jennings, Elder R. H., of Dawson, 
Ga., was born December 10, 1867, had 
poor advantages to obtain an edu- 
cation but made use of the few oppor- 
tunities within his reach; felt that 
he could, at any time, turn to the Lord 
"close in with the overtures of mercy 
and be saved," but it pleased God to 
convict him of sin and show him his 
helpless and lost condition, his cry 
being, "Lord, have mercy on me!" 
So cast down was he in this soul 
trouble that he felt he must die and 
be banished from God's presence, and 
made some preparations for death. 
But God delivered him out of this 
condition, revealing Jesus to him 
as his Friend and Redeemer. Before 
uniting with the church, — which he 
delayed in doing on account of a feel- 
ing sense of his unworthiness, but 
which he did in 1885— he felt he 
would have to preach Jesus. He was 
ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry in 1889, and has since been serv- 
ing three to five churches, has bapaiz- 
ed about two hundred persons, married 
,more than three score coupleh, is 
clerk of his home association and is 
an humble preacher relying alone 
upon mercy for salvation. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



149 




J. M. JOHNSON. 

Johnson, Elder J. M. This gifted 
and faithful soldier of Jesus was a 
native of Tennessee. He was horn 
September 6, 1867, and died May 1, 
1908. He received a hope in Jesus in 
his twenty-third year, united with the 
Primitive Baptists the following year 
and preached his first sermon January, 
1899. In his twenty-second year of 
age, his father died and as a dutiful 
son he gave up his own business, re- 
mained at home and provided for a 
widowed mother, seven sisters and one 
brother. As he was devoted and true 
to his father's natural family, so he 
proved to be to the spiritual family 
of his Heavenly Father. He loved the 
church and served it faithfully until 
his death and when in his last illness 
he from time to time composed an 
article for publication in the Primitive 
Baptist, and with a trembling hand 
signed it as his last words to his be- 
loved brethren, saying at the time, 
"If this is not the truth, I am lost; 
but I am not afraid to risk it." In this 
message of this godly man he set 
forth Jesus as the way, the truth and 
the life, the only and all sufficient 
Saviour who completely saves all his 
people without the loss of one; and 
sweetly exhorts the dear children of 
God, the believer in J'esns, to follow 
Him and slow their faith by their 
works and thus reap the blessings of 
obedience. Elder Johnson was a strong 
preacher, a good neighbor, and a faith- 
ful laborer in his Master's vineyard. 



in Washington County, Ga., June 8, 
1812, and moved to Gadsden County, 
Fla., 1821. In 1828 he moved to Irwin 
(now Brooks) County, Ga., where he 
lived until his death. He was brought 
to a knowledge of the truth and re- 
ceived into the fellowship of Bethle- 
hem Church, July, 1805. He had not 
been with the church long until they 
saw the gift of a deacon in him, and 
in June, 1851, he was ordained as dea- 
con. He served the church faithfully 
for seventeen years, and it was shown 
that his Master required his services 
as pastor. In 1872 he was called to the 
care of Mt. Olive Church, Madison 
County, Fla., and was ordained in 
September to the full functions of 
the gospel, by Elders Crawford Tuck- 
er and H. G. Fuller. He was called to 
the care of his home church 1875, 
which charge he kept until the day 
of his death. He was faithful to his 
charge; he was gentle, loving, and 
kindly affectionate towards his breth- 
ren, and it can never be said that a 
charge was brought against him by 
his church; never once did he dis- 
grace the profession, as many have 
done, but was ever found at his post 
contending against ungodliness and 
disorder in the church. He kept the 
faitn, he fought a good fight, and 
when his hour came to depart, he 
went to sleep without a groan, or 
shudder, or anything to indicate suf- 
fering. 0, blessed sleep! Discharged 
from pain and labor, from warfare 
and hardships, to meet a sure reward 
for all the redeemed of God; a clear 
record left behind and honorably 
discharged. "Blessed are the dead 
who die in the Lord." His kind words", 
his godly admonition, and his pious 
walk, will live yet many days with 
those who were blessed to know hi.m 



WILSON JOHNSON. 

Johnson, Elder Wilson, of Brooks 
County, Ga., was called from his la- 
bors, December 17, 1893. He was born 



JORDAN W. JOHNSON. 



Johnson, Elder Jordan W., of Whit- 
akers, Edgecombe County, X. C , son 
of Aaron and Winnifred Johnson, nee 
Walker, was born May 30, 1833. His 
father made no profession, his moth- 
er was a Primitive Baptist, and tried 
to bring him up right. But he grew up 
wild, and thoughtless, caring only for 
the pleasures and attainments of this 
world. He was exceedingly anxious 
to become a good musician and to be 
rich. But God ordered otherwise for 
him. He was convicted of sin, felt he 
would soon be banished into an eter- 
nal hell for his sins, and some thought 
he w ould lose his mind. But God de- 



150 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



livered him. Jesus was revealed in 
him the hope of glory, he was made 
to hate things he once loved and love 
the things he, in early life, cared 
nothing for. The church appeared 
beautiful and he was constrained by 




JORDAN W. JOHNSON 

the love of God to walk under the 
blood-stained banner of King Emman- 
uel, and was baptized by Elder John 
Stamper. He was soon impressed with 
the duty of preaching Jesus, the 
church saw the gift and licensed him 
in 18G4, and in 1871 he was ordained 
to the full work of the ministry by 
Elders R. D. Hart and John Stamper. 
Elder Johnson was soon called to the 
care of his home church — Williams, — 
and afterward Deep Creek and Rocky 
Swamp. He is now — 1908 — seventyfive 
years old, has baptized many, married 
two hundred and sixty-eight couples, 
worked hard as a farmer, and for 
forty years has been a faithful soldier 
of Jesus, preaching but one Lord, one 
faith and one baptism, and looking 
above to Him as his only hope for 
time and eternity. 



ELK JOHNSON. 

Johnson, Elder Elk, of San Antonia, 
Texas was born in 1838, united with 
Beulah Primitive Baptist Church 
in his twenty-third year and was 
baptized by Elder William Hub- 
bard. He attended college in Ma- 
con, Ga., graduating with honors, 
entered the war between the 
states, serving as lieutenant, then pro- 
moted to captain, and later to major. 
On his return from the war he served 
as clerk of the court of Moultrie 



County and Colquitt County, Ga. Soon 
after he united with the church he was 
impressed with the duty of preaching 
a crucified Saviour as the salvation 
of sinners, but fought against this im- 
pression and offered many excuses. 
But he was made to realize with the 
Apostle Paul, "Woe is me if I preach 
not the gospel," and he was set apart 
by his church to preach wherever God 
in His providence called him. He has 
traveled and preached in many states, 
and finally settled in Texas. He as- 
sisted in the organization of San Ja- 
cinto Primitive Baptist Association in 
October, 1873. Later he moved to 
Southwest Texas, locating at San An- 




ELK JOHNSON 

tonia and was one of the pioneer 
Primitive Baptist preachers in this 
section. His many vicissitudes in bus- 
iness, as a merchant, farmer and car- 
penter has led him in many localities 
where the gospel was never heard, 
and upon all suitable occasions he has 
endeavored to hold up the blood stain- 
ed banner of Jesus. In this work he 
has, like Paul, not built on another's 
foundation, but seemed to prefer to 
go "into regions beyond," to preach in 
destitute places. 



R. W. JOHNSON. 

Johnson, Eider R. W., of Missouri, 
born in Gibson County, Ind„ 1845, ex- 
perienced a hope in Jesus when about 
eighteen years of age, united with Big 
Creek Church two years later, was, a 
few years after this licensed, and after- 
ward ordained to the full work of the 
gospel ministry. He was a deep in- 
vestigator, good conversationalist and 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



151 



an able writer. His writings on the 
resurrection were considered very 
able indeed. At the age of fifty-five 
his strong mind broke down and he 
died in the state asylum at Fulton, 
Mo. 



S. C. JOHNSON. 



Johnson, Elder S. C. (1804-1892), of 
Lowndes County, Miss., was a faithful 
devoted and useful minister and 
served the church at Sulphur Spring, 
Monroe County, Miss., and other 
churches also for a long term of years. 
He was an able teacher, not only by 
word, but by example, adorning the 
doctrine he preached with a godly 
walk and conversation. Bold and zeal- 
ous in the cause of his Master, yet 
humble and sympathetic as a child, 
his influence was for good in and out 
of the pulpit. The editor regrets that 
a full sketch of his life could not be 
obtained. 




J. C. JONES. 



Jones, Elder J. C, of Missouri, was 
born in Illinois, November 26, 1864. 
Early in life he was tormented with 
the thought that he was a sinner in 
the sight of God, and as such could 
never see His face in peace, and only 
after many years of gloom and an- 
guish of soul, this feeling of con- 
demnation and guilt gradually passed 
away and he found himself hoping 
in the mercy of God, through the 
merits of a crucified Redeemer. He 
united with Rock Creek Church in 
1894 and was baptized by Elder R. A. 



Oliphant. Two years later he was or- 
dained to the full work of the minis- 
try, and has since been serving from 
two to four churches and is a faithful 
self-sacrificing servant of his Master. 
Elder Jones is the beloved modtrator 
of the Nodaway Association of Prim- 
itive Baptists and is highly esteemed 
among his people. 



ARCHIBALD JONES. 

Jones, Elder Archibald, of North 
Carolina, was born in the county of 
Beaufort, August 9, 1803, and died 
June 13, 1884. He united with 
Blount's Creek Church in 1849 and 
was soon ordained as deacon and 
served four years in this capacity 
when he was ordained to the gospel 
work and until the end of his life was 
an able, willing and faithful pastor. 
He was sound in doctrine and prac- 
tice and led an exemplary life in ac- 
cord with the doctrine he preached. 
Was twice married, first to Miss To- 
litha Orrell who bore him eight chil- 
dren. After her death in 1874 he was 
married to Mrs. Lavina t Warren) 
Evitt. He passed away fully trusting 
Him whom he had preached to others. 



S. B. JONES. 

Jones, Elder S. B., of Piano, Iowa, 
was born in Putnam County Indiana, 
September 1, 1828,- and moving to 
Appanoose County, Iowa, united with 
Providence Church on the third Satur- 
day in November, 1870. He was or- 
dained to the ministry in May, 1S78, 
and has preached Jesus as a full and 
complete Saviour. He was Moderator 
of Hazel Creek Association for over 
twenty years, but full particulars ef 
his useful labors and exemplary life 
could not be obained. 



W. L. JONES. 

Jones, Elder W. L., of Loveland, 
Iowa. This faithful and zealous min- 
ister was born in Putnam County, Ind., 
August 25, 1830. In his nineteenth year 
he received a hope in the Saviour, 
united with Council Bluffs Church. 
Pottawattamie County, Iowa, in 1864, 
was ordained to the ministry April 7, 
1866, and for more than thirty years 
was a faithful pastor of churches. He 
also served as moderator of the Mis- 



152 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



souri Valley Association and was a 
lover of peace in the churches and 
earnestly labored to that end. It is 




W. L. JONES 



regretted that recent information of 
Elder Jones could not be obtained. 




W. M. JONES. 

Jones, Elder W. M., of Missouri 
Valley, Iowa, was born in Green 
County, Ind., in 1852, given a hope in 
the Saviour and united with the Prim- 
itive Baptists at Council Bluffs in 
188G, and in 1907 the church licensed 
him to preach wherever God in His 
providence may cast his lot. Elder 
Jones loves the truth as it is in 
Jesus and desires to faithfully wit- 
ness for Him. 




ISAAC JONES. 

Jones, Elder Isaac, of Maple Hill, 
North Carolina. This gifted minister 
who is now serving seven churches, 
and has for many years served as 
Moderator of the White Oak Associa- 
tion, was born February 17, 1847, join- 
ed the Southern army — Co. L, C7th 
N. C, Regiment, — in his seventeenth 
year; convicted of sin when about 
twenty-one years of age and for three 
years was in great darkness and 
trouble. In 1870 he was given a hope 
in Jesus, united with Cold Cypress 
Creek Church and was baptized by 
Elder A. Davis; on the following day 
he was impressed with the duty of 
preaching Jesus to others. Another 
three years passed amid much trial; 
for he felt he had none of the spirit- 
ual qualifications of a gospel minis- 
ter, and having no education, — preach- 
ing seemed an impossibility. At that 
time he could not write his name, but 
God became mouth and wisdom to 
him, he was soon ordained, has grown 
in grace and knowledge, and is an 
able speaker and bold defender of 1 the 
doctrine of God our Saviour. Elder 
Jones, in early life was reckless, 
wicked and intemperate, and feels to 
be, indeed, a miracle of grace. He is 
zealous in the cause of truth and 
highly esteemed among his brethren. 
Has been married three times, is in 
his sixty-third year of age and desires 
to keep the faith and finish his course 
with joy. i 

J. A. T. JONES. 



Jones, Elder J. A. T., of McCullers, 
N. C. This useful and faithful minister 
is the pastor of Middle Creek, Salem, 
Smithfield and Willow Springs 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



153 



Churches. He is also clerk of the 
Little River Primitive Baptist Associa- 
tion and is highly esteemed among 
Baptists wherever known. 



J. T. JORDAN. 

Jordan, Elder J. T., of Lilburn, Ga., 
This able and useful minister is the 
beloved Moderator of the Yellow 
River Primitive Baptist Association 
of Georgia, and the faithful pastor of 
the following churches of said Associa- 
tion: Harris Springs, Sweet Water, 
Camp Creek and Fellowship. It is with 
regret that a suitable sketch of his 
life and labors could not appear. 



BENJAMIN M. JOWERS. 

Jowers, Elder Benjamin M.„ of Cen- 
tral, Elmore County, Ala., oldest son 
of Elder Benjamin Jowers by his last 
wife was born in Carroll County, Ga., 
February 1G, 1851, raised by Christian 
parents who taught him the way he 
should go, but could not make him 
love that way. Early in life he moved, 
with his parents, to Alabama, and be- 
came a leader of rowdy, mischievous 
boys. But God arrested him in his 
wild career. At nineteen he was 
blessed with a quiet, steady girl as 
life companion, and when about twen- 
ty years of age was convicted of sin. 
For sixteen years he was marching in 
the wilderness and laboring under the 
law, but in September, 1887, he was 
blessed with sweet deliverance in 
Jesus. At the same time he was also 
impressed with the duty of preaching 
and because of this impression, and 
feeling he could not preach, he re- 
mained out of the church for eight 
years. But his love for the church was 
so great he went forward, joined 
Bethel Church, December 1895, and 
determined he would live as a mem- 
ber without preaching. His church 
saw his gift and also saw his rebellion, 
and when they granted him licenses 
he arose in conference determined he 
would object but could not speak. 
Then and there he was made willing. 
He was, in 1904, ordained to the full 
ministerial work by Elders H. G. 



Harris, R. B. Smith, J. R. Mauk, J. P. 
Nobles and J. A. Nix. During his min- 
istry he has traveled about 2,500 miles 
a year in his buggy in the gospel ser- 
vice, has met eighty or more Old 
School Baptist ministers and is zeal- 
ous in the cause of truth and finds 
peace in performance of duty. 



BENJAMIN JOWERS. 

Jowers, Elder Benjamin, of Alabama 
This eminent minister was born in 
South Carolina, September 4, 1806, 
united with the Baptists before the 
great division, 1827-32 and in this sad 
war stood firm for Bible doctrine and 
practice and ever afterwards re- 
mained with the Old School brethren. 
He was licensed to preach in 1840 and 
ordained at Shiloh Church. Randolph 
(now Clay) County, Ala., in 1842 by 
Elders Richard Gaudier, Wm. Morri- 
son and John Duke, and for forty 
eight years was actively engaged in 
the service of churches. He served 
as Moderator of Wetumpka Associa- 
tion fifteen years and was highly es- 
teemed wherever known. He was 
married three times and had nineteen 
children born to him — three by his 
first wife, nine by his second and 
seven by his third, was a remarkable 
man, a good husband, father and 
neighbor, well established in the doc- 
trine of salvation by grace, and died 
in the triumphs of faith, June 23, 1890. 

JOSEPH J. JOYCE. 

Joyce, Elder Joseph J., was the son 
of Alex and Mary Joyce, was born in 
Henry County, Va., September 26, 
1852, and was married to Sarah E. 
Vernon, November 3, 1870. Unto this 
union were born five sons and eight 
daughters. He united with the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church by experience at 
Buffalo, in 1S70. Was baptized by 
Elder Robert Hill and began preaching 
in a short time. He was a great fav- 
orite of the brethren and friends, and 
his preaching was much appreciated 
by all who knew him. While he did 
not travel far from home he made 
many sacrifices for the cause of truth. 



K 



MARTIN KAUFFMAN. 

Kauffman, Elder Martin, of Virginia, 
This minister lived in the latter part 
of the seventeenth and the early years 
of the eighteenth century, was bap- 



tized by Elder John Koontz and trav- 
eled much with that eminent servant 
of God. It was on one of these preach- 
ing tours that Elder Kauffman was 
mistaken for Elder Koontz by a ruffian 
who had been instigated by others to 



154 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



such methods of persecution, and 
was severely beaten. The two were 
stopping at a brother's home one night 
in the Shenandoah Valley near Mill 
Creek Church now Page County, and 
were preparing to hold service when 
Elder Koontz heard inquiry being 
made for him, and suspecting mischief, 
stepped in an adjoining room, leaving 
Kauffman to meet the stranger. It was 
some time before Elder Kauffman 
could convince the barbarian that his 
name was not Koontz. There are many 
descendants of Elder Kauffman living 
in Page County. 



CALAWAY KECK. 

Keck, Elder Calaway of Walnut 
Hill, Va , was born March 2, 1861, in 
Union County, Tenn., obtained a hope 
in Jesus in his sixteenth year but lived 
out of church for six years, when he 
united with Big Barren Church and 
was baptized by Elder Henry Ausmus. 
He was ordained in 1897 and after 
serving churches several years in his 
native state, moved to West Virginia, 
and is now living in the bounds of 
Powells Valley Association. 




FREDERICK W. KEENE. 

Keene, Elder Frederick W. The sub- 
ject of this notice was born in London, 
England, March 28, 1S56, moved with 
his parents to Montreal, Canada, in 
his fourteenth year, united with the 
New School Baptists in 1873 and be- 
gan preaching for them in 1875. But 
becoming dissatisfied with their doc- 
trine and practices he publicly with- 



drew in 1880 and in February, 1881, 
united with the Old School Baptists, 
was baptized by Elder Wm. L. Bebee, 
soon ordained and has been serving 
churches since. His home is in North 
Berwick, Me. He is a gifted preacher, 
a fluent writer and greatly beloved for 
the truth's sake. In regard to his 
christian experience he writes as fol- 
lows, "During my boyhood days I 
lived and walked in the lusts of the 
flesh and shrank from nothing to grat- 
ify my carnal appetite. But God ar- 
rested my wild career. On the first 
Sunday in April, 1871 I sat in a New 
School Baptist Church in the city of 
Montreal and the preacher gave out 
his text, 'Boast not thyse^ of tomor- 
row, for thou knowest not what a day 
may bring forth.' Instantly my soul 
was stricken, and all my vile anticipa- 
tions were blasted, and the terrors of 
the Almighty made me afraid. What 
the preacher said in his sermon I 
have not the slightest remembrance of. 
I was a vile condemned sinner before 
the LOrd. My sins revived, they 
stared me in the face and I felt myself 
a fit subject for the damnation of hell. 
I feared that the awful curse of God 
would be poured forth upon me 
and perhaps before tomorrow. 
I shall die, and I shall go 
to hell, God will say to me, 'de- 
part ye cursed into everlasting fire, 
prepared for the devil, and his angels." 
My trouble over my sins continued 
and increased and I could see no 
ground for hope that there could be 
mercy for one so wicked as I. I be- 
gan to loathe my sins, to sigh and 
mourn over my vileness, but no relief 
could I find. Again I attended preach- 
ing, and the minister announced his 
text 'God is love.' I felt, 'Can it be so?' 
A little ray of hope shone in, and I 
wished it might be so. But in a mom- 
ent all was dashed away, for I felt, if 
it be true, it could not be God loved 
me, and I sank yet lower in despair. 
But the Holy Spirit's still small voice- 
said to my sin stricken heart, 'God is: 
love,' Then indeed my heart was. 
broken, and melted in sorrow before 
the Lord, and with a contrite spirit, I" 
prayed for mercy, prayed for sal- 
vation, but the way of salvation 
fpr a sinner like me I could not 
see. Indeed. I thought I was add- 
ing to my guilt to think there could be 
pardon for such a sinner. Night came 
and I retired to my room imploring 
mercy, every moment I felt the Lord 
must soon come, or I must perish.. 
While thus crying to the Almighty 
God, there came before me a vision of 
Jesus on the cross, and a voice said in 
my soul, 'Salvation is in my dear Son."- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



155 



This was a gracious revelation, and 
while I was wrapped up with this 
sight, my heart went forth with all 
desire to Jesus that I might know He 
was mine, that He died for me. Then 
I thought He looked upon me, so pity- 
ingly and said, 'Look unto me.' O my 
heart with all entreaty looked to him, 
and he looked upon me, and said, 'I 
suffered for thee.' Immediately my 
burden was gcr.j and sweet joy and 
peace flowed iuto my soul. I wept 
and cried aloud for joy. This was the 
beginning of my hope of salvation in 
Christ, the Lamb of God. To write all 
the experiences of my soul from that 
sweet day till now would fill volumes. 
I was led by the Lord soon after this 
into the knowledge of the glorious 
doctrine of God our Saviour." Elder 
Keene is a faithful pastor and his 
labors have been blessed with abund- 
ant fruit. ■ 

E. M. KEENEY. 

Keencty, Elder E. M. was born De- 
cember IS, 1862, joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church near Monroe in Jasper 
County. Iowa, when twenty-four years 
of age and was ordained to the work 
of the ministry at Council Bluffs 
Church, Loveland, Iowa, May 13, 1905. 
The editor was unable to obtain a full 
sketch of Elder Keeney's life and lab- 
ors. 




R, L. KEETON. 

Keeton, Elder R. L., of Kellogg, 
Iowa, was born in Kentucky, March 
20, 1S69, moved with his mother to 
Iowa when four years old, his father 
having died when he was one year 
old. He united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Grinnell, Iowa, 



January, 1901, and was baptized by 
Elder R. A. Oliphant. He was soon 
impressed with the duty of preaching 
the gospel of Christ and was ordain- 
ed November, 1907. He has the care 
of churches and proves by his life 
that he loves the cause of Jesus. 



JOHN KELLY. 

Kelly, Elder John, of Tennessee, 
was one of the old, faithful preachers 
before the division with the New School 
Baptist. He was one of the presbytery 
in the constitution of Union Church, 
now known as Sweeten's Cove Church, 
Marion County, Tenn., and was its 
first pastor. He died at his post many 
years ago, and the editor regrets that 
data for a full sketch of Elder Keily's 
life and labcrs could not be obtained. 



J. W. KELLY. 

Kelly, Elder J. W., of Gellwood, Flu., 
was born May 11, 1833, received a 
hope in Jesus in his fourteenth year, 
united with the Primitive Baptists at 
Baker Creek Church, Indiana, 1861, 
was ordained at Orange Church, Fla., 
1S92, and after a few years of labor 
in the Master's vineyard fell asleep 
June 19,. 1901 For the last few years 
of his life he was a great sufferer 
from cancer, yet never murmured nor 
complained and died in the full tri- 
umphs of faith. 




ELLIS KELLY. 

Kelly, Elder Ellis, of Kentucky, was 
born February 22, 1829, in Grayson 
County, Ky., and died October 2, 1904. 



156 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



He united with the Baptists at Pine 
Knob Church in Grayson County, June, 
1879, and was, by the same church, 
ordained May 28, 1887. Elder Kelly., 
while not highly educated was above 
the average in intelligence, was a man 
of good judgment and an able reason- 
er. When convinced of a correct posi- 
tion he was unyielding. The doctrine 
of predestination and election, that 
God's people were chosen in Christ 
before the world was and would all 
eventually be saved without the loss of 
one, were sweet themes to him. Be- 
fore his death he realized he must 
soon die, and told his loved ones he 
was not afraid to meet death, and 
gently fell asleep in Jesus. 



GEO. W. KELLY. 

Kelly, Elder Geo. W. This gifted man 
was born in North Carolina, 1794 and 
died at his home in Floyd County, Va., 
1878. He united with Clear Springs 
Church in 1819, and was baptized by 
Elder John Wilson, was ordained in 
1833, served churches until his death 
and was for many years Moderator of 
Pig River 'Association. During his 
ministry he baptized many persons and 
married over eight hundred couples. 
Probably no man of the nineteenth 
century ever stood more firm in the 
doctrine of salvation by grace. He 
had no fellowship for the new-fangled 
schemes introduced among the Bap- 
tists in the present century; but when 
these peace and union dividing here- 
sies were troubling the church, he 
stood firm as a rock, and when the 
time had fully come for the church to 
declare non-fellowship with the un- 
scriptural and God dishonoring 
schemes of man's devising he stood 
firm. Elder Kelly stood on the old 
platform and never swerved to the 
right or left. The golden bait of popu- 
larity had no charms for him. His 
Master's honor and glory were upper- 
most in his mind and next to it was the 
union of the churches. The slanderer's 
tongue nor the scorner's frowns did 
not stop him for a moment. He gloried 
not save in the cross of Jesus Christ. 
The latter part of his ministry seemed 
to be the brightest. The remark was 
often made by professor and non-prof- 
essor that as he advanced in years he 
also advanced in the work of the min- 
istry. He was partially blind for a 
number of years before his death, a 
portion of the time nearly entirely so 
but with a guide he still went on and 
preached the glorious gospel until his 
final discharge came. 




H. C. KER. 

Ker, Elder H. C., of Middletown, N. 
Y., was born in Quantico, Wicomico 
County, Maryland, December 1, 1860. 
His parents were New School Bap- 
tists, his father being an ordained min- 
ister of that denomination. He was 
educated in" the public schools of his 
native county. At home he was taught 
the religion of nis parents, who were 
good, kind and fatihful. When thir- 
teen years old, the New School Bap- 
tists held a protracted meeting in his 
town when he with several others, 
united with them by baptism, and 
verily thought they were the church of 
Gcd. In 1890, his mind became ex- 
ercised regarding the Bible and spirit- 
ual things. Such an experience he had 
never had before. He began to visit 
all denominations in reach, hoping 
to find somewhere that which would 
give the conscience ease and rest. 
He found none who preached what he 
thought the Bible taught; none ex- 
pressed themselves as he felt, until 
at last he found companionship among 
the Old School Baptists, and was re- 
ceived into the fellowship of Little 
Creek Church, Sussex County, Del., 
May, 1894, and was baptized by Elder 
A. B. Francis. He felt from the day 
of his baptism that he must declare 
what God had done for poor sinners. 
In June, 1896, he was licensed and in 
November, 1897 was ordained to the 
full work of the gospel ministry by 
Elders A. B. Francis, E. Rittenhouse, 
S. H. Durand, T. M. Poulson and W. W. 
Meredith. Elder Ker has served Black 
Rock Church, Baltimore County, Md , 
and the Middletown and New Vernon 
churches, located in Orange County, 
N. Y. and the church at Woonbine, 
Mass. He is also associate editor of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



157 



"The Signs of the Times," is modera- 
tor of the Warwick Old School Bap- 
tist Association, is a gifted writer and 
preacher and much beloved b> his 
churches. ■ — 




S. KETCHUM. 



Ketchum, Elder S., of McDonough 
County, 111. The following information 
of Elder Ketchum is found in Elder 
Walter Cash's book published 1890; 
"He was born in Crawford County, 
O., January 7, 1840, and united with 
Barren Grove Church in Henry Coun- 
ty, August 1, 1870. He was ordained 
the second Sunday in June, 1873, and 
has since then served as pastor of 
churches, having charge of two 
churches at this time, which esteem 
him very highly." The editor regrets 
that later information could not be 
obtained. — ■ 

CHRISTOPHER KEYSER. 



Keyser, Elder Christopher, of Vir- 
ginia, was a native of Page County, 
and was pastor at Hawk's Bill, 
Smith's Creek, and other churches in 
the Shenandoah Valley. He was con- 
sidered a sound minister in doctrine 
and practice and opposed all new de- 
partures from the plain, simple teach- 
ing of the Scripture and practice of 



the apostles, — was highly esteemed 
and faithful in the cause of truth. He 
died about the year 1855, and the ed- 
itor regrets that for lack of 1 informa- 
tion a more detailed sketch of his life 
and labors could not appear. 



F. D. L. KOEN. 

Koen, Elder F. D. L. was born July 
3,1815; joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church in 1838, was ordained to the 
ministry in 1856 died at the home of 
his son, Elder A. P. Koen, March 18, 
1908, in his ninety-third year. He had 
been a member of the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church about seventy years, and 
was held in high esteem by all who 
knew him. 



JOHN KOONTZ. 

Koontz, Elder John. This eminent 
servant of God was of German birth, 
and labored among the Baptists of 
Rockingham, which then included 
Page, Culpepper, Frederick and adja- 
cent Counties. In the present county 
of Page there are many descendants 
of Elder Koontz. He was baptized in 
1768, ordained in 1776, was in the 
constitution of Whitehouse (now 
Mill Creek) Church in 1772, and served 
during his forty years of ministerial 
life many churches in the mountainous 
part of the state and in the Shenan- 
doah Valley, among them Mill .Creek, 
Lost River and Brocks Gap. Elder 
Koontz was one of the pioneer preach- 
ers of the Shenandoah Valley and suf- 
fered much persecution for Christ's 
sake. But being called, qualified and 
sustained by the hand of heaven and 
earth he remained firm, faithful and 
unshaken in the apostle's doctrine, 
boldly defending salvation by grace, 
and earnestly exhorting God's believ- 
ing children to walk in the ordinances 
of the Lord's house. He died in 1832, 
between ninety and a hundred years 
of age, and was buried in the Shuler- 
Koontz burying grounds, located on 
+he north side of the Shenandoah 
River, Page County, on the present 
home place of Deacon A. Jackson 
Shuler. His grave is marked with a 
simple, rough slate-rock slab, with 
these words: "John Koontz, died 
1832." 



158 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



SAMUEL J. LACKEY. 

Lackey, Elder Samuel J., who in the 
latter part of his life, moved from 
Virginia to Colorado and died there 
October 4, 1884, was born in Patrick 
County, Va., May 10, 1816, united with 
Liberty Old School Baptist Church in 
1834, baptized by Elder John Conner, 
married to Miss Drucilla Coon, 1834, 
began preaching in 1847, and was or- 
dained in 184S by Elders John Con- 
ner, Nathaniel Thompson, Joshua 
Adams and William Law son. He was 
considered a very able and gifted min 
ister and highly esteemed by his 
brethren, contended earnestly and 
faithfully for the faith that was once 
delivered unto the saints, served as 
pastor of Granam's, State Line, and 
Liberty churches and died in the full 
triumph of faith in the sixty-eighth 
year of his age. , 



D. J. LAMB. 

Lamb, Elder D. J. was born Novem- 
ber % 1824, in Emanuel County, Ga., 
and died October 20, 1901. He united 
with Canooche Church by letter from 
Bethesda Church, Jefferson County, 
Ga., March 6, 1869. He, however, had 
served Canooche Church since 1861, 
and continued to serve it and other 
churches as a faithful pastor for many 
years. A more faithful man and more 
devoted to his calling would be diffi- 
cult to find. He went and preached 
Jesus to the people as long as his phy- 
sical strength would admit it. He was 
married twice, and his second wife, a 
dear sister in Christ and several chil- 
dren, survive him. A short time be- 
fore his death he called his dear wife 
and children around him and told them 
that he was passing away from death 
into life, and spoke encouragingly to 
them, and endeavored to impress it 
upon their minds that there is a living 
God, and prayed to the Lord that the 
next breath might be the last though 
it was about one week afterward be- 
fore the final end, when we verily be- 
lieve he really did pass out of death, 
as he said, into eternal life. He died 
in the full triumphs of faith, trying 
to impress upon others the reality of 
the Christian religion that he had so 
lcng endeavored to live and preach. 




BENJAMIN LAMPTON. 

Lampton, Elder Benjamin. This em- 
inent minister was set for the defense 
of the gospel, and was, perhaps, in 
his day, the most able debater and 
used the greatest array of Scripture 
in argument, of any minister among 
our people. "Manuscripts of Elder 
Lampton," the title of a book pub- 
lished by Elder W. A. Chastain, is the 
most wonderful array of Scripture 
quotations bearing on the subjects 
discussed in a few of his debates, and 
is profitable reading for all seekers 
after truth. Elder Lampton was born 
in Kentucky, May 10, 1825, united 
with Crews Creek Church, in Ken- 
tucky, in his twenty-sixth year, com- 
menced preaching when thirty, mar- 
ried to Miss Elizabeth Baker in 1848, 
and to his second wife, Miss Emma 
Brumback in 1S87, was a first cousin 
of "Mark Twain," whose right name 
is Samuel Lampton Clemmons, and in 
his field of labor was as much" noted 
for quick wit as the famous "Mark." He 
was the youngest of three sons, lost 
his father when four years old, raised 
to manhood by a widowed mother 
with limited opportunities for an edu- 
cation and in turn cared for her in 
his home until her death at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty, was the pastor 
of five churches in Kentucky and 
Ohio, first visited Virginia in 1SS6, 
and such a revival of religion among 
the churches in the Valley that fol- 
lowed will long be remembered, was 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



159 



B. L. LANDERS. 



Landers, Elder B. L., was born in 
Gwinnet County, Ga ., on August 23, 
1828, and died at his home near Em- 
met, Ark., on 'March 1, 1905. He was 
given a good hope through grace in 
his early manhood, united with the 
church and on July 29, 1871, was 
ordained to the full functions of the 
gospel ministry by a presbytery con- 
sisting of Elders T. J. Foster and D. 
B. Almond at Ephesus Church in 
Nevada County, Ark., of which he 
was a member and which he served 
continuously and faithfully until his 
death. His uprightness, and integrity 
as a citizen, and exemplary and faith- 
ful life as a minister gained for him 
the esteem and respect of his fellow- 
man, and the confidence and sincere 



soon called to the pastoral care of 
Naked Creek, Hawk's Bill and Alma 
churches which he served until his 
death September 4, 1890. His labors 
were greatly blessed, and he was very 
successful in persuading God's chil- 
dren to do their duty, baptized over 
two hundred people during his four 
years' service in Virginia, and hun- 
dreds in Kentucky and Ohio. His visit 
to Virginia seemed to be providential; 
he coming just as Elder E. H. Burnam 
began to introduce his Arminian doc- 
trine and practices among the 
churches, and because he would not 
follow Elder B. he was accused of 
creating the trouble. He remained 
firm, steadfast and immovable from 
the dcctrine and practice of the Apos- 
tolic church and on his deathbed 
said: "I am now ready to be offered, 
and the time of my departure is at 
hand. I have fought a good fight, I 
have finished my course, I have kept 
the faith. And I want the world to 
know that I have died in the faith I 
have lived in." He rejoiced that "he 
had a better home prepared in heaven 
for him than he could have on earth.' 
His only sorrow was at parting with 
his devoted wife, and daughter, Mary, 
but he assured them, "The Lord will 
provide." A short time before he 
breathed his last fleeting breath, he [ 
feebly raised his hand, pointing 
heavenward with his finger, and j 
whispered, "All is well.' Not the | 
twitch of a muscle, not one struggle 
disturbed this dying hour, but he 
breathed his life out sweetly, and 
yielded his spirit to the God who gave 
it. Thus died this righteous man. O, 
may our death be like this." 



love of the church. He was deep and 
profound in thought yet his gift was 
such as was adapted to the comfort 
of babes in Christ as well as to the 
comfort and edification of those, who 
are of "full age." He was widely 
known, and served several churches 
faithfully, and acceptably; having to 
ride long distances horseback to 
serve them. While sick he expressed 
no fears or horrors of death, but de- 
sired "to depart and be with Christ." 
His only regret was to leave his dear 
companion. 



WM. CUNNINGHAM LAUCK. 



Lauck, Elder Wm. Cunningham, of 
Virginia was born in Winchester, 
March 24, 1805. His parents, Peter 
and Emily Lauck were of Lutheran 
persuasion and Elder Lauck was 
christened and catechised into this 
creed. In 1830 he was married to Miss 
Eliza J. Sowers, daughter of Col. James 
Sowers of Clark County, Va., a lady of 
fine intellect and forceful character. 
His education was in harmony with his 
environment, was proficient in math- 
ematics and English and well advanced 
in Latin and Greek. He moved to 
Page County, Va., in 1830 and engaged 
in the mercantile business, was soon 
elected clerk of the county and served 
as such for seventeen years, giving it 
up to devote his entire time to the min- 
istry. His life of piety began when 
quite young and it was on the ball 
room flour that the Lord sent the ar- 
row of convicticn to his soul. In Page 
County he heard, for the first time an 
Old School Baptist sermon by Elder 
A. C. Booton, and on seeing the ordi- 
nance of baptism by immersion ad- 
ministered, was so much impressed 
with the power of its truth and exam- 
ple of loyalty that he, with his wife, 
united with Mt. Carmel Church in 
Luray and were baptized by the pas- 
tor, Elder A. C. Booton. At the first 
regular meeting afterward, the pastor 
being absent, he was called upon to 
conduct the service which he did and 
his gift being so manifested that he 
was soon licensed, and in 1835, he was 
ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry. Thus he put on the armor of 
God when the Baptist Church was be- 
ing torn asunder by the leaven of Ar- 
minianism that had for more than a 
quarter of a century been working in 
the denomination. This alluring tide 
of religion that swept so many minis- 
ters into the popular current could 
not move him. He chose rather to suf- 
fer affliction with the people of God 



160 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for 
a season. Elder Lauck was one of the 
most able ministers of the New Testa- 
ment in his day. His manner was im- 
pressive, his language chaste, flowery 
and devotional. In his early ministry 
he served Thum Run, Gourdine Chest- 
nut Fork, Roberson River and Battle 
Run. Later on he gave up the most 
distant ones and his last clays served 
Hawk's Bill and Big Spring, but re- 
tained Roberson River and Battle Run I 
for forty years, faithfully serving j 
these churches and several times each 
month, crossing, by private convey- \ 
ance, the Blue Ridge mountains in all 
kinds of weather to fill his appoint- ; 
ments. He was a kind husband and S 
•wise father and brought up his chil- ; 
dren in the nuture and admonition of ! 
the Lord. Three of them — viz, — 'Mrs. 
Emily Booton — (widow of Elder J. K. | 
Booton) and Mrs. Lucy G. Brumback 
of Virginia, and Mr- T. H Lauck of 
Texas, survive him and are devoted 
members of their father's church and 
love the doctrine and practice so ably 
defended by him. He fell asleep in 
Jesus, in the full triumph of faith, 
February 6, 1875. 



JOSHUA LAWRENCE. 

Lawrence, Elder Joshua was a native 
of North Carolina. He was a great sin- 
ner but found a great Saviour, who call- 
ed him by His grace and made him one 
of the ablest and boldest ministers of 
the New Testament in modern times. 
For more than forty years he advo- 
cated powerfully and fearlessly, both 
from pulpit and press, liberty of con- 
science, the specialty, spirituality and 
efficacy of God's salvation, and the 
unscripturalness and corruption of all 
the money-based religious institutions 
of the nineteenth century notwith- 
standing storms of slander and vitup- 
eration, and threats against his life, 
and, during the latter part of his life, 
great physical debility and suffering. 
He was p ofoundly acquainted with 
the scripture and church history. Few 
men could command larger audiences, 
or so entertain the attention of hear- 
ers. He was sometimes known, while 
asleep, to give out a hymn, sing, pray 
and preach a long sermon, without re- 
membering anything of it when he 
awoke. He was pastor of several 
churches. His church at Tarboro ex- 
perienced in his last days, a glorious 
revival for which he had long prayed. 
He was born in Edgecombe County, 
September 10, 1778 and died in the 



same county, January 23, 1843 - was 
reared on a farm and had not the ad- 
vantages of a liberal education, united 
with the church in early manhood and 
began preaching at the age of twenty- 
three. He was a member of the Kehu- 
kee Association which was organized 
in 1765 and which never favored mod- 
ern missionnsm and was present at 
this association held at Log Chapel in 
Martin County in the year 1803 when 
the query in reference to missions, 
money-based societies, etc., was intro- 
duecd by Elder Martin Ross. The sub- 
ject matter of this query continued to 
be a subject of contention which he 
opposed with all his eloquence and 
ability until it ended in the unhappy 
and final division among the Baptists 
of this state in the year 1827. In this 
division he took a bold stand in de- 
fense of the ancient practice of the 
Baptists and sided with what is now 
known as the Primitive Baptists and 
ever remained one. Though his ene- 
mies have endeavored to injure his 
strong and noble character and great 
influence as a preacher and writer by 
reporting that before he died he re- 
nounced the doctrine he had preached, 
yet an account of his sickness and 
death written by Elder R D. Hart who 
was his yoke-fellow in the gospel fully 
denies and proves untrue such slander- 
ous reports. On his death bed he said 
he had never been more fully estab- 
lished in the doctrine and practice for 
which he had for forty years contend- 
ed, and only wished he could have 
preached it more. 




M. T. LAWRENCE. 

Lawrence, Elder M. T., of Hamilton, 
N. C, was born in Edgecombe County, 
N. C, July 23, 1848. He is the son of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



161 



Joshua L. and Harriett (Mays) Law- 
.rence, and grandson of Elder Joshua 
Lawrence, a Primitive Baptist minis- 
ter of great ability. At an early age 
he was convicted of sin and made to 
feel his lost and ruined state by na- 
ture. He felt, however, that he could 
make peace with God by good works 
when it was more convenient for him 
to. do so. But in this he was mistaken. 
His troubles on account of sin grew 
worse — coming on him like the winds 
and increasing in strength from a 
gentle breeze to a gale. He was, in 
1873, relieved of this heavy burden in 
the same way — decreasing in a gen- 
tle^ unobserved manner — luntil he 
found a new hope in his heart and 
a new song in his mouth — even 
praises unti Jesus, love for God and 
love for His people sprang up, and he 
united with the church at Conoho, in 
1873, and was baptized by Elder John 
W. Purvis. Before he united with the 
church he had impressions to prgach 
Jesus, was licensed in 1878, and or- 
dained in 1880. Is now pastor of four 
churches near his home, is clerk of 
the Kehukee Association, is a useful 
man, a gifted preacher, a good neigh- 
bor and greatly loved by his churches. 




ROBT. C LEACHMAN. 

Leachman, Elder Robt. C. was born 
January 1811, and died February 19, 
1869, at bis home in Manassas, Va. He 
was baptized by Elder Samuel Trott 
in the fellowship of the Bethlehem 
Church in about the year 1837 was li- 
censed to preach the gospel in 1838, 
and was ordained to the work of the 
ministry at Bethlehem in 1839. During 
all his life, except what time he was 



driven from his home during the late 
war_ he continued to hold his residence 
within five miles of the place of his 
birth. Elder Gilbert Beebe wrote of 
him: "As a minister of the gospel he 
was truly one of Zion's sons, 'that had 
grown up in his youth.' From the time 
of his connection with the church of 
God no blemish has soiled his charac- 
ter. As an humble, devoted follower 
of the Lamb and servant of the church, 
no one could be more devoted or inde- 
fatigable. Regardless of his own ease 
or pecuniary interests, he labored 
more abundantly than any of his con- 
temporaries. All who were acquainted 
with him concede that his gifts for the 
ministry were of the very highest or- 
der. His manner was bold and fearless 
of man, and at the same time, he was 
meek, humble and tender in his feel- 
ings. His gift for argument, illustra- 
tion and elucidation of the doctrine 
were powerful, clear and unanswera- 
ble, while his address was easy and re- 
markably engaging. Thousands, even 
of those who did not love the doc- 
trine, were fond of hearing him and 
respected him for his talent, while 
they had no relish for the truth he so 
forcibly proclaimed. 



G W. LEE. 



Lee, Elder G. W. (1842-1908), of 
McKinzee, Ala., was devoted to his 
brethren and the cause of Christ. His 
unabating zeal and labor of love won 
and preserved unto him the unshaken 
confidence and esteem of his breth- 
ren. He was a member of the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church forty-four years 
and was for thirty-seven years the 
pastor of his home church (Eliza- 
beth). This speaks for his worth and 
integrity as a Baptist and minister. 
They loved him at his death as they 
did in his early ministerial life. Elder 
Lee, served in the Confederate army 
sustaining, there, in one of its heated 
battles, the loss of his right arm. 
This, at the close of the war, together 
with his poverty would have driven 
many to despair; but his untarnished 
character backed by unusual energy, 
and we would confidentially add, the 
providences of God, brought to him 
many unexpected and unsought fav- 
ors. There was never a man tnat 
commanded higher respect from those 
who knew him, and that acquaintance, 
especially in South Alabama, was 
very extensive. He was twice elected 
to the state legislature, and held in 
his life many offices of public trust to 



162 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



his own credit and satisfaction of his 
constituents. His life of public trust 
was not due to his early educational 
advantages, but to his high traits of 
character, for he was a self-made man 
in that respect. While he suffered 
many afflictions and deprivations, 
still he was wonderfully blessed 
through life, financially, so that he 
■could have, by c'ovetousness, died 
wealthy. But his philanthropic heart 
so filled with devotion to his fellow- 
man and especially to his brethren, 
brought him to his journey's end with 
only a moderately comfortable sup- 
port, which was all he seemed to de- 
sire. 




HORACE H. LEFFERTS. 

Lefferts, Elder Horace H., of War- 
wick, N. Y., son of Geo. W. and Sarah 
P. Lefferts, who were members of 
Southampton Old School Baptist 
Church, was born in Bucks County, 
Pa., April 23, 1879. In his seventeenth 
year of age, while a student at the 
West Chester State Normal School 
preparing for the profession of teach- 
ing, he was given a sweet hope in 
Jesus, and four years later, December, 
1900, united with Southampton Old 
School Baptist Church and was bap- 
tized by Elder F. A. Chick, the pastor, 
Elder S. H. Durand being ill at the 
time and thus unable to administer the 
ordinance. He was licensed to preach 
in April, 1902, and ordained June 5, 
1903. In September, 1903 he was mar- 
ried to Miss Ella Adams, daughter of 
the late Elder William Adams, of near 
Covington, Ga. In December, 1905, he 
was called to the pastoral care of the 
Old School Baptist Church at War- 
wick, N. Y., accepted in April, 1906, 



and moved there the following year 
where he still resides. Elder Lef- 
ferts was in September, 1908, called to 
the pastoral care of the churches at 
Frying Pan, Va., New Valley, Va._ and 
Mill Creek W. Va,, all formerly served 
by the late Elder E. V. White and now 
(January, 1909) has under considera- 
tion this call. He is a young, zealous 
and gifted soldier of Jesus, satisfied 
with the doctrine and practice of the 
Apostolic Church and has served as 
Moderator of the Warwick Old School 
Baptist Association. 



WM. HENRY LEGGETT. 

Leggett, Elder Wi. Henry, of Scot- 
land Neck., N. C, son of Noah and 
Martha (Brodley) Leggett, was born 
in Edgecombe County, N. C, Febru- 
ary 24, 1844. His opportunities for an 
education were limited, though by 
close observation and the application 
of a portion of his time to reading he 
became a man of general information. 
Early in life he was convicted of sin, 
and some time afterwards was given 
a sweet hope in Jesus, and in May, 
1874, united with Williams Church 
and was baptized by Elder J W. John- 
son. The following year he was mar- 
ried to 'Miss Bettie Pittman who has 
proven a true companion. About the 
year 1884 he bought, and moved on 
a farm, near Deep Creek Church in 
Halifax County, N C, and moved his 
membership to this church. Soon 
afterwards he was ordained deacon, 
and in 1889 was ordained to the min- 
isterial work by Elders W. F. Staton 
and W. B. Strickland. Elder Leggett 
is a 'meek, humble and lovely brother 
and God has blessed his ministry to 
the comfort of many of His people 



JOHN LELAND. 

Leland, Elder John (1754-1841), a 
native of Grafton, Mass., was brought 
under conviction for sin and also con- 
cerned in regard to the ministry in his 
eighteenth year, experienced a hope 
in Christ and was baptized and began 
to exercise in public in his twentieth 
year, was married in his twenty-sec- 
ond year, and, during the sixty-seven 
years of his ministry labored with his 
own hands, never soliciting money for 
himself, went forth entirely undirected 
and unsupported by missionary socie- 
ties or funds, preached from four to 
fourteen times a week, from Massa- 
chusetts to South Carolina, traveling 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



163 



more than a thousand miles, sometimes 
on foot, but mostly on horseback, bap- 
tized 1,525 persons on a creditable 
profession of faith, only one or two of 
whom ever attended Sunday schools, 
faithfully preached the word unmixed 
with the doctrines and commandments 
of men, not for filthy lucre, but of a 
ready mind, zealously opposed Sunday 
schools, theological seminaries, a sal- 
aried ministry and moneyed religious 




JOHN LELAND 

institutions endured great and numer- 
ous persecutions, was an earnest advo- 
cate of civil and religious liberty, wrote 
about thirty pamphlets and many 
hymns, and, it is said could never 
preach without getting into the third 
chapter of John and declaring the nec- 
essity of being born again. He 
preached in four hundred and thirty- 
six meeting-houses, thirty-seven court 
houses, several capitals, academies and 
school houses, barns, tobacco houses, 
dwelling houses and many hundreds 
of times on stages in the open air. In 
1835, after the division with the New 
School Baptists, he wrote "I have been 
preaching sixty years to convince men 
that human powers were too degener- 
ate to effect a change of heart by self- 
exertion, and all the revivals of relig- 
ion that I have seen have substantially 
accorded with that sentiment." In 
1832 he wrote to the Signs of the 
Times: "In these days of novelty, we 
are frequently addressed from the pul- 
pit as follows: 'Professors of religion, 
you stand in the way of God and sin- 
ners, give up your old hope and come 
now into the work God cannot convert 
sinners while you are stumbling blocks 
in the way. Sinners are stumbling 
over you into hell. Profane sinners, I 
call upon you to flee from the wrath, 



to come, come this minute and give 
your heart to God, or you will seal 
your damnation. God has given you 
the power, and will damn you if you do 
not use it. God has done all He can, 
and will do no more. Look not for a 
change of heart; a change of purpose 
is all that is necessary. "Now," says 
Leland, "I have not so learned Christ. 
I do not understand the scriptures in 
that light. It is not the voice of my be- 
loved. It sounds like the voice of a 
stranger and I dare not follow it. The 
missionary establishment, in its va- 
rious departments, is a stupendous in- 
stitution. Literary and theological 
schools, Bible and tract societies, for- 
eign and domestic missions, general, 
state, county and district conventions, 
Sunday School unions, etc., are all in- 
cluded in it. To keep it in motion, 
missionary boards, presidents, treasur- 
ers, corresponding secretaries, agents, 
printers, binders, teachers, runners, 
collectors, mendicants, etc., are all in 
requisition. This machinery is pro- 
pelled by steam (money) and is not 
run by the wind of 'Heaven. Sunday 
schools are very fashionable and are 
considered by many as the great lock- 
link which unites nature and grace. ' 'In 
183G he wrote: "Would not a new trans- 
lation cf some passages in the New 
Testament, according to our present 
dialect and customs be acceptable? 
In Matt., x, 7, read thus, 'And as ye go 
preach to the people, your money is es- 
sential to the salvation of sinners, and 
therefore, form into societies, and use 
all devisable means collect money for 
the Lord's treasury; for the millen- 
nium is at hand. In mark X:16 read, 
He that has attended Sunday schools, 
had his mind informed by tracts, con- 
tributed to support missions, and 
joined in societies to support benevo- 
lent institutions, shall be saved; the 
rest shall be damned.' I cannot in my 
brief space, mention but a few inci- 
dents in this great man's life, and call 
attention to but a little of his writing, 
but hope enough is given for the read- 
er to clearly see where he stood in 
the division in 1832. The New School 
Baptists claim him, but their claims 
are entirely without foundation. The 
reader is referred to Hassell's History 
pages G22-G28, and to the history of 
his life by Miss L. F. Green, if he 
should wish to further pursue the 
study of Elder Leland's history. 



POSEY G. LESTER. 

Lester, Elder Posey G., of Floyd, 
Va., was born in Floyd County, Va., 
MJarch 12, 1850. He is a son of Wim. 



164 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



T. and Mary M. Lester. There were 
fourteen children, nine of whom 
grew to mature years. The moderatt 
estate of Elder Lester's parents to- 
gether with the ravages of the Civil 
war greatly limited his opportunities 
in early life, rendering his literal suc- 
cess largely due to a persistent ap- 
plication of his personal energies to 
the problems of life which confronted 
him. The inherent qualities which 
have brought him into the literal 
sphere of life which he occupies and 




POSEY G. LESTER 

maintains he regards and esteems as 
an heritage from the life and charac- 
ter of his mother, whose maiden name 
was Simmons and daughter of Elder 
Thos. W. Simmons. His early avoca- 
tion was teaching vocal and literary 
schools. In June, 1873, he professed a 
hope in Christ and joined the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church at White Oak 
Grove and was baptized by Eider 
Amos Dickerson. In December follow- 
ing he began to exercise his minis- 
terial gift, and in October, 187G, was 
ordained. For several years he travel- 
ed locally and taught literally and 
preached the gospel according as his 
gift made room for him. Finally he 
left off teaching and for several years 
devoted his entire time in traveling 
and preaching in more or less of twen- 
ty-one of the states and in Ontario, 
Canada. He has traveled as much as 
13,000 miles in a single year for the 
purpose of preaching Jesus, yet our 
modern missionary friends with ap- 
parently more zeal and less knowl- 
edge, say we cppose missionary work. 
We advocate and practice the Bible 
plan. Since 18S3 Elder Lester has 
been Associate Editor of Zion's Land- 
mark. In 1886 he and Elder S. H. 



Derand compiled and published a very 
acceptable and sound Hymn and Tune 
Book now extensively in use among 
our people in many sections of the 
country. In 1888 in his absence and 
without solicitation from him, he 
was nominated by the Democratic 
party to represent the people of 
his — the Fifth — district of Virginia, 
in the Congress of the United States, 
served in the Fifty-first and Fifty-sec- 
ond Congresses. During this service he 
preached frequently in Washington 
and in other cities and in the 
churches in the adjoining sections. 
He declined to stand for the third 
nomination, preferring to devote 
more of his time to his minis- 
terial work. Since 1901 Elder Lester 
has served as clerk of the Smith's 
River Association, is the pastor of 
three churches and in part supplies 
others, is an able preacher, an excel- 
lent singer, beloved by his people, and 
highly esteemed by the citizenship 
among whom he has ever lived and 
served in various positions of honor 
and trust to wbich they have assigned 
him. 




H. M. LESTER. 

Lester, Elder H. M., of West Vir- 
ginia, was born in MicDowell County, 
W. Va., March 10, 1830; professed a 
hope in Jesus and united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church in his twen- 
ty-seventh year and was baptized by 
Elder Geo. Sizemore. Soon he was im- 
pressed with the duty of preaching 
Jesus, but Jonah-like, tried to flee 
from the Lord. He moved to Ohio, 
but not from his impression. Soon he 
returned to his native state, but could 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



165 



find no rest. He never attended 
school but eight days and having but. 
little education he felt that he could 
not preach. But in the school of ex- 
perience and in the "Whale College" 
he became very proficient, was made 
willing to bear the yoke, began 
preaching and was soon ordained and 
for forty-one years was a faithful min- 
ister His services were mainly con- 
fined to the churches in ihe Elk Horn 
Association though he traveled some 
in other sections He was a great lover 
of peace and well versed in the Scrip- 
tures. Salvation by grace was his 
theme in life and his solace in death. 
He died in the full triumph of a living 
faith August 27, 1901. 



GEO. W. LEWIS. 

Lewis, Elder Geo. W.. The subject 
of this sketch was born in Duboise 
County, Ind., May 1, 1S47, and died at 
French Lick, Ind., January 6, 1907. At 
an early age he became greatly exer- 
cised in mind and was made to see his 
lost and ruined condition by reason 
of sin, and finally realized a sweet 
hope in a Redeemers' love. He united 
with the Baptists known as the Rich- 
land Baptists in the year 1879. He was 
ordained to the work of the ministry 
in 1888. Becoming dissatisfied with 
this people, he united with the Primi- 
tive Baptists at Bethlehem Church, at 
French Lick, Ind., in the year 1894, of 
which church he remained a devoted 
member until death. He was ordained 
to the work of the ministry in May_ 
1897. Elder Lewis was a devoted 
christian, a faithful minister of the 
gospel, a kind and loving husband and 
father, a good neighbor and a worthy 
citizen, an humble, unpretentious man ; 
these characteristics marked his 
course as he journeyed through life, 
loved respected by all with whom he 
came in contact. He died as he lived, 
trusting alone in the Lord. 



W. W. LEWIS. 

Lewis, Elder W. W., of Alabama; 
born in Montgomery County, Ala, Au- 
gust 10, 184G, and died February 12, 
1895. He was a man full of vivacity, 
and more than ordinary energy, pos- 
sessing a jovial nature, he was al- 
ways cheerful. After his return from 
the war in 1865, it pleased the Lord 
to arrest him in his sinful career, by 
showing him the exceeding sinfulness 
of his heart, and ultimately to reveal 



Himself in the riches of His grace to 
his great joy, and everlasting conso- 
lation. He united with the church at 
Bethel, Montgomery County, Ala, 
and was baptized by Elder B. E. Mul- 
lens of Tennessee, and in 1878 was 
liberated by his church to preach, and 
was soon after ordained, and at the 
time of his death he had the care of 
four churches, and was faithful to his 
charges. He died suddenly and in full 
triumph of faith. 



DAVID LILLY. 

Lilly, Elder David, was born in 
Mercer County, West Virginia, April 
14, 1S22, and died at his home near 
Gales Creek, Washington County, 
Ore., May 9, 1900, Brother Lilley pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ in his early 
manhood, and joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church called the Old Camp 
Creek church in Mercer County, W. 
Va., He was ordained to the full work 
of the gospel ministry about 1S84, and 
served churches until his death He 
was married four times and was the 
father of eighteen children — nine boys 
and nine girls. He moved with his 
family from Virginia to Wilson Coun- 
ty, Kan, in the Fall of 1875; lived 
there nine years; moved from Kansas 
to Oregon in the Spring of 1884, and 
settled near Gales Creek, in Washing- 
ton County, where he resided until 
death. Elder Lilley died as he lived, 
a loving, faithful, devoted Christian, 
earnestly contending for the faith 
once delivered to the saints. Salva- 
tion by grace and grace alone was his 
theme. 





LINE. 



Line, Elder W. L # , of LaFountaine, 
Ind., was born near his present home, 



166 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



June 14, 1851. His parents' home was 
a home for Baptists and his earliest 
recollections are those of hearing 
christian people talk of their experi- 
ences, hope in Jesus, etc. He was, in 
his fifteenth year convicted of sin while 
attending a revival meeting. His young 
associates would banter each other to 
join the church while his heart consid- 
ered it mockery. During this period 
he also attended Baptist meetings and 
while he could not understand the doc- 
trine they preached yet he was com- 
forted when they preached experimen- 
tally, and on February 16, 1867, under 
the preaching of Elder John A. Thomp- 
son he was encouraged to take up the 
Cross. Soon he felt impressed to 
preach the sweet gospel to others but 
being a seventeen year old boy he felt 
too young and otherwise unqaulified, 
and it was May, 1878, before he was 
ordained. He has since had the care 
of from two to four churches. In Nov- 
ember, 1887, he was married to Miss E. 
A. McNaughton of Ohio, who has not 
only been a keeper at home and a help- 
meet in the fullest sense^ but has also 
encouraged her husband to be faithful 
to the churches and go at duty's call. 
Elder Line is an able minister and 
highly esteemed by his brethren for 
his faithful labors in the cause of 
truth. 

M. L. LIPP. 



Lipp, Elder M. L., was born in 
North Carolina, November , 1815, mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Davenport in 1835, 
and in 1837 moved to Russell County, 
Va., where he lived until his death in 
1894. He professed a hope in Christ 
in 1839, united with the Primitive 
Baptist, and was in a few years or- 
dained to the work of the gospel min- 
istry, and during his life served sev- 
eral churches, and traveled and 
preached in the states of Virginia, 
Kentucky, North Carolina and Ten- 
nessee. In 1853 he was elected clerk of 
court of Wise County, Virginia, and 
served for twelve years; and in 1868 
was elected to the legislature of Vir- 
ginia. He was also, for several years, 
Moderator of Stoney Creek Associa- 
tion, and in all the positions of re- 
sponsibility and honor in which, he 
served he ever proved faithful to the 
cause of truth as he understood it, 
and left a good name upon the pages 
of history. 

WM. LIPPINCOTT. 

Lippincott, Elder Wm., was born in 
Licking County, Ohio, October 28, 1819, 
departed this life in Columbus, O., 



October 18, 1905. It can well be said 
of him he was conscientious and al- 
ways felt to rejoice in the sweet spirit 
which manifests a child of God. His 
labors among the saints were always 
appreciated, and while he rests from 
them, his works do follow him. The 
gospel that he preached bore sweet 
evidence that he neither received nor 
learned it of man, but by revelation of 
Jesus Christ. In its proclamation the 
sheep and lambs were fed, and the old 
brother will live in the memory of those 
who believe in God and Christ. He 
joined the Baptists in May, 1855 and 
was baptized by Elder James Witham. 
In January, 1870 he was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry and for thirty- 
five years was a faithful soldier of 
Jesus. 



J. B. LITTLE. 

Little, Elder J. B., of Rison, Ark., 
was born in Union County, N. C , 
July 16, 1835, convicted of sin and 
saw his just condemnation under the 
law in his seventeenth year, and for 
several years felt to be without God 
and without hope. But in July, 1860, 
he was given hope in Jesus as his sin 
bearer and afterwards united with 
Cane Creek Church and was baptized 
by Elder N. M. Goodrich. Elder Little 
tells how he began preaching in the 
following words: "We went in the 
house, he made a little talk and sang 
and prayed. He called on me I got up 
and told the brethren I wanted to talk 
a little about what Jesus came to do. 
I did not think of anything but the 
subject until I saw all the brethren 
crying. The first thing I thought of 
was now you have exposed your igno- 
rance, disgraced the Old Baptists, 
they are sorry for you and crying 
about it. I closed abruptly I guess, 
started out of the house, I wanted to 
get out of company, when one of the 
brethren near the door, said to me, 
'How long did you talk?' I said, 'fif- 
teen minutes I guess;" he said, "if 
my watch tells the truth, you talked 
an hour and five minutes.' I said 
'your watch didn't tell the truth.' 
From th-en until now I have been 
trying to preach, and sometimes try- 
ing to quit. Have made seemingly 
many failures, but it don't hurt so 
bad now as it did in my young days 
in the ministry." Elder Little was or- 
dained in August, 1872, has since had 
the care of churches, and is a faithful 
loyal servant of the Master. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



167 



SINGLETON C. LITTLE. 

Little, Elder Singleton C, of. Big 
Lick, N. C, was born in Stanly Coun- 
ty, N C, January 5, 1823, grew up to 
manhood a good, moral man; and 
when blest with a hope, led a most 
pious life and joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church. Feeling his unworthi- 
ness, he labored under the impres- 
sions to preach for eighteen years be- 
fore he entered upon such duty. He 
was ordained about 18G8, and has giv- 
en thirty-nine years of his life to the 
service of the gospel ministry A man 
of robust build, being well preserved 
in health and strength till late years 
he has attended a number of churches 
regularly until age and infirmity set 
in. Elder Little is an able defender of- 
Primitive and Apostolic doctrine, be- 
ing most convincing, eloquent and 
dignified in his discourses He is just- 
ly considered one of our most able 
ministers. Before becoming infirm he 
was for a long term of years the mod- 
erator of the Bear Creek Association. 



ISAAC LONG. 

Long, Elder Isaac, of Tennessee, who 
died in 1856, was born in the state of 
Virginia, where it pleased the Lord to 
call him out of nature's darkness unto 
his marvelous light and the glorious 
liberties of the children of God. He 
joined the Baptist Church of Christ 
while young and soon was called to the 
work of the ministry and about fifty 
years of his life was spent in preaching 
the everlasting gospel of the Son of 
God. His theme was free grace and 
experimental religion. He was a faith- 
ful herald of the Cross. 



the unsearchable riches of Christ to 
a waiting and dying world. He was 
confined to his room about three 
years with what doctors called nerv- 
ous prostration, but he bore his afflic- 
tion with great patience. When any of 
his brethren would come to see him 
his whole theme was God and godli- 
ness, saying that his time was near at 
hand and that he longed to see the 
summons come. Elder Lord was a 
man that stood well among his breth- 
ren and also with the people at large, 
and was well known for his pious 
walk and Christian fortitude 



J. W. LORD. 

Lord, Elder J, W„ the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Baldwin 
County, Ga., August 12, 1828. When 
he grew to manhood he moved to Ap- 
pling County, about the year 1870, and 
there remained until his death on 
June 29, 1903 Elder Lord was raised 
by 'Methodist parents, and joined the 
Methodist Church when quite young, 
and remained with them until about 
the year 18G3, when he joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church, and there 
remained a faithful member and min- 
ister of the gospel until death He was 
ordained to the gospel ministry in 
1877, and went far and near preaching 




HENRY LOUTHAN. 

Louthan, Elder Henry, of Missouri. 
The editor regrets that a complete 
sketch of this worthy and highly es- 
teemed minister could not be secured. 
The following is taken from Elder 
Cash's book published in 1896: "He 
was born in Virginia and began preach- 
ing at the age of nineteen. He moved 
to Missouri in an early day and settled 
in Shelby County, near Lunies Creek 
Church. Later he moved to Palmyra, 
Mo., and at his death endowed the 
church at that place for the benefit of 
future pastors. He was uncompromis- 
ing in doctrine, ready to help the needy 
and was held in great respect by the 
churches. 



MICHAEL LOVERIDGE. 

Loveridge, Elder Michael, of Ore- 
gon, was born in North Curry, Sum- 



168 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



merset Shire, England, April 17, 1803, 
and there joined the Strict Baptists. 
He came to Illinois and from there 
went to the state of Oregon in 1865 




^ft&» 



MICHAEL LOVERIDGE 



and was there ordained the following 
year in May. He was a lover of good 
men and peace in the churches. He 
died December 20, 18S0. 




GEORGE LOY. 

Loy, Elder George (1817-1875). The 

subject of this sketch was born in 
Hainsline County, W. Va. He was rais- 
ed a Methodist but not being satisfied 
with their doctrine and practice he 
united with the Primitive Baptists 
and was baptized by Elder John Ar- 
nold. He commenced preaching about 



the year of 1851 and was later ordain- 
ed by Elders John Arnold and Joseph 
Ruckman. During his long service in 
the Master's vineyard he traveled and 
preached in West Virginia, Pennsyl- 
vania, Maryland and Virginia, and on 
his visits in Virginia associated with 
Elders Wm. Lauck, Ambrose Booton, 
Buck, Mclntuff, Correll, Jennings and 
others of that day. It is said Elder 
Loy was the first Southern preacher 
to visit the Baptists of Pennsylvania, 
after the close of the Civil war. Dur- 
ing the war he visited the army at 
times, and had a son in the service. 
During his last days the "Means" Bap- 
tists were trying to introduce their 
new measures in his churches and 
one of his last wishes was that he 
might be spared to oppose their in- 
novations. He was noted for his mild 
manner of preaching, for his humility 
and meekness. 




J. L. LUDWICK. 



Ludwick, Elder J. L., was born 
in Rockbridge County, Va., June 
6, 1846, and united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church, October 17, 1873. He 
was ordained in March, 1880, and has 
had the care of from two to four 
churches ever since. He is an humble, 
but devoted follower of the Master. 
Further particulars of Elder Ludwick's 
life and labors could not be obtained 
from which to write a more detailed 
notice. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



169 



WM. LUNDY. 

Lundy, Elder Wm., was born in 
Carroll County, Va., in 1823, and died 

in — i . When growing to manhood 

he had not the advantages of schools, 
hut by hard study at home he acquir- 
ed sufficient education to become a 
teacher in the public schools of his 
county. In 1841 he was married to 
Lucy Payne who, for forty-nine years 
was a faithful companion to him .He 
united with the Primitive Baptists in 
1854, and when baptized, it is said, 
came out of the water preaching 
Jesus, and until his death was a 
faithful, earnest and zealous preach- 
er. When Virginia called for volun- 
teers in 1861, he organized a compa- 
ny and was made captain, and during 
all the years of carnage and blood 
shed he failed not to obey duty's call, 
but proved a valiant soldier, and when 
the war was over, he with renewed 
zeal, entered upon the work of His 
Master, and for forty-five years of 
faithful service he traveled and 
preached in seventeen siates, mainlj 
the south and middle west, and in all 
of his travels to preach the gospel he 
went without any guarantee from men 
but through many dangers and all 
kinds of weather he pressed onward 
in the simple, but uncommon faith, of 
the apostles trusting that God would 
direct, protect and open the heart of 
his people to minister to his temporal 
needs. A typical mountaineer, a 
strong preacher, good citizen and kind 
neighbor, faithful unto death, he end- 
ed his course with joy, and was a con- 
vincing example of the power of God 
to call and qualify for the work of the 



ministry. He was from 1874 until his 
death, moderator of the Mountan As- 
sociation 




E. E, LUNDY. 

Lundy, Elder E. E., of Wilmington, 
X. O, was born in Carroll County, Va., 
April, 1867 ; received a hope in Jesus 
and united with the Primitive Baptists 
in his twenty-first year and was bap- 
tized by Elder J. R. Sparks. Two years 
later he was licensed to preach, and 
in 1892, was ordained and spent the 
first ten years of his ministerial life 
in evangelistic work, mostly in North 
Carolina, though he has traveled and 
preached in several states. He is now 
pastor of (several) churches, within 
the bounds of White Oak, Contetea 
and Kehukee Association, and does 
much preaching in destitute places, 
and his labors are being blessed of 
the Lord, and his faithful service 
much appreciated by his churches. 



M 



BENJAMIN MAHON. 

Marion, Elder Benjamin. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was a faithful min- 
ister who served churches in the 
bounds of the Okom Association 
most of his life, and was, for some 
years before his death, moderator of 
above association. He was born in 
Virginia in 1822, moved to Fayette 
County, 111., in 1833, and united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church in 1848, 
was ordained in 1852, and died in 
1903. 



ISAAC MAHURIN. 

Mahurin, Elder Isaac, of Linneus, 
Mo., was born in Grayson County, 
Kentucky, June 18, 1838, and moved to 
Missouri in the year 1859. He united 
with Liberty Church, Linn County, 
Mo., in May, 1861, and has a member- 
ship in that church at the present 
time. He was ordained in August, 
1876, and while not taking the care 
of any church as pastor alone, has 
meekly tried to serve the brethren 
where they desired his labors. (From 



170 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Elder Cash's book 1896.) Further in- 
formation could not be obtained. 



B. F. MARTIN. 

Martin, Elder B. F., the subject of 
this notice was born in Henry Coun- 
ty, Va., about the year 1855, where he 
lived until his father moved to Smith 
County, where he grew to manhood, 
and married. There the Lord found 
him as he did Jacob of old, and led 
him about and instructed him. He 
taught him that salvation is of the 
Lord, and bid him publish the good 
news to His people. About the year 
1878, the church where he was a mem- 
ber, seeing his call, and being satis- 
fied with his gift, set him apart to the 
full work of the ministry. His manner 
of preaching was not such as to at- 
tract the worldly minded, but to the 
spiritually minded he was simply 
Christ-like, humble, loving and gent'e. 
He possessed little of this world's 
goods, nor did he desire the applause 
of men, but was willing to labor with 
his own hands to minister to the 
wants of those around him. 



WILLIAM MARTIN. 

Martin, Elder William (1804-1882), 
of West Virginia, was born in Boothe 
County, and moved with his parents 
to Ohio when very young. He grew 
up without advantages of an educa- 
tion but God was pleased to call him 
out of nature's darkness and qualify 
him for a useful life in the ministry. 
In early youth he was convicted cf 
sin, given a hope in Jesus and a desire 
to preach Him to others. But feeling 
unworthy and unable for such a work 
he, at the age of sixteen, left the pa- 
rental roof, thinking to run away 
from his trouble. But God's providen- 
tial care followed him and directed 
him to the church and His people to 
whom he made known his desire; was 
received into their fellowship, and 
some years afterward, ordained to the 
gospel ministry. At the age of twenty- 
one he was married to Elizabeth 
Hensley. As a minister his labors 
were mostly among the churches of 
the Feays Valley Association until the 
mission system was introduced, which 
brought about a split in the year 1835, 
and Elder Martin was the only minis- 
ter in the entire association that 
stood firm and opposed all the inno- 
vations of men. In November, 1835, 



he met with the delegates from the 
six churches which remained unshak- 
en by the new wind of doctrine. These 
withdrew from the Feays Valley As- 
sociation on account of her disorder 
and was organized into an associa- 
tion which was called the Pocatalico. 
Elder Martin served as moderator of 
this association about forty years. He 
began preaching at the age of eigh- 
teen and served in the ministry for 
sixty-one years. He was an able min- 
ister, wrote many beautiful hymns, 
and publisher a song-book known as 
"Zion's Friend." 



JAMES MARTINDALE. 

Martindale, Elder James (1822-1885) 
This faithful soldier of the Cross was 
born and reared in Indiana, received a 
common school education, united with 
the church under the preaching of 
Elder Wilson Thompson and was bap- 
tized by him. He was a minister that 
was not only loved by his own people 
but by those "without the gate." He 
had "a good report" from all and liv- 
ed a life of usefulness. At the time of 
his death he was serving four 
churches and was moderator of the 
Whitewater Association. 



WILLIAM MARVIN. 

Marvin, Elder William (1780-1854), 
of Virginia, was extensively and fav- 
orably known as an able and zealous 
defender of the gospel of our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ, uniform in his 
deportment, quiet and dignified 
among his brethren. He was privileg- 
ed with no ordinary degree of spirit- 
ual-mindedness; and there was given 
him more than a superficial view of 
the plague of his heart. During his 
last days his mind was stayed upon 
God, and as he felt that he was draw- 
ing near the end of his journey, he 
longed to depart. His desire in life 
was that he might be like Christ, and 
in prospect of death he rejoiced that 
his desire was about to be realized; 
for as the dread monster appeared 
more plain to his view, he called to 
his support, and the consolation of 
those surrounding him, the following 
among many other passages from the 
word of God: Ps. xlii. 5 — "Why art 
thou cast down, O my soul? and why 
are thou disquieted within me? hope 
thou in God: for I shall yet praise 
him, who is the health of my counte- 
nance, and my God." 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



171 




DANIEL M. MASTERS. 

Masters, Elder Daniel M. The sub- 
ject of this sketch -u'as born in Christ- 
ian County, 111., November 8, 1868. 
When growing up he had serious 
thoughts and much anxiety about his 
future state, and his sins were re- 
vealed to him and made to appear ex- 
ceedingly sinful. Though, by good 
works, he tried to get relief from his 
burden, he was brought to the point 
where he had to stand still and see 
the salvation of the Lord. But He 
who brought him to see himself a 
vile sinner also revealed Himself to 
him as the Saviour of sinners. This 
was in 1889, and in 1893 he united 
with the Primitive Baptists, and in 
1898 was ordained a deacon. Three 
years later he was ordained to the 
ministry, has the care of churches, 
and is faithful and devoted to the 
cause of truth. 



W. S. MATTHEWS. 

Matthews, Elder W. S., was born in 
Howard County, Mo., December 27, 
1827, then moved with his parents to 
Johnson County, from there to Platte 
County, where he grew to manhood. 
He professed a hope in Christ July 3, 
1843, and was baptized in the fellow- 
ship of Hillsborough Church the third 
Sunday in August by Elder William 
Simpson. He was married to Miss 
Frances Deshazer in DeKalb County, 
Mo., November 15, 1846, moved to 
Kansas in 1859, and was licensed to 
preach July 4, 1874, by the Harmony 
Church in Nemaha County, Kan. He 
was ordained by the same church, 
May 8, 1875, moved to Oregon in 1879 



and has attended four churches most 
of the time since. He has been mod- 
erator of Siloam Association for a 
number of years, and is a faithful, 
zealous and useful minister. 



F. M. MATTOX. 

Mattox, Elder F. M., of Indiana, was 
a son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Mat- 
tox, and was born near Hardensburg, 
Washington County, Indiana, April 4, 
1840. He was united in marriage to 
Mary Adaline Wible, April 10, 1862. 
Brother Mattox united with the Sink- 
ing Spring Regular or Primitive Bap- 
tist Church by experience at the 
April meeting, 1861. He was or- 
dained to the office of Deacon 
at the April meeting, 1869, which 
position he faithfully filled until set 
apart to the work of the gospel min- 
istry. He was ordained to the full 
work of the ministry the fifth Satur- 
day in May, 1875, by a presbytery 
composed of Elders Samuel McMa- 
han, James Strickland, and Wesley 
Poison. He was a devoted Christian, 
a faithful minister of the gospel, an 
humble, unpretentious man. These 
characteristics marked the entire 
course of his life and caused him to 
be known as one who loved peace — a 
peacemaker in all that the word im- 
plies. He was an able defender of the, 
dostrine of the Bible, and while he 
was conservative in his deportment 
toward men, he made no compromise 
with error, nor sacrifice of Bible 
truth. Elder Mattox was at the time 
of his death and several years pre- 
vious moderator of the Blue River 
Association. 



E. C. MAULDIN. 

Mauldin, Elder E. C, of Bebb, 
Texas, was born in Edgefield, S. C, 
January 9, 1809, moved with his pa- 
rents to Alabama, in his eight year, 
and later to Tennessee. When twenty 
years old he was married to Miss 
Eliza Biggs, a daughter of Elder Asa 
Biggs, united with the church 1846, 
and ordained 1858. The work of Elder 
Maudlin's ministerial life was spent 
in Texas, but a sketch of his labors 
and the date of his death could not be 
obtained by the author. 



JOHN A. MAXWELL. 

Maxwell, Elder John A., was born 
in Cumberland County, North Caroli- 
na, September 12, 1826, and died Oc- 



172 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



tober 12, 1906. He united with Pied- 
mont Church, September, 1857, and or- 
dained to the gospel ministry Decem- 
ber 20, 1874. His parents moved from 
North Carolina in 1832, to Decatur 
County, Ga., where he lived and died 
in three miles of where he was raised. 
Elder Maxwell was a good husband 
and father, firm and positive in his 
family, though not tyrannical. He was 
established and sincere in his convic- 
tions, and provided a handsome living 
for his family. He was firm in all that 
he considered just and right, unflinch- 
ing in all that he thought pertained 
to the faith once delivered to the 
saints, in his practice., and ministry 
of the gospel. 




G. E. MAYFIELD. 

Mayfield, Elder G. E., of Elgin, Ore., 
was born in Washington County, Ore., 
October 29, 184G. When an infant his 
parents moved to Missouri, and when 
about grown moved to Oregon. His 
parents were Primitive Baptists and 
raised him right but could not make 
him love the Old School Baptist doc- 
trine and in April, 1867, he united 
with the Missionary Baptists. Soon 
afterward he was thrown in company 
with the Primitive Baptists of Clock- 
amas County, Ore., and occasionally 
attended their meetings, soon learned 
that they preached his experience as 
well as" sustaining their doctrine fully 
by the Bible. About this date— 1867— 
he was married to Miss Francis Ray, 
and they both united with the Primi- 
tive Baptists April, 1869, and were 



baptized by Elder J. P. Allison. In 
1873 he was licensed and in October, 
1876, was ordained by Elders John 
Stipp, Geo. Wills, M. Loveridge, J. P. 
Allison and R. Thank. His wife died 
in 1875, and the following year he was 
married to Miss Amanda Westerfield. 
In 1S78 he was in the constitution of 
Big Spring Church, Union County, 
Ore., and has since served this church 
as pastor. Elder Mayfield is an hum- 
ble, earnest and faithful minister, is 
in his sixty-second years of age and 
desires to press onward in the Christ- 
ian warfare and finish his course with 
joy. 



E. A. MEADERS. 

Meaders, Elder E. A. The subject of 
this sketch was a native of Tennes- 
see. He obtained a hope in early 
life, and united with the Old 
School Baptists and began preaching 
when he was about twenty years of 
age; emigrated to the state of Mis- 
sissippi in 1835 when but few white 
people lived in North Mississippi. He 
helped to organize the Tallahatchie 
Association and was one of her most 
active ministers. For many years he 
lived in the town of Oxford, Miss., 
during which time he felt deeply im- 
pressed of the Lord to travel and 
preach through the Northern states 
and Canada, which he did in 1856-'57. 
During this trip he went to Washing- 
ton, D. C., and while there a friend of 
his introduced him to President Bu- 
channan as a Baptist minister, where- 
upon the President asked him if he 
was a Calvanistic Baptist. Elder Mead- 
ers calmly replied "no," giving as 
his reason that Calvin sprinkled 
babies and persecuted the Baptists. 
The President replied, 'Why, I was 
sprinkled when an infant." "Well, 
Mr. President,' said Elder Mead- 
ers, "If you were filthy enough 
to need washing and they only 
sprinkled you they left you all the 
worse." Next morning the President 
sent for Elder Meaders and offered 
him the governorship of the Territory 
of Utah, when the Elder said, "Thank 
you, Mr. President, I cannot conde- 
scend to accept." Elder Meaders was 
one of the most firm, uncompromising, 
Baptists, as well as one of the most 
devoted and self-sacrificing ministers 
among our people. He was an ex- 
emplary minister without a spot upon 
his moral character, and passed away 
in the triumphs of faith at the age of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



173 



eighty-six, having been the Moderator 
of the Tallahatchie and Hopewell as- 
sociations for many years. 




STANTON MEADS. 

Meads, Elder Stanton. The subject 
of this notice was a native of Pas- 
quatank County, N. C He was born 
in 1808, and united with the Primi- 
tive Baptists before the division and 
remained faithful to the cause of God, 
not being carried about by winds of 
doctrine. He was in 1860, ordained to 
the work of the ministry by Elders 
Hodges Gallop and Caleb Sawyer, and 
was a faithful pastor until his death 
in 1878. His son, Elder Charles 
Meads, is faithfully walking the way 
in which his honored father served 
Jesus. 




of poor parentage, raised on a farm 
and had but few opportunities of an 
education, though by dint of study 
and close observation stored his mind 
with much useful information. When 
young he would have many serious 
thoughts about his eternal welfare 
but such thoughts would soon pass 
out of his mind. But in 1867 God re- 
vealed to him his sins, showed him 
his lost condition by nature, and ere 
long by the "still small voice" spoke 
peace to his troubled soul by reveal- 
ing to him Jesus as his Saviour. He 
did not tarry, but went to the people 
he so much loved — the Primitive Bap- 
tists — the same year, was received 
into the fellowship of Flatty Creek 
Church and was baptized by Elder 
Hodges Gallop. He was soon impress- 
ed with the duty of preaching ana 
was ordained to the work July, 1871, 
by Elders Hodges Gallop and J. D. 
Wicker, and has had the care of from 
Church and was baptized by Elder 
Meads is an humble, gentle and peace 
loving man, desires to know nothing 
but Christ and Him crucified, as the 
salvation of siners, and is content 
with the goodness of God's house and 
its simple worship. 



CHARLES MEADS. 

Meads, Elder Charles, of Weeks- 
viU«, N. C , was born August 6, 1843, 



HENRY MEEKS. 

Meeks, Elder Henry, of Meeks, Ga., 
was born March 6, 1848, reared on 
the farm with poor advantages of 
schools, taught lessons of morality, 
truthfulness and honesty by godly pa- 
rents, entered the Southern army in 
1864, at the age of sixteen, from which 
he was honorably discharged at the 
cessation of hostilities. From a boy he 
.had serious thoughts of life, death and 
eternity, was convicted of sin about 
1868 and for several years was under 
deep conviction. After he was deliv- 
ered from his burden of guilt and 
Jesus was revealed to him as his Sa- 
viour, he, for some years remained 
out of the church waiting for more 
evidence of his acceptance, but in 
1874 united with Providence Church, 
was baptized by Elder Riner, and was 
ordained to the ministry 1877. Elder 
Meeks has served from one to four 
churches since his ordination and 
served his home church twenty-eight 
years, has assisted in the constitu- 
tion of two churches and the ordina- 
tion of nine ministers, has baptized 
about one hundred persons and mar- 
ried many couples and is a useful 
and faithful minister of the New Tes- 
tament. 



174 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



WOODSON MELTON. 

Melton, Elder Woodson of West Vir- 
inia, lived and labored within the 
hounds of the Pocatalico Associations. 
He was a native of Mason County, 
served the churches long and faith- 
fully and was much beloved by his 
people; and the editor regrets that a 
full sketch of his life could not be pre- 
sented. 



JOHN H. MENEFEE. 

Menefee, Elder John H., was a na- 
tive of Page County Va. He was born 
September 23, 1820 'and died March 8, 
1897 in his seventy-seventh year of age. 
Early in life he was convicted of sin 
and found peace and rest alone by 
faith in Jesus. And soon after finding 
this pearl of great price he was im- 
pressed to tell the "good news" to 
others and was ordained to the gospel 
ministry, and for forty years proved 
a fatihful soldier of Jesus. During 
the division of 1890 when the "Regu- 
lar" Baptist, or more generally and 
properly known "Burnham Baptists," 
were cut off by the Old School Bap- 
tists on account of their doctrine and 
practice of human means in the salva- 
tion of sinners, Elder Mienefee re- 
mained with the Old School Baptists 
and continued until the end, preaching 
salvation alone by the sovereign, eter- 
nal, unchangeable mercy of God. Dur- 
ing his long, faithful service he served 
Mill Creek, Brocks Gap and several 
other churches of the Ebenezer Asso- 
ciation and stood in high esteem as 
an able minister of the gospel, but 
a full sketch of his life could not be 
obtained by the editor. 



W. W. MEREDITH. 



Meredith, Elder W. W. This gifted 
minister was highly esteemed and 
dearly beloved for his fatherly, kind, 
humble and gentle manner, and fior 
his devotion to the cause of truth. 
He was a native of Delaware, and liv- 
ed at Felton, at the time of his death 
in 1906. He traveled among the Bap- 
tists of the Northeastern, and some of 
the Southern states, attending several 
sessions of the Kehukee and other 
associations in North Carolina and 
was everywhere well received. The 
editor regrets that a full sketch of his 
useful, exemplary, life could not, for 
want of data, be given. 



PARROTT MEWBORN. 

Mewborn, Elder Parrott, was a na- 
tive of Lenoir County, N C. He was 
born January 1,. 1799, united with 
Bear Creek Church August, 1824, and 
was baptized by Elder Lewis Whit- 
fie'd, was soon ordained to the gospel 
ministry and after nearly forty years 
of faithful service in the Lord's vine- 
yard he died April 29, 18G4. Elder 
Mewborn had a bright experience in 
his change from nature to grace, and 
could truly say "the Lord hath led 
me." He was considered a very able 
dotrinal, experimental and prophetic- 
ical preacher. Many important events, 
such as the Civil war, the overthrow 
of the Civil power of the Pope of 
Rome, etc., were prophesied by him 
and came to pass about the time pre- 
dicted. For many years he was a great 
sufferer from rheumatism. His mind 
became deeply impressed with the 
miraculous cures of diseases made by 
Christ and he was given a desire to 
earnest prayer, and faith to believe 
that Christ would heal him. This He 
did, and in his writings he says: 
"There came virtue and love and fill- 
ed my soul and I felt the good effects, 
rose up and began to praise the Lord 
and stood on the floor." More than 
twenty years have passed and I thank 
and praise the Lord that I have not 
had the rheumatic pains? since." His 
life was an honorable, useful one and 
shed a good influence in the commu- 
nity in which he lived. 



GEORGE MEWBORN. 

Mewborn, Elder George, the oldest 
son of Elder Parrott Mewborn was 
born December 26, 1824. As a boy he 
was bright and industrious, quick to 
learn and a great lover of books. In 
early manhood he taught school and 
worked as a clerk, but by experience < 
learned that he preferred farming, at 
which he was successful. He was, in 
1848. married to Miss Nancy Hardy, 
Some years later he was made to feel 
his sinful condition by nature and 
what he must be by grace to meet God 
in peace, was given* hope in Jesus and 
in 1850 united with the church at 
Mewborn's and was baptized by his 
father. He served his church as clerk 
and deacon and during the latter 
years of his life "commenced to speak 
as a minister and bid fair to become an 
able minister though he was never 
ordained to the full work of the 
ministry." He died in 1859 in his 
thirty-fourth year of age. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



175 



PARROTT MEWBORN JR. 

Mewborn, Eider Parrott Jr., son of 
Elder Parrott Mewborn, was born Au- 
gust 21, 1834, and died April 15, 1831. 
He served in the Civil war, and was 
in the fall of 1865 married to Miss 
Lany Hardy. In 18G8 he was given 
a sweet hope in Jesus and united 
with the church at Mewborns, Green 
County, and was baptized by Elder 
T. W. Wills. In 1873 he was ordained 
to the gospel work by Elders S. Pate 
and Thos. W. Wills. He was a good 
disciplinarian and great lover of 
peace. 




D. A. MEWBORN. 

Mewborn, Elder D. A., of Farmville, 
N. C, was born June 14, 1840. He is a 
son of Elder Parrott Mewborn, was 
raised on a farm, and as a boy ac- 
quired a love for, and habit of read- 
ing. As advantages of school were 
limited he found that his studious 
habits were the foundation of his ac- 
quisition of knowledge in future life. 
He served as a private in the war be- 
tween the states when not disabled, 
and in 1867 was married to Miss P. A. 
Dixon From a boy he had a feeling 
that he would one day become a 
preacher and set about to get religion 
But in this he failed for the Lord 
showed him his sinful nature and 
utter helpless condition, and in Novem- 
ber 1872, he united with the Meadow 
Church in Green County and was bap- 
tized by Elder Jesse Baker He was 
in 1874, ordained as a deacon, li- 
censed to preach in 1879, and ordained 
to the full work in 1881 by Elders J. 
C. Hewit, and L. H. Hardy, and is a 
useful, faithful minister. 



HENRY D. MICKEY. 

Mickey, Elder Henry D., of Pinna- 
cle, N. C., was born in Surry County, 
N. C., April 8, 1849; was of humble 
parentage and one ot a family of 
twelve children. Three short sessions 
was the limit of his school days. His 
motherd was a Methodist and he was 
therefore raised up in that faith, and 
at the age of fourteen united with 
this church but felt no conviction for 
sin or difference in his life. Four years 
later he moved into a neighborhood 
where he came in contact with Primi- 
tive Baptists. He had heard them 
spoken of as a hard set of people hold- 
ing to an unsound doctrine. He at- 
tended their meetings but could not 
understand the preaching until he 
was, by God's spirit, taught his lost 
and ruined condition and given a hope 
of heaven through the atoning blood 
of Jesus, Thus he was led to the 
church, united with those he once 
had no love for, was later ordained 
to the work of the ministry and has 
since been preaching Jesus the, way, 
the truth and the life. 



J AS. F. MILLS. 

Mills, Elder Jas. F., was born in 

Union County, N. C, June G, 1846, 
on the farm where he has lived all his 
life. In his youth he had serious 
tt oughts of eternity and his future 
destiny which followed him, and 
caused him much trouble until the 
second day of September, 1874, when 
he was blest with a hope in Christ as 
his Redeemer. He united with the 
Church April, 1879, began to speak in 
public there in May, 1888, and was 
ordained about two years later. He 
is a very mild and conservative min- 
ister, has traveled some but most of 
his labors have been within the 
bounds of the Bear Creek Association 
and no man stands higher in the es- 
teem of his brethren and friends than 
Elder Mills. His life is one of sobriety, 
humility and willing service. He is 
now, and has been for some fifteen 
or more years Moderator of the Bear 
Creek Association. 



J. D. MIRACLE. 

Miracle, Elder J. D. Brother Miracle 
died February 12 1908. He was born 
in Kentucky and went west in 1865. 
The chief theme of his life was salva- 



176 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



tion by grace, and "amazing grace" he 
constantly sang and talked. Ever re- 
joicing in the grace of God to him he 
shed forth the same on all around, 
and was a kind and loving father to 
all he met. This heaven-born kindness 
and humility made him friends and 
won respect from all he met. In all 
his trials through life his love for the 
church was uppermost, and this leav- 
ened his entire conduct. He was twice 
married and leaves a faithful wife and 
twelve children, two of whom are 
ministers of the gospel. He had lived 
in Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri, 
and had baptized a host of believers, 
his own mother being among the num- 
ber. Many years shall he shine as a 
star in the firmament of Zion, inviting 
us on and upward. 




WM. M. MITCHELL. 

Mitchell, Elder Wm. M. This emi- 
nent servant of God was a son of 
James and Margaret Mitchell; was 
born January 10, 1819, near Chester 
Court House, S. C, had but poor ad- 
vantages of education, though by 
hard study and close application ad- 
vanced far enough in English studies 
to teach public school, which he fol- 
lowed a few years in his early man- 
hood; was convicted of sin when 
about fifteen years old; married to 
Miss Mary E. Taylor, June 2, 1842; 
united with Providence Church Au- 
gust, 1842, and was baptized by Elder 
J. J. Dickson; was before his bap- 
tism wonderfully impressed with thi 
thought that he must preach — the 
Lord leading his mind, when trying to 
pray, to read the 12th chapter of 
Isaiah, and at the fourth verse deeply 



impressing upon his mind the words, 
"You must preach;" preached his first 
sermon eleven months after uniting 
with the church — speaking about two 
hours much to the edification of the 
hearers; was ordained to all the func- 
tions of the gospel ministry July, 
1845 and after more than forty years 
of useful, faithful and exemplary ser- 
vice died at his home in Opelika, Ala., 
February 26, 1901, in his eighty-third 
year of age. Elder Mitchell was for 
many years associate editor of the 
Gospel Messenger, and was one of 
the most able spiritual writers of the 
age. Out of the many published com- 
mendatory remarks of him I append 
the following from the pen of that 
sweet writer S. B. Luckett: "The 
death of Elder Mitchell will be felt 
all over the land, but it is for those 
who knew him best to speak more 
particularly of his personal worth and 
Christian character, while we who 
lived beyond the charm of his voice 
and the sight of his well-ordered steps 
are to trace his goodness, his affec- 
tion, and his love of truth in the writ- 
ten page, as we do in the case of 
Paul and other pensmen of the Lord. 
Before such spiritual excellence and 
moral worth, such heaven-born humil- 
ity and Christian love, the world's 
grandeur and ostentation are a thing 
of nought. We need not ask, who will 
write the memorial of his life or his 
epitaph in death. He needeth no epis- 
tle of commendation from any, for he, 
being dead, yet speaketh, and our edi- 
fied and instructed hearts are the seal 
of his ministry. The spirit of devotion 
and love, and the incense of spiritual- 
ity are in all his writings. His edito- 
rial in the last Gospel Messenger 
would be a monument to any name." 



H. G. MITCHELL. 

Mitchell, Elder H. G., of Nickajack, 
Ga., is moderator of the Marietta Old 
School Baptist Association of Georgia. 
He has the care of Bethlehem and Mt. 
Zion Churches in Cobb County, and 
other churches in this section, and is 
highly esteemed for the truth's sake. 
Particulars of his life and labors could 
not be secured. 



THOMAS MITCHELL. 

Mitchell, Elder Thomas, of Spencer 
Ind., was born in Lawrence County, 
Ind , August 11, 1858, became deeply 
interested on the subject of religion 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



177 



in his seventeenth year, united with 
Spring Creek Baptist Church in his 
twentieth year and was baptized by 
Elder J. H. Oliphant. The work of the 
ministry began to weigh heavily on his 
mind, and he began preaching about 
1895, was ordained July the following 




THOMAS MITCHELL 

year by Elders P. T. Oliphant and F. 
M. Mattox, and has had, since that 
time the care of three churches al- 
most continuously. For about fifteen 
years he has been clerk of the White 
River Association and has proven a 
faithful servant and desires to know 
nothing, in the matter of salvation, 
but Jesus and Him crucified. 



WM. RILEY MITCHELL. 

Mitchell, Elder Wm. Riley, of Mis- 
souri. This minister was born near 
Wilksbu: - g, X. C, and was educated 
there and went to Middle Tennessee 
in his young days. About the year 
1854, he moved to Missouri and served 
churches in this state, but data for a 
full sketch of his life and labors could 
not be obtained. He died about the 
year 1875, while away from home fill- 
ing appointments. 



AMOS MIX. 

Mix, Elder Amos, was born in New 
York in the year 1759. Entered the 
Army of the Revolution from the state 
of New York at the commencement of 
hostilities in 1775, at the age of six- 
teen years and served through the 
seven years. After General Lafayette 



came to the aid of America he was one 
of the general's regiment of picked 
men. When he joined the Baptists 
cannot be stated. The records of the 
Red Stone Association of Western 
Pennsylvania show that he was an 
Elder in the bounds of that Association 
as far back as 1807. Elder Mix was 
a predestinarian and at the time of his 
connection with the Red Stone Associa- 
tion there were inroads being made in 
to the Baptist doctrine, and some were 
arvocating Arminianism, especially 
Alexander Campbell, who joined the 
Baptists in that country in 1812 and 
was excluded from the stand of the 
preachers at Big Red Stone Church, 
Fayette County, Pa., September, 1828. 
And he stood firm against this Armin- 
ian doctrine and had it not been for 
such valiant men Campbell would have 
carried the body of the Association 
with him. As it was however, as 
stated by an eye witness, only one 
elder had the fortitude to follow Camp- 
bell who went about thirty rods to a 
stone that projected above the ground, 
upon which he mounted and harangued 
the excited people for three days. A 
few years after these events occurred 
the "Disciples" of Alexander Campbell 
went to the "sacred spot" and carried 
pieces of the "foundation stone' 'away 
as sacred relics. Elder Mix went to 
Ohio in later years and spent the 
remainder of his life in the bounds of 
the Muskingum Association, and was 
on the side of the Old School when the 
division took place in 1832. He died 
in Muskingum County, Ohio, in the 
year 1846. • — 





SILAS H. MOFFETT. 

Moffett, Elder Silas H., of Paris, 
111., son of Daniel and Lucinda (.Rec- 
tor) Moffitt, who migrated from Far- 



178 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



quier County, Va., about 1831, was 
born in Kentucky August 7, 1828, and 
was Killed by the cars at Kansas, Til., 
June 1, 190G, in tbe seventy-eigbtb 
year of his age. He was carried to 
Illinois by bis parents wben be was 
three years old and lived for about 
seventy-four years a resident of Ed- 
gar County, 111., and helped to re- 
claim the wilderness and wild, fertile 
prairie, and put the land in a high 
state of cultivation. By thrift and 
economy he procured a reasonable 
amount of this world's goods, and left 
his family, all of whom are grown up, 
in comfortable circumstances. He re- 
ceived a hope in early life, and united 
with the Primitive Baptist Church, 
of which he remained a faithful mem- 
ber for over half a century. He began 
his public ministry in 1874, and was 
ordained shortly afterwards,, and the 
Lord blessed his labors to the com- 
fort of many of the Lord's little ones. 
He often said he was content to 
preach about the things he under- 
stood and let the deep and unrevealed 
mysteries remain unmolested, as they 
so often engendered strife when they 
were advocated by others. As a Bible 
student be was perhaps, as well in- 
formed as any man of our denomina- 
tion, for he made the Bible the man 
of his counsel. He loved his brethren 
and always "preached unto them 
Jesus." He preached his last discourse 
Sunday, May 27, at the home of Elder 
James M. True, in Kansas, 111., fol- 
lowing Elder J. G. Sawin; and it 
seemed he realized that his time was 
short, and his soul was filled with 
holy zeal and heavenly light. The 
evening before bis untimely -death he 
walked the porch and sang, "The Un- 
clouded Day." When he started to 
town he said good-bye to his dear 
companion three times, which were 
tbe last words she ever heard him 
utter, as he never regained conscious- 
ness after being struck by the train, 
and only lived two hours. Elder Mof- 
fett was a faithful under-shepherd and 
had the care of churches continuously 
until his death, and was for a num- 
ber of years Moderator of his home 
association. 



MITCHELL B. MOFFETT. 

Moffett, Elder Mitchel B., of Paris, 
111. The subject of this sketch was 
born in Edgar County, 111., May 24. 
1854, and was the second son of Elder 
Silas H. Moffett. The country being 
new and sparsely settled the advant- 



ages of education were far from fav- 
orable, but with a desire to acquire 
at least the rudiments of a practical 
education he succeeded in obtaining 
a teacher's license and for ten years 
taught school in the winter and farm- 
ed in the summer. He was made to 
realize his dependence on God for life 
and salvation in his twentieth year, 
realized an interest in the Saviour's 
love and became impressed with an 
earnest desire to proclaim the un- 
searchable riches of Christ at the 



ilia^ 







MITCHELL B. MOFFETT 

very time he received a hope in the 
Saviour. United with the Primitive 
Baptist Church December, 1873, and 
made his first attempt to speak in 
public March, 1874. But having a 
dread of ever becoming a public 
servant, he withstood, in a measure, 
his impressions to preach, and tried 
to farm and teach as above stated. 
He was married September 9, 1874, to 
Miss Emily K. Redman and together 
they have battled over thirty-four 
years, — she being in every sense of 
the word an helpmete, both naturally 
and spiritually. Elder Moffett has ever 
been content to deal with the revealed 
things in the gospel field and always 
tried to labor for the peace of Zion, 
and is now pastor of Concord Church 
Clark County, 111., where he tried to 
preach when but nineteen years old, 
and he labored here most of the time 
for over thirty-four years. Has also 
the care of other churches and has 
traveled extensively and has been 
well received by the Primitive or Old 
School Baptist every where he has 
gone, and is contented to still con- 
tinue in the good old way, satisfied 
with the goodness of the Lord's house, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



179 



even of his holy temple. He has bap- 
tized nearly two hundred persons, 
married about as many couples and 
preached 2G4 funerals up to the pres- 
ent time — 1908. 



E. P. MOFFETT. 

Moffett, Elder E. P., was born Sep- 
tember 22, 1825, and died January 15, 
1894. He was married to Miss Celia 
Rogers, daughter of Elder Elijah 
Rogers, September 6_ 1846, and joined 
the Primitive Baptist Church at Sul- 
phur Springs, Warren County, Tenn., 
in June, 1850. Elder Moffett was an 
able minister of the gospel. He began 
to preach in 1854, and was sound in 
the doctrine of God our Saviour, and 
in the practice and order of the 
church and was ever a gallant de- 
fender of salvation by grace. The 
churches of the Collins River As- 
sociation will greatly miss him. He 
stood high in his neighborhood as a 
citizen, and was greatly beloved by the 
Baptists everywhere he was known. 




S. B. MOFFITT, 

Moffitt, Elder S. B., of Xewburg, 
Ohio, was born in Randolph County, N. 
C. October, 1857, reared by godly par- 
ents, but cai'ed nothing about the 
church and felt he could get religion 
Avhenever he wanted it, left home at 
the age of seventeen and went to Iowa, 
remaining there twelve years and was 
married to Miss Mary E. Hill, Decem- 
ber 22, 1878, moved to Jewell County, 
Ky., and remained there nine years, 
then selling out and moved to Oregon 



and settled near Newburg where he 
now resides. Before moving to Ore- 
gon he had never heard but one or two 
Primitive Baptist sermons, and cared 
nothing about their doctrine until 
shown in a dream or vision, while suf- 
fering from an attack of typhoid fever, 
the beauty of the church and given a 
sweet hope in Jesus. As soon as able 
to travel he began to hunt for the 
Primitive Baptists and found a small 
band by name of Gale's Creek Church 
about thirty miles from Newburg. Eld- 
er Moffitt and his wife joined this 
church June, 1895, and was baptized 
by Elder Daniel Lilly. He was or- 
dained as deacon the same year and 
ordained to the work of the ministry 
in 1898, by Elders W. S. Matthews. 
Daniel Lilly and J. M. Lawrence, has 
the care of three churches and travels 
considerably among the Baptists of 
Washington and Oregon. 




J. A. MONSEES. 

Monsees, Elder J. A., of Macon, Ga., 
was born August 31, 1883, in David- 
son County, N. C., in which county 
his father still resides. On the 9th 
of May, 1902, an impression of the 
magnitude of his sins and guilt seized 
upon him with great power. With sor- 
rowing heart and soul crushed under 
a burden of guilt and condemnation, 
he often sought solitude where he 
could, secluded from the scrutiny ot 
man, pour out his heart in silent 
prayer to God for saving mercy — not 
justice, until unexpectedly on the 28th 
of August, 1903, the glorious presence 
of Jesus shined radiently and for- 
givingly into his soul, with the sweet 
assurance of a glorious immortality 



180 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



beyond the grave. After such "re- 
freshing from the presence of the 
Lord" his mind, though young and 
tender in years, was directed to the 
Primitive Baptists, and he offered 
himself to Pine Church, Davidson 
County, N. C., September, 1903, was 
received and baptized by Elder W. T. 
Broadway. Two months later — (No- 
vember 7, he was licensed, and in 
November, 1904, was ordained by Eld- 
ers J. A. Burch and W. T. Broadway, 
After his ordination he served Big 
Creek Church, Montgomery County, 
and Pleasant Hill Church, Irdell Coun- 
ty, for two years, and, also, traveled 
quite extensively. Then for nearly 
two years he traveled practically all 
the time, principally in North Caror 
lina, Georgia and Virginia, and during 
his ministry, he has traveled and 
preached in North Carolina, Virginia, 
Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Ken- 
tucky, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri and 
Texas, and has been favorably re- 
ceived by his brethren and sustained 
by the grace of God. His best efforts 
and energies are being put forth in 
the dear cause of Christ and the time 
honored principles of our fathers — 
desiring to know nothing for the sal- 
vation of sinners except Jesus and 
Him crucified, and no practice in the 
church except the practice of Christ 
and His Apostles. 




W, M. MONSES. 

Monses, Elder W. M., of Linwood, N. 
C, is of German descent, his grand- 
parents emigrating from Germany to 
Missouri. He was born in Davidson 
County, N. C, January 4, 1877, raised 
by Baptist parents, convicted of sin 



at the age of twelve years_ received a 
hope in his twenty-fourth year, united 
with the church at Riedsville, N.« C.,, 
January, 1902, and baptized by Elder L. 
H. Hardy. He was, in 1904 married to 
Miss Mary Wallace, ordained in 1905, 
baptized some, assisted in two ordi- 
nations and the constitution of two 
churches. Elder Monses has traveled 
and preached in North Carolina, Vir- 
ginia, Georgia and Alabama and has 
been well received. He is satisfied 
with the church as established by 
Christ and maintained by the Apostles 
and wants no new thing added or any 
of the stakes removed. Elder Monses 
is a brother of Elder J. A. Monses of 
Macon, Ga. • 





JOHN C MONTGOMERY. 

Montgomery, Eider John C, of Illi- 
nois. This lemarkable man died June 
10, 1S91, after a brief illness of six 
days. He was a useful minister of his 
day and served Sangamon Associa- 
tion as moderator for ten years in 
succession. The editor failing to se- 
cure detailed information of Elder 
Montgomery's life and labors will 
quote below an obituary written of 
himself, by himself, April 8, 1901, to 
be read at his funeral: "Elder John 
Montgomery was born 1817 in Wash- 
ington County, Md., was married to 
Sarah Snider January 22, 1839, in 
Pennsylvania, moved to Illinois Octo- 
ber 15, 1848, and located in Sanga- 
mon County. Joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church called Lick Creek in 
July, 1850, and was baptized by Elder 
Wm. Crow together with his wife. 
Tn 1860, he moved to Christian 
County, put letters in the Church 
called Liberty. Liberated by the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



181 



church to exercise his gift in August 
1875, and in July, 1876, was ordained 
to the full work of the gospel." It may 
be of interest to know that he also 
had a double tombstone prepared for 
himself and placed at his wifes grave 
(who proceeded him to the spirit 
world about three years), and had en- 
graved on it: "Sinners Saved by 
Grace." He desired to depart and died 
in the full assurance of meeting her 
with the Saviour. 



J. A. MOORE, 

Moore, Elder J. A., of Wortham, 
Texas. This worthy brother was 
born, January, 1870, in Lauderdale 
County Miss., moved to Texas, with 
his parents in 1883, received a hope in 
Jesus in his fifteenth year and some 
years afterwards united with the New 
School or Missionary Baptists. Be- 
coming dissatisfied, he, two years later, 
left them and after years of conflict of 
mind and trials from without, he united 
with the Primitive Baptists at New 
Hope Church, April, 1897. In 1900 he 
moved to Jones County, Texas, and in 
a short time returned to his old home, 
and was, in October, 1905, ordained 
at New Hope Church' by Elders S. C. 
Kyle, AV. L. Phillips, A. F. Grafton and 
T. J. Moore the last named being his 
father, who baptized him and has for 
more than thirty years been faithfully 
serving in the cause of Jesus. Elder 
Moore is following in the footsteps of 
his aged father, is serving his home 
church and two others, and has this 
year, 1907, traveled over three thou- 
sand miles, partly on foot, preached 
about one hundred times and baptized 
several into the fellowship of his 

churches — ■ ■ — 

ALBERT MOORE. 



Moore, Elder Albert, who many 
years ago died at his home in Grena- 
da, Miss., was born, raised, and bap- 
tized in North Carolina, and at an 
early age in life immigrated to Missis- 
sippi. He was, for a long term of 
years, a very useful minister cf the 
Primitive Baptists, serving many 
churches during his ministry; and 
was for many years Moderator of 
Fountain Creek Association. For want 
of data a suitable sketch could not be 
prepared. 1 — 

ICHABOD MOORE. 

Moore, Elder Ichabod, a son of Wil- 
liam Moore, was a soldier in the Mexi- 
can war and a useful minister among 



the Baptists. He was born in Wilson 
County, N. C, April 10, 1793, convicted 
of sin and given a sweet hope in Jesus 
in his eighteenth year, united with the 
Meadow Church Green County, 1821, 
and was baptized by Elder Thomas 
Dupree. He was, in the same year or- 
dained to the work of the ministry by 
Benjamin Dupree and Samuel Moore. 
In 1832 he with others, constituted the 
church at White Oak, Wilson County 
and was pastor of this churh until his 
death. Was also pastor of Toisnot, 
- Black Creek and Tyson Churches. Eld- 
er Moore was strong in the faith, pure 
in life and brought up his children in 
the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord. One of his sons, Elder A. J. 
Moore of Whitaker, N. C, is a noted 
minister of the Primitive Baptist 
Church and feels he owes much to the 
faithful life of his father. 



JEREMIAH MOORE. 

Moore, Elder Jeremiah, was born in 
Prince William County, Va., June 7, 
1746, united with Chappawamsick 
Church and was baptized by Elder D. 
Thomas. This old church was for a 
long time served by John Clark. Her 
present pastor is J. T. Alexander. Eld 
er Moore was soon after baptism, or- 
dained to preach and during his long- 
service in the Master's vineyard, under- 
went much persecution. Three times 
he was arrested for preaching. Once 
he was placed in jail in Alexandria for 
this offence, but God was with him in 
all of his trials, delivered him and 
blessed his labors to the upbuilding 
of his spiritual kingdom. He traveled 
and preached in many northern and 
southern states but his labors were 
principally confined to Virginia and 
Maryland. He died at a ripe old age 
in the full triumph of faith 



A. J. MOORE. 

Moore, Elder A. J. This gifted and 
successful Primitive Baptist minister 
is a native of North Carolina and re- 
sides at Whitakers. He was born Jan- 
uary IS, 1837, educated at Wilson, Ox- 
ford, and the Cniversity of North Car- 
olina; left college in 1861 to enter the 
Confederate service; at first joined 
the Orange Light Infantry and when 
this company was disbanded, he went 
home and organized a company in 
Pitt, Wilson and Green counties which 
did faithful service as Co. F in First 
Regiment until the war closed. Capt. 



182 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Moore was wounded in a charge be- 
fore Battery Wagener, August, 1863, 
was in hospital several months and 
afterwards sent home, where he was, 
January, 18G4, married to Miss Eliza- 
beth Farmer to whom he had been 
engaged for some years. Upon his re- 
covery he returned to his post and 
proved a faithful, fearless officer un- 
til the fateful day at Appamattox. 
Capt. Moore, after being under con- 
viction for sin about seven years, 
united with the church at Wilson, N. 
C, 1870. baptized by Elder R. D. Hart 




A. J. MOORE 

and ordained by Eiders P. D. Gold and 
B. P. Pitt, December, 1873. The fol- 
lowing clipping from the Gospel Mes- 
senger of 1907, written by Elder S. 
Hassell, gives a record of Elder 
Moore's life and labors. Elder Hassell 
says of him: "The most gifted and 
successful Primitive Baptist pastor 
that I know of in the United States 
was established in the doctrine of 
God our Saviour before he had a hope 
in Christ; was wounded by a bullet 
in the elbow of his right arm during 
the War between the States; and that 
arm has been bent almost at a right- 
angle ever since; has had beautiful 
and wonderful visions in exact accord- 
ance with the Scriptures, and that 
have been fulfilled in his life; has 
been a farmer and a teacher; has 
reared one of the most gentle, upright, 
intelligent, and useful families of nine 
children to be found anywhere; is a 
fine gentleman of the old school; has 
served four churches every Saturday 
and Sunday, except one or two, foi 
about thirty years, going on the trains 
and riding in his own conveyance 
from twenty to thirty miles; is a 



sweet singer; fervent in prayer; an 
excellent doctrinal, experimental, and 
practical preacher, speaking clearly, 
ably, fluently, and eloquently from the 
heart to the heart; is a burning and 
a shining light; a sheep-finder and 
sheep-feeder; a discerner of spirits; 
an abie disciplinarian; is not afraid 
of the face of clay; but is bold to 
declare, in any presence, what he 
believes the Scriptures teach, and is 
uncompromising in defense of the 
truth; is charming and liberal to his 
ministering brethren who visit him at 
his home and home church; preacnes 
Christ nearly all the time both out of 
and in the pulpit, in the family circle, 
on the public and the private road, 
and everywhere; has built up more 
churches and, I believe, baptized more 
white members than any other Prim- 
itive Baptist preacher that I know of; 
is honored and admired by all who 
know him; has suffered great re- 
proach and persecution on account of 
his indomitable stand for truth and 
righteousness; has been blessed of 
the Lord with health and strength; 
has one of the loveliest home 
churches on earth; has served his 
churches so constantly that he has 
made but few and short preaching 
tours away from them; has received 
very little financial help from his 
churches; has no confidence whatever 
in modern religious inventions; never 
sent any of his children to a Sunday 
school; has never held a protracted 
meeting, nor had an organ in one of 
his churches; depends upon the pure, 
sweet, old-fashioned gospel cf Christ 
alone to attract the subjects of grace; 
has been my most intimate friend for 
about xiity years; and has been, for 
about thirty years, the beloved and 
faithful pastor of Kehukee Church, 
near Scotland Neck, Halifax County, 
N. C, the 'Mother Church of the Moth- 
er Association of the Primitive Bap- 
tist Associations of the United States. 
He is no hireling, but a true under- 
shepherd who cares for all the flock, 
instead of scheming and laboring to 
get their fleece for himself; he is an 
eminently self-sacrificing and gracious 
and gifted and successful minister of 
Jesus Christ. He has been greatly 
blessed of the Lord, who has made 
him a great blessing to his family, his 
churches, his community, and the 
world, for which the Lord be praised. 
If all our ministers were like him, 
they would need no heathen or Jewish 
or modern religious inventions to 
maintain or increase the number of 
their members." 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



183 




JOHN H. MOORE. 



Moore, Elder John H., was born in 
Middletown, Tenn., June 29, 1817. He 
moved to Illinois in early life, united 
with the Old School Baptists in 
Green County, Ills., in the year 
1842, commenced preaching in No- 
vember, 1844, and was ordained 
to the ministry in the year 1851; 
moved to Missouri in the year 1857, 
and was one of the pioneer preach- 
ers of that country. Some time dur- 
ing the Civil war when confusion 
and distress reigned in Missouri, he 
went back to Illinois. He returned 
to Missouri after the war and made 
that his home the remainder of his 
life and proved to be one of the most 
self-sacrificing O. S. Baptist preach- 
ers. He attended one church as pas- 
tor for one year that was forty miles 
from his home and walked the entire 
distance both ways. He was always 
poor in this world's goods but rich in 
faith, as his fidelity to the cause of 
truth asserts. One time desiring to 
attend an association one hundred 
miles away, and having no other way 
of getting there, he walked the entire 
distance. He was a man that labored 
with his hands but was not a suc- 
cessful manager, so that he never 
accumulated much property. His mind 
was ever engaged on the subject of 
salvation by the grace of God. He was 
never too busy to talk of the good- 
ness of God towards poor sinners. His 
enjoyment on earth was the company 
of God's saints. His preaching was as 



the honey in the honey-comb — ex- 
perience and doctrine combined — full 
of marrow and fatness. He preached 
as long as he was able to travel. The 
last few years of his life infirmities 
kept him at home, and sad to state, 
he was much neglected by his breth- 
ren in his old days after his labor of 
love was done. This should never be 
the case, but our old ministers should 
be cared for. The testimony of such 
faithful laborers as Elder 'Moore, who 
pass through this earth surrounded 
with trials, troubles and disappoint- 
ments, yet have an eye single unto 
the glory of God, shall endure when 
the earth and its contents are de- 
stroyed. He died January 23, 1905, in 
his eighty-eighth year. 




SAMUEL MOORE. 

Moore, Elder Samuel, son of David 
and Arsena Moore, was born February 
24, 1839, on a farm in Pitt County, N. 
C, and lived and died there, Sunday, 
November 6, 1904^ in his sixty-sixth 
year. He was married December 7, 
1865, to Nancy Ward, daughter of Luke 
and Mahala Ward. Experiencing con- 
viction for sin and a hope in Christ, he 
related the exercises of his soul to the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Great 
Swamp, in Pitt County, N. C. and was 
received for membership and baptized 
in July, 1871; and after exercising as a 
licentiate for some years, he was or- 
dained in July, 1884, to the full func- 
tions of the gospel ministry. He was 
pastor, for several years, of Great 
Swamp Church and of Cross Roads 
Church in Edgecombe County, N. C. 
He was a humble < sincere, wise, tender, 
faithful servant' of Christ and His, 



184 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



people, esteeming spiritual far above 
natural things, and choosing rather to 
suffer affliction with the people of 
God than to enjoy the pleasures of 
sin. He died of malarial fever termi- 
nating in apoplexy; and even in his 
unconscious moments, he would be 
talking, singing, preaching and pray- 
ing with his brethren. 




SPENCER F. MOORE. 

Moore, Elder Spencer F., of Hayden, 
New Mexico, was born February 17, 
1864, in Saline County Illinois, and 
moved with his parents to Kansas in 
the year 1875, where he first felt trou- 
bled under conviction for sins and so 
continued until April 14, 1883, when 
he was given a good hope of salvation 
through grace. From that happy hour 
he has felt impressed to preach the 
glad tidings of eternal life thrpugh 
Christ. In 1S90 he united with the 
Primitive Baptists at Greenwood, Col- 
orado, and was baptized by Elder J. 
R. Bolinger; moved to Southwest Mis- 
souri in 1891, where he two years 
later made his first effort to preach. 
Since that time he has delivered more 
than two thousand discourses. He was 
ordained February, 1896, in Bibb Coun- 
ty, Ala., by Elder R. F. Papasan, J. 
D. McElroy and W. S. Brown. Elder 
Moore has traveled thousands of 
miles in many states preaching Jesus 
without a money consideration. He 
writes: "My travels among the saints 
have been most blessed to me and I 
will ever cherish the fond memory of 
their kindness; and while I have en- 
dured hardships and grief in many 
ways, I should have cause of shame 
to murmur, since our precious Saviour 



sorrowed, and wept, and bled and 
died, — a spotless sacrifice for the res- 
cue and salvation of his poor lost 
sheep." 



CLAYTON MOORE. 

Moore, Elder Clayton (1814-1881), a 
native of Martin County, N. C, was 
one of the ablest ministers of the New 
Testament during the nineteenth cen- 
tury. In 1840 he was married, and 
joined the Methodists, and was li- 
censed to preach, and began a circuit; 
but, being a diligent student of the 
Bible, he became satisfied before the 
end of the same year, of the great 
truths of God's sovereignty and pre- 
destination and election, and with- 
drew from the Methodists, and soon 
afterwards joined the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Picot, of which he be- 
came and remained pastor till his 
death. He had a clear profound mind, 
improved by careful reading and re- 
flection, and was a safe counsellor, an 
interesting speaker and well-ground- 
ed in the doctrine of salvation by 
grace. On his death bed, when his 
strength was fast failing, his son, Jas. 
E. Moore, a member of his church and 
prominent lawyer of Wlilliamston, N. 
C, knelt beside his bedside and asked 
him if his Christian hope was as 
bright and strong as ever, and receiv- 
ed the answer: "Oh, yes, I know in 
whom I have trusted;" and the dying 
servant of God began to talk of the 
reality and certainty of the Christian's 
hope and life beyond this, and con- 
tinued to talk until his speech became 
inaudible, his last audible words be- 
ing: "The counsel of peace." He then 
quietly fell asleep in Jesus. 



DAVID R. MOORE. 

Moore, Elder David R, This highly 
esteemed minister was born March 
20, 1821, in Person County, N. C, and 
died April 23, 1900. He was concerned 
about his sins from his earliest recol- 
lection. At the age of thirty years he 
obtained a hope in Christ Jesus, went 
before the church at Flat River, June, 
1857, and related the dealings of the 
Lord with his soul, and was received 
and baptized and remained a member 
of this church until the day of his 
death. He was ordained November, 
1860, and while he lived he never dis- 
graced his holy calling. He was 
unanimously called as pastor at Flat 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



185 



River Church in November, 18G5, 
where he remained pastor until his 
death — an under-shepherd, going in 
and out, preaching the word, ever 
warning the church against evil and 
sin, exhorting them to duty, and to 
let brotherly love continue, contend- 
ing for salvation by grace, and grace 
alone, election and foreknowledge of 
God. He was Moderator of the Coun- 
try Line Association for a number of 
years, which place he filled with hon- 
or, and was a father in Israel — 'indeed, 
a faithful witness, earnestly contend- 
ing for the faith once delivered to the 
saints. He was sound in doctrine, firm 
in the faith, and bore the marks of 
Jesus, was one of the most successful 
and most beloved pastors in the 
Country Line Association. The 
churches he served were generally 
blessed with peace, and when they 
needed advice they sought it of their 
pastor, and were among the most 
prosperous churches in the associa- 
tion. 




W. B. MORGAN. 

Morgan, Elder W. B., cf Lafayette, 
Ala., was born in Randolph County, 
June 26, 1874. His parents were Mis- 
sionary, or New School Baptists, and 
he was taught their doctrine and prac- 
tice. He was raised up to hard la- 
bor and had poor opportunities to 
obtain an education. In his fifteenth 
year he was convicted of sin, Two 
years later he experienced deliverance 
united with the New School Baptists 



and was impressed with the duty of 
preaching Jesus. But feeling too 
young and insufficient in many ways 
he kept this impression a secret. He 
had heard many hard things said 
about the Primitive or Old School 
Baptists, but it was 1892 before he 
heard one preach. He was at onct 
interested. The preaching was sweet 
to him because it was in harmony 
with his own feelings. Though he 
tried to remain satisfied with his own 
people he could not. He was equally 
unable to forget the Primitive Bap- 
tists and found himself loving them 
more and more, and in June, 189G, he 
united with them, though in doing so 
he had to meet much opposition 
from those of his former connection, 
even his parents opposing his course. 
But God had a work for him to do. 
After much drawing back on his part 
and the afflicting rod sent upon him 
he was made willing to preacn Jesm 
and was ordained December, 1902. 
Since then he has baptized his father, 
mother, brother and sister, and more 
than a hundred others into the fel- 
lowship of the church. He has the 
care of four curches and his labors 
are being blessed of the Lord. 



DANIEL M. MORGAN. 

Morgan, Elder Daniel M., was born 
in Overton County, Tenn., 1809, in 
1827 was convinced that he was a 
helpless sinner, in 1832 obtained a 
hope in Christ in Franklin County, 
Mo., in 1835 joined the Baptist Church 
in Jackson County, Tenn., and in 1842 
commenced to preach Jesus the truth 
the way of life. He was an eye wit- 
ness to many of the troubles among 
the Baptists in consequence of the 
efforts cf modern missionism; and 
said in a published letter sometime 
before his death, "In order that no 
person may be deceived I frankly con- 
fess myself to be one of those char- 
acters who feel it their duty to defend 
that unpopular doctrine called pre- 
destination and election, contending 
that salvation is entirely of grace, and 
that practical godliness is the fruit 
of the operation of God." Elder Mor- 
gan was a bold defender of the truth 
in Jesus as he saw it and was faith- 
ful until the end. 



A. B. MORRIS. 

Morris, Elder A. B., of Oxford, 
Miss., was born near Lexington, 
Holmes County, Miss., in 184G, reared 



186 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



by Primitive Baptist parents, given a 
common rural school education, and 
was early exercised in mind about his 
future destiny, and after nine years of 
great mental distress he was given a 
good hope in Christ as his all suf- 
ficient and merciful Saviour. This oc- 
curred in 1SG3. In 1866 he united with 
the Primitive Baptists. From the time 
he was given a hope in Christ he felt 
deeply moved by a power he did not 




JOHN M. MORROW. 

Morrow, Elder John M., the subject 
of this sketch, was born April 
3. 1848. At the age of three years 
his father died and he was rais- 
ed by a widowed mother who was 
a woman of, far more than average 
ability, a strict disciplinarian, and 
true Primitive Baptist. At an early 
age he was convicted of sin and af- 



A. B. MORRIS 

resist and felt he could not over- 
come to preach Jesus, and soon began 
exercising in the church by introduc- 
ing services and some times speaking 
a few minutes. He was ordained in 
1870 by Elders E. A. M,eaders, M. C. C. 
Maples and J. Castleberry, and has 
since had the care of four churches 
in the bounds of the Hopewell Asso- 
ciation. He has been a member of this 
association thirty-nine years and has 
attended every session, to the present, 
and has for many years been serving 
this association as Moderator. Elder 
Morris has traveled and preached in 
most of the Southern states, is a 
strong preacher, and his labors are 
being blessed of the Lord to the good 
of His people. 



ter much sorrow of mind was deliver- 
ed of the burden, given a hope in 
Jesus, and united with Sandy Branch 
Church, Weakly County, Tenn., 1878. 
Soon after this he moved to Texas 
and was there ordained to the minis- 
try. A full sketch of his labors could 
noc be obtained. 



A. G. MORTON. 

Morton, Elder A. G., of Albermarle, 
N. C., was born in Stanley County, N. 
C, July 13, 1864, convicted of his lost 
condition on account of sin in 1876 — 
and was in deep grief and trouble till 
1886, when the Lord spoke peace to 
his troubled soul and after then he 
had a strong desire to follow Christ in 
baptism, and becoming established in 
faith that the Primitive Baptists were 
the Apostolic church of Christ he 
joined at Jones Hill in 1887. A few 
years after this he was ordained, and 
is an able and sound preacher. His 
labors are blessed much to the com- 
fort of the church. Elder Morton is 
physically a very delicate man, yet 
besides serving the churches he has 
a mercantile business and a flarm and 
is a man of energy and industry. He 
has never traveled very extensively, 
perhaps on account of his secular 
business, but is gladly received wher- 
ever he does go. , 



JOHN GREEN MURRAY. 

Murray, Elder John Green (1832- 
1899) fourth son of Elder James Mur- 
ray, was born in Houston County, Ga.,. 
married to Miss Ellenora Yelverton 
in 1858; baptized at the church where 
he was buried, by Elder John Rowe, 
August, 1869; was liberated to preach 
May, 1870; and ordained to the full 
work of the ministry September, 1872, 
Elders J. Murray, J. R. Respess and 
John Rowe serving as the presbytery. 
He was always ready to go where duty 
called in sickness, in health and in cold 
and rain, esteeming no privation too 
great when he felt he could profit any 
who were in need of his service. 
When other preachers were called on 
to go to funerals, marriages, and to 
see the sick, or comfort some one in 
sorrow, or to attend ordinations and 
constitution of churches, and did not 
feel like going, Brother Murray was 
always looked to as a sure substi- 
tute. Although feeble of body and poor 
in this world's goods, nothing but a 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



187 



physical impossibility turned him 
back. He never seemed to consult his 
own convenience or comfort but that 
of others who needed his presence. He 
was peculiarly gifted in explaining 
points in his preaching by plain, sim- 
ple illustrations, and was one of the 
few who could bring out, and apply to 
Christian experience, the facts of the 
Old Testament, which are to so many 
sealed, and without signification. Bro. 
Murray was the Moderator of Upatoie 
Association for many years, and a 
faithful minister of Jesus for twenty- 
nine years. 



J. M. MURRAY. 

Murray, Elder J. M., of Ellaville, Ga. 
This able minister of the New Testa- 
ment is the beloved Moderator of the 
Upatoie Association of Primitive Bap- 
tists, and the faithful pastor of Phil- 
lipi, Good Hope and Mt. Nebo 
churches, and the editor regrets that 
a more complete sketch of his life and 
labors could not appear. 



M. K. MYATT. 

Myatt, Elder M. K., of Clinton, Ky., 
was born in Dickson County, Tenn., 



December 29, 1838. In youth he was 
convicted of sin and set about to bet- 
ter his condition, and while under the 
law, trying to establish his own right- 
eousness, was impressed with the duty 
of preaching, but felt determined that 
if he ever did, he would not preach 
the old despised doctrine of grace, but 
the doctrine of the Methodist or Pres- 
byterians. Soon after this God blessed 
him with eyes to see himself as he 
was, and he now loved this doctrine 
but felt unworthy a place in the 
church. He was, in 1876, made willing 
to offer to the Baptists for member- 
ship and was baptized into their fel- 
lowship. Immediately after uniting 
with the church he was deeply im- 
pressed to preach Jesus, and after 
drawing back and feeling the afflict- 
ing hand of God he was made willing 
to be anything in the church, — was 
soon ordained and has since proven a 
true, faithful soldier on the walls of 
Zion. Elder Myatt is a farmer, and, 
like Paul would not be a burden to 
the church, but prefers to labor with 
his own hands when not doing minis- 
terial work. May his brethren appre- 
ciate his labors, love him for the 
work's sake and minister unto him of 
their carnal things, freely. Elder 
Myatt is associate editor of Zion's 
Advocate. 



Mc 



SAMUEL McBEE. 

McBee, Elder Samuel, was one of 
the members in the organization of 
Union Church, afterwards called 
Sweetens Cove, Marion County, Tenn., 
which was organized in October, 1821. 
He was a deacon and was ordained 
minister in 1823, was chosen pastor in 
1824 and served in that capacity for 
a number of years. Some time later 
he moved to Dade County, Ga., and 
became a member of New Providence 
Church near Trenton. He was mar- 
ried twice and reared a large family. 
He was Moderator of his association, 
Sequachee Valley, as late as 1861, and 
died in the early '60's at a ripe old 
age, having been born some time near 
the close of the Revolution. Elder Mc- 
Bee was considered by the Old Bap- 
tists of his day an able and strong 
defender of the doctrines of the Bible. 
Old people who remember him praise 
him highly as a man. It is said that 
his wife taught him to read and write 



when he began to preach, it. is related 
of him that on one occasion some 
learned man had heard him preach, 
and supposing from his language that 
he had special theological training, 
asked him what college he had at- 
tended. He replied, "Bush College." 
The man said he had never heard of 
that college and asked where it was. 
Elder McBee replied "In the bushes 
on my knees." 



J. R, McCARTY. 

McCarty, Elder J. R., of LaCross, 
Okla. This brother received a hope in 
the Saviour in his seventeenth year, 
and flrom that time had an impression 
to preach Jesus to others as the way, 
the truth and the life. He was baptized 
by Elder R. A. Biggs and encouraged 
by him to go forward in duty's way. 
Though young in the ministry he man- 
ifested a deep interest in the peace 



188 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



and prosperity of Zion and contends 
earnestly for the faith once delivered 
unto the saints. 




JAS. W. McCLANAHAN. 

McClanahan, Elder Jas. W., of Lan- 
ham, W. Va., was born August 20, 
1S51, convicted of sin in 1880 and for 
about two years was in darkness, but 
in 1882 he was given a sweet hope in 
Jesus and made to feel he would 
never have more trouble. But in this 
he was mistaken for he was impressed 
with the duty of preaching Jesus to 
others, and viewing himself so un- 
qualified for such a calling he was 
again in distress of mind, and for 
eight years he fought against the 
promptings of duty to unite with the 
church and speak of the Saviour of 
sinners. He joined the Baptists in 
1890, and was baptized by Elder W. 
A. Melton. Three years later he was 
ordained to the gospel work. He has 
traveled and preached in several 
states and desires to know nothing 
but Jesus and Him crucified for the 
salvation of sinners. His churches are 
being blessed of the Lord under his 
faithful ministry. 



G. B. McCLANAHAN. 



McClanahan, Elder G. B., of West 
Virginia, was born August 20, 1851, 
united with the Old School Baptists, 
and in 1906 was ordained to the gos- 



pel ministry by Elders A. H. Ham- 
mond, J. W. Wyatt and J. H. Terry. 
He is able and sound in the faith. The 




G. B. M CLANAHAN 



editor regrets that a fuller sketch 
could not be obtained. 



JOHN McCONNELL. 

McConnell, Elder John, of New York 
City. This able minister of the New 
Testament was born July 31, 1858, in 
Streetsville, Ontario, Canada. Was 
raised and educated under Methodist 
influences, and until the age of twen- 
ty-eight years contended for that doc- 
trine. But the Lord became his teach- 
er, convicted him of sin, gave him a 
sweet hope in Jesus and a love for 
His cause and on September 5, 1886, 
he was baptized by Elder Wim. J. Pur- 
ington in the fellowship of the Old 
S'chool Baptist Church at Hopewell, 
N. J. Several years later he was dis- 
missed to the watchcare of the Salem 
Church in Pniladelphia, and thence to 
the Ebenezer Church in New York 
city. On June 6, 1899, he was ordained 
by the latter church to the full work 
of the gospel ministry. The following 
year he accepted the pastoral care of 
that church, in which relationship he 
still continues. Elder McConnell is a 
faithful and earnest contender for the 
faith once delivered unto the saints, is 
satisfied with the order of God's house 
and desires not to take from or add 
thereto. He seldom travels and there- 
fore is little known away from home, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



189 



but is greatly loved by his brethren 
and highly esteemed wherever he is 
known, and the editor regrets that a 




JOHN M'CONNELL 

more extended notice of his life and 
labors cannot appear. 



J. G. McCORD. 

McCord, Elder J. G., of Dothan, Ala. 
This minister was raised under Metho- 
dist influences, taught their doctrine 
and felt that he could make peace 
with God at any time and get religion 
whenever he wanted it. But the Lord 
opened the eyes of his understanding- 
convicted him of sin, led him in a way 
he knew not, gave him a view of the 
church and a love for it. Yet he was 
not obedient to the heavenly vision, 
knew his Master's will but did it not 
and was beaten with many stripes. 
After years of disobedience he in 1871 
united with the Primitive Baptists and 
was baptized by Elder R. W. Carlisle. 
In March, 1884, he was ordained by 
Elders Joel Helm and J. J. Shields 
and has in his preaching known noth- 
ing but Jesus and Him crucified. He 
is satisfied with the old church and 
wants no new doctrine and practice 
introduced to cause division in the 
redeemed family. 



W. J. McCORMACK. 

McCormack, Elder W. J., of Dora, 
Ala., was born in Randolph County, 
December 23, 1847, professed a hope 
in Christ about the year 1877, unitea 



with the Missionary or New School 
Baptists and was by them licensed to 
preach. Becoming dissatisfied with 
their doctrine and practice, he, in 
about three years afterward, left them 
and joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church, and was baptized into the fel- 
lowship of Sardis Church 1880 by 
Elder John M. Barton. In 1882 
he was ordained to the full ministerial 
work and has been serving churches 
since. Elder McCormack has a fam- 
ily of ten children and while trying to 
serve the church has also wcrked 
hard to support and rear his family, 
proving his love for the cause by his 
labors of faith, love and sacrifice. 



H. R. McCOY. 

McCoy, Elder H. R. (1828-1886), was 

one of the most concise, clear, logical 
reasoners and expounders of the Old 
and New Testaments of his day. His 
careful research, keen analysis, and 
able defense of the teaching of the 
Word of God, and was admired even 
by those who did not agree with 
him on the doctrine of salva- 
tion. He was born in Henry Coun- 
ty, Georgia, entered the Confed- 
erate army 1862, as captain of his 
company, was soon made major of the 
34th Alabama Regiment, and after 
the war served several years in the 
legislature of his adopted state — Ala- 
bama. He first united with the Mis- 
sionary or New School Baptists, but 
soon became dissatisfied with their 
doctrine, as well as things practiced 
by that denomination, and left them 
and joined the Primitive Baptists and 
was baptized by Elder J. G. Edon. In 
May, 1858, he was ordained by Elder 
Moses Gunn, John M. Duke and V. D. 
Whatley, and after a life of zealous 
work and faithful warfare finished his 
course with joy in the triumphs of a 
living faith. 



james Mcdonald. 

McDonald, Elder James This gifted 
and faithful brother lives at Goin, 
Tenn. He was born September 21, 
1829, in Campbell County, moved to 
Indiana in youth and in 1855 profess- 
ed a hope in Christ, united with the 
church the following year and in 1862 
was ordained to the gospel ministry. 
He has traveled and preached in Can- 
ada, and the states of Indiana, Mich- 
igan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and 
Virginia. His first attempt to preach 



190 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



was August, 1860 — using Jno. 19-30 as 
a text, — iand for the past forty-eight 
years he has been preaching a finish- 
ed salvation in Jesus for all the elect. 
Elder McDonald is nearly eighty years 
old but is a strong defender of the 
truths of the gospel, with tongue and 
pen. He is associate editor of the 
"F~otprints of the Flock," and is an 
interesting writer. 




JAS. HAMILTON McDONALD. 

McDonald, Elder Jas. Hamilton, of 
Olympia, Wash., "was born in Aber- 
deen, Scotland, November 1, 1S40, re- 
ceived a hope in Pennsylvania in 1855, 
united with Pisgah Church, Laclede 
County, Mo., in 1870, and was crdain- 
ed in 1872. He served in the Missouri 
legislature in the session of 1874-76, 
is a graduate of the American Medic- 
al College, of St. Louis, Mb., and has 
practiced his profession several years, 
but is at present in the service of the 
U. S. treasury department at Olympia, 
Wash., and preaches when opportunity 
presents." This brief sketch is from 
Elder Cash's book, 1896, and it is with 
regret that the editor failed to secure 
data from which to prepare a more 
complete sketch. 



w. s. Mcdowell. 

McDowell, Elder W. S., was born 
August 2, 1S22, in the county of Hal- 
ifax, Va., and died December 31, 1897. 



When quite a young man he moved to 
Pittsylvania County, Va., and soon 
thereafter became a minister of the 
Baptist Church of which he was a 
member. Elder McDowell was an hon- 
est farmer, labored with his own 
hands for the support of himself and 
those that were with him. He was a 
preacher about forty years and was 
an able defender of the truth and felt 
that he was set for the defense of the 
gospel. No doubt many thought he 
used the sword unmercifully. He glor- 
ied in salvation by grace and felt 
great concern for the welfare of the 
churches, watching closely every in- 
vasion. He was rigil with young 
preachers, but meant it for their 
good and the safety of the churches. 
He endeared himself with his breth- 
ren by his earnest labors for their 
good, and often admonished them to 
be true to the cause of God and truth. 



j. d. Mcelroy. 

McElroy, Elder J. D., of Pearson, 
Ala., was born January 12, 1857. Both 
parents died when he was about four 
years old and he was raised by his 
grandfather, Deason. When about six- 
teen years old he was given a hope 
in Jesus, united with the New School 
or Missionary Baptists, but feeling 
this was not his home, he about three 
years later, joined the Old School 
Baptists, and was by them ordained to 
the full work of the ministry and has 
been serving four churches most of 
the time since. He is a great lover of 
singing and in his young manhood pre- 
pared himself as a vocal music teach- 
er. For most of the time during the 
past twenty-five years he has served 
Little Hope Association as Modera- 
tor, has assisted in the constitution 
of two churches and the ordination of 
six ministers and several deacons, has 
baptized about seventy-five persons 
and officiated in many marriages, is 
postmaster at his home town and 
proprietor of a mercantile business, 
has reared an industrious and lovely 
family of children, and is a faithful 
minister, but feels that he is too much 
confined bv secular affairs. 



W. J. McGEE. 

McGee, Elder W. J., of Georgia. This 
highly esteemed brother was born 
December 5, 1816, died February 7, 
1896. He was married to Miss Emma 
White on September 4, 1838, and to 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



191 



this union was born eleven children, 
nine still living. These children nearly 
all have large families which make 
up a large number of grand and great- 
grandchildren, number in all about 
ninety. Elder McGee professed a hope 
in Christ and joined the Primitive 
Baptists in his twentieth year and was 
ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry by Elders A. Keeton, and I. L. 
Pennington. This old veteran was in 
the division of the Missionaries and 
Old Baptist; he stood then on the 
Primitive Baptist side and maintained 
the doctrine of God our Saviour and 
continued to preach and practice that 
faith for nearly forty years without 
ever being censured by the church 
for any cause. Always prompt 
in filling his appointments and being 
so very mild in his delivery, he made 
friends wherever it was his lot to go. 
He was also a man that wielded a 
great influence in the way of keeping- 
peace and harmony among the 
churches, and was indeed an under- 
shepherd, sent of the Lord. 




FRANK McGLADE. 



McGlade, Elder Frank, of Hebron, 
O. This gifted preacher was born in 
Warren County, O., July G, 1853; 
christened by a Catholic priest when 
six years old; born again May, 1872; 
baptized into the fellowship of the Old 
School Baptist Church called Sugar 
Creek, at Centerville, Montgomery 
County, O., by Elder John A. Thomp- 
son. Soon after this he was impressed 
with the duty of preaching Jesus to 
others, but rebelled. In regard to this 
trial of his life he writes as follows: 



"The Lord told me to preach but 
I fought against it. He kept on and 
on telling me, morning, noon and night 
and between times. I ran away. He 
followed me, brought me back, said 
'preach the gospel I bid you.' He made 
me willing, made me afraid of Him. 
I'm afraid not to go. I believe from 
experience that God is not only a sov- 
ereign, but his will is absolute. His 
will controls mine." Elder McGlade is 
a strong doctrinal, as well as experi- 
mental preacher. 




F. M. McLEROY. 

McLeroy, Elder F. M. The subject 
of this sketch was born in Clarke, 
now Oconee County, Georgia, Septem- 
ber 18, 1827, and spent his whole life 
in Clarke, with the exception of seven 
years, six of which he lived in Walton, 
and one in Morgan County. He was 
raised by poor parents, and received 
only a limited education. Until he be- 
came of age he worked at various oc- 
cupations, but upon reaching his ma- 
jority, engaged in the milling business, 
in which he spent the prime of his 
life. From his earliest recollection he 
had serious thoughts of lire and death, 
but always considered that he would 
have ample time to look after the 
great questions of eternity when he 
became a man, married, and settled 
down. April, 1847, he was married to 
Miss Sarah Jane Wise, who was, like 
himself, at that time under conviction. 
In three short months she died, leav- 
ing him without a friend in earth or 
heaven, as he expressed it. His life 
was now most desolate. He said of 
himself that he often retired into 



192 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



some secret place, and tried to pray 
to God, and then would prostrate 
himself to the earth, and pray the 
Lord to forgive the sins he had com- 
mitted in trying to pray. But he was 
given a sweet hope in Jesus and in 
October, 1847, united with the church 
at Mars Hill, and was baptized by Eld- 
er George Lumpkin. On the 9th of Sep- 
tember, 1849, he was married to Mass 
Lucinda Edison, who survives him. 
Immediately after joining the church 
he began to be impressed to proclaim 
the glad tidings of salvation, but con- 
tinued in doubt and hesitation for 
about fifteen years. During this time 
he tried in every possible way to rid 
himself of this impression. He would 
use various methods of excusing him- 
self, but became reconciled, and was 
ordained November, 1865, by Elders 
D. Wi. Patman, W. D. Chandler, and 
W. M. Almond. During his ministerial 
labors he served ten churches, some 
of them for many years, baptized about 
200 members, assited in constituting 
four churches, and in ordaining thir- 
teen preachers, and thirty or more 
deacons. According to his own state- 
ment, which seems to me to be very 
modest, lie traveled enough by private 
conveyance to have circled the globe 
three times, besides thousands of 
miles by rail. In 1865 he was chosen 
clerk of the Oconee Association, which 
position he held till elected Moderator 
about 1S85. He was Moderator of this 
Association at his death. 




PHILLIP MclNTURFF. 

Mclnturff, Elder Phillip, of Virginia. 
This faithful servant of God, son of 
David Mclnturff, was born in Powells 



Fort, Shenandoah County, Va., August 
29, 1815, and died in West Virginia, 
August 28, 1886. lacking one day of 
reaching his seventy-first mile-post on 
the road of time. Early in life he heard 
of the strange doctrine, so-called, that 
was being preached by Elder James 
Ireland and determined to hear for 
himself, crossing two mountains in 
order to meet him. Though his father 
became deeply concerned in religion, 
was given a hope in Jesus and was 
baptized by Elder Ireland yet he did 
not until about 1845 make a public 
profession of a hope in the Saviour, 
when he was baptized by Elder W. C. 
Lauck. His conviction for sin was 
deep, his burden of guilt heavy, and so 
cast down was he the night before he 
was enabled to claim a hope in Jesus 
that he fully expected to commit sui- 
cide. But "in man's extremity is God's 
opportunity," and when he came to the 
end of the law expecting to find death 
iie found Christ, and soon began to 
publish salvation to others. Long be- 
fore he had a change of heart or united 
with the church he had an impression 
to preach though he would not, at the 
time, admit it. He began preaching in 
1855. Was soon ordained. Elder W. 
C. Lauck who baptized him and who 
united him in marriage to Miss Cather- 
ine Mauck of Page County, Va., deliv- 
ered the ordination charge. Until he 
became he^less he was a zealous, ac- 
tive and able minister, going far and 
near bearing the blood-stained banner 
of Jesus. He crossed the Allegheny 
mountains one hundred and thirty r -nine 
times on preaching tours, served the 
following churches during life: Mill 
Creek and Hawksbill in Page County, 
and Dry Run, Shenandoh County Va. 
Enon, Great Cacopon and Ten Mile in 
West Virginia; Tonoloway in Mary- 
land ; Meadow Run, Ruff's Creek and 
Red Stone in Pennsylvania, and trav- 
eled considerable in the middle-western 
states. Elder Mclntruff ,, though favored 
with only what is now termed a "log- 
cabin" education, was one of nature's 
noblemen and an able defender of the 
truth as it is in Jesus. After filling an 
appointment in Cincinnati on one occa- 
sion a strange gentleman sent him an 
overcoat with the message, "Any man 
who can preach as you did ought to 
have a new coat," at the same time 
concealing his name. Upon two occa- 
sions he preached in a Methodist 
church in Baltimore much to the grati- 
fication and comfort of a spiritually- 
minded Methodist friend, and to the 
discomfort of the minister in charge. 
Many were the combats this faithful 
man had with Arminians. Some being 
public discussions, and the Baptists 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



193 



felt the cause of truth never suffered 
upon such occasions. He was well es- 
tablished in the doctrine and practice 
of the Apostolic church, and persecu- 
tion could not move him therefrom. He 
was of a cheerful disposition, fond of 
a good joke and made friends where- 
ever he went. His memory is highly 
esteemed among Baptists, especially 
among Baptists of the Shenandoah 
Valley. 




samuel McMillan. 

McMillan, Elder Samuei, was born 
in Cocke County, Term., April 18, 1870, 
reared on a farm by poor parents and 
had but few advantages of an educa- 
tion. He was the oldest of twelve 
children and at the age of seventeen 
God in his infinite wisdom touched 
him with the finger of His love, led 
him by a way he knew not and gave 
him a sweet hope in Jesus. Soon he 
proved his faith by his works, owned 
Jesus before men, united with the 
Primitive Baptists and a few years 
later was ordained to the ministerial 
work. Elder McMillan, has for about 
eleven years been preaching Jesus 
the way, the truth and the life, devot 
ing about three-fourths of his time to 
this labor of love, and is highly es- 
teemed by these who best know him. 



Millan gave to the Primitive Baptist 
Church an evidence of conversion and 
was baptized into the church at Em- 
mens (Flat Creek), and two years 
later in obedience to impressions 
which he felt to be of divine power he 
began preaching, which work he faith- 
fully continued until physical disabil- 
ity utterly prohibited his leaving his 
home. He received his ordination in 
Emmens Church on the first Sunday 
in September, 1874, Elder Jacob 
Young and J. R. Battle constituting 
the presbytery. His life from child- 
hood up to the year 1889 was spent in 
Berrien County. Since that period his 
home was in Colquitt County where, 
as in the county of his nativity, he 
was an honored and useful citizen. 
About fifteen years ago he suffered a 
stroke of paralysis which made him a 
cripple the balance of his life, and for 
the last twelve years his only means 
of locomotion was an invalid's chair, 
being unable for the last four or five 
years of that time to even feed him- 
self, his good wife, who still survives 
him, performing that duty faithfully to 
the last. It can be truthfully said that 
Dan McMillan was conscious of no 
element of selfishness in his religion. 
His simple creed was to trust without 
question an'd the heavier the rod the 
more meekly to bow under the chast- 
ening. 



d. n. McMillan. 

McMillan, Elder D. N. The subject 
of this sketch was born near Alapaha, 
Ga., on December 5, 1844, and died at 
his home in Colquitt County, Febru- 
ary 8, 1908. February, 1870, Elder Mc- 



GEO. W. McNEELY. 

McNeely, Elder Geo. W. (1809-1875), 
of North Carolina. The subject of this 
notice was born in Person County, N. 
C, had early impressions about his fu- 
ture state as a sinner, yet he grew up 
in sin and in love with the vanities of 
this world. But in the year 1828 it 
pleased the Lord to bless the people 
in his and adjoining counties with the 
outpouring of His spirit and to send 
the arrow of conviction to his heart 
as a nail in a sure place, which caused 
him to mourn over his wicked heart. 
At length the Lord was pleased to re- 
move the burden from his heart by 
the light of his countenance and he 
was baptized in fellowship with the 
Church at Upper South Hyco. He was 
soon moved upon in his feelings to 
exhort sinners to repent of their sins 
and seek the Lord. In the year 1830, 
his Church believing his labors were 
blessed of the Lord, he being quite 
backward, the Church licensed him to 
speak in public wherever he might be 
led, and the Lord seemed to direct 
him to Pittsylvania County, Va., and 



194 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



there his labors were blessed 
of the Lord. He continued going there 
monthly for four years. He was timid 
and fearful about engaging in the min- 
istry, and was not ordained until No- 
vember, 1835; he was soon called to I 
take charge of Moon's Creek Church, 
as their pastor. In the fail of 1837, he , 
sold out intending to move West, but j 
visiting the Mayo Baptist Association 
in October, and passing through the 
neighborhood of Matrimony Church, j 
Rockingham County, N. C, when he 
returned home he told his beloved 
wife that if he was called to preach, _ 
that he had seen a peop'e he 
must stay with awhile. So Matrimony j 
Church called him to be their pastor. 
He moved -to that neighborhood in 
1838, and joined Matrimony Church 
by letter, where he continued to labor 
with much ability up to his death. 



a. b. Mcpherson. 

McPherson, Elder A. B., of Clarks- 
ville, Ark., was born in Jackson Coun- 
ty, Ala., August 17, 1830, and moved 
to Arkansas in 1843, where he united 
with the Primitive Baptists, and in 
the year of 1867 was ordained to the 
gospel ministry, and has since had the 
care of churches — having served Mt. 
Gilead in Newton County, Ark., for 
twenty-five years. Elder McPherson, 
has during his ministry, organized 
seven churches, and his labors have 
been blessed to the reviving and edi- 
fication of others; has assisted in the 
ordination of five ministers and sever- 
al deacons and has baptized many be- 
lievers into the fellowship of his 
churches. 



N 




A. H. NAY. 

Nay, Elder A. H., of Moulton, Iowa, 
"'was born in Johnson County, Ind., 
February 1, 1857. He received a hope 
in the year 1875, and joined Bethel 
church, of Primitive Baptists, in In- 
diana, the same year. He is now a 
member of Fox River Church, Davis 
County, Iowa, which liberated him to 



preach in March, 1895. He is a young 
man of good promise." This brief 
sketch is from Elder Cash's book, 
1896, and for want of later information 
is inserted. 



T. M. NEAL. 

Neai, Elder T. M., of Hico, Texas, 
was born in Choctaw County, Miss., 
August 23, 1839, moved toTyler County, 
Texas, when about fourteen years old. 
His father died some time before and 
he became the main support of a wid- 
owed mother. His opportunities for an 
education were few. He became con- 
cerned about his eternal welfare in 
1868, obtained a hope in Christ in 1872 
and united with Primitive Baptists at 
Fellowship Church, Tyler County, 
Texas, 1873. He was soon chosen clerk 
of his church and served until set 
apart to the work of the ministry in 
1878. He has continually had the care 
of churches since, and though suffer- 
ing much from bodily affliction he is 
faithful as a minister and zealous in 
the cause of truth. He preaches sal- 
vation alone by the grace ofl God and 
is satisfied with the church of Christ 
and does not feel that it can be im- 
proved in doctrine or practice. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



195 




D. J. NEAL. 

Neal, Elder D. J., of Duck Hill, 
Texas. This useful minister was bom 
July 24, 1849, raised by Methodist pa- 
rents and taught the principles of 
their doctrine; convicted of sin and 
made to feel his just condemnation 
before God in his twenty-sixth year; 
given a view of Jesus as the Saviour 
of sinners and a sweet hope in Him 
and united with the Methodist Church 
the same year; remained with them 
for four years, during which time he 
read the Bible in search of the marks 
of the Apostolic Church, and becoming 
convinced that the Methodist denomi- 
nation did not bear these marks and 
that the Primitive or Old School Bap- 
tists did, he united with the latter 
and was baptized by Elder Simpson 
Parks in 1879. In this he received 
great peace of mind, but was soon 
burdened with a dispensation of the 
gospel and felt he must preach Jesus 
to others who had been realized so 
precious to him. He was ordained in 
1884 and has since had the service 
of churches besides preaching in des- 
titute places. Two churches have 
been organized under his labors and 
are in a prosperous condition. Elder 
Neal has also for twelve years served 
as a justice of the peace and four 
years as county assessor, which 
shows the confidence placed in him 
by his neighbors. His Godly walk and 
conversation is edifying to others. His 
wife. Mrs. Mattie (Taylor) Neal, is a 
true companion. They have five liv- 
ing children. ' 



J. J. NEAL. 

Neal, Elder J. J., of Clawson, Texas, 
was born at St. Francis, Ark., June 



18, 1857, and died February 17, 1904. 
Brother Neal received a hope in 
Christ in 1871, and united with the 
Methodists; but some years after- 
wards, becoming dissatisfied with 
their doctrine and practice, he left 
and joined the Missionary Baptists, 
but failing to find a home with them 
he left them, and in 1887 he united 
with the Primitive Baptists at Little 
Flock Church in Angelina County, 
Texas, and was baptized the next day 
by Elder E. J. Smith. The church soon 
discovered that he possessed the gift 
ofl. preaching, and therefore licensed 
him to preach in 1890, and soon there- 
after called for his ordination, but he 
refused to submit until he was made 
willing by the power and Spirit of an 
Almighty God, when a presbytery, 
composed of Elders Thomas Britain, 
J. D. Mathews and Z. Oliver was call- 
ed, and he was ordained in 1894. Elder 
Neal, though a great sufferer from 
a complication of diseases, was a 
meek and humble Christian, and an 
able and fearless defender of the doc- 
trine of God our Saviour. 





I. N. NEWKIRK. 



Newkirk, Elder I. N., of Wartsburg, 
Wash., is now in his seventy-fifth year 
of age, but strong in the faith and 
zealous in the cause of truth. He was 
born May 16, 1833, united with the 
church in early life, ordained 1866 to 
the ministerial work and has traveled 
thousands of miles in preaching Jesus 
the way, the truth and the life. The 
blood-stained banner of King Imman- 
uel is the only flag under which he 
desires to march that he might finish 



196 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



his course -with joy. Though growing 
weak in body, Elder Newkirk is strong 
in spirit and glories alone in the fin- 
ished work of Jesus and preaches a 
sure salvation for. all the elect. 




undeserving sinner saved by grace 
occasionally." 



JOSEPH SYLVESTER NEWMAN. 

Newman, Elder Joseph Sylvester, of 
Glen Rose, Texas. This gifted brother 
is an example of what the grace of 
God in the life and heart of a wild, 
reckless sinner does. He was born 
September 23, 1851, and for fifteen 
years was a cow-boy on the plains of 
the West. At seventeen he was mar- 
ried to Miss Mirandy Siemon, convict- 
ed of sin and received a hope in Jesus 
aboui. 1SS0, and when he joined the 
church in Gonzales County, Texas, 
three years later, and was baptized by 
Elder J. W. Baker, he could scarcely 
read and write. Up to the present 
time he has held about fifty public 
discussions with representatives of 
various denominations, and is a 
strong debater and gifted speaker. 
He has never studied anything in the 
preparation of his debates except the 
Bible, church histories and the mean- 
ing of words. Soon after uniting with 
the church he was made deacon, but 
the church soon discovered his gift 
and in 188fi he was ordained by Eld- 
ers J. G. Curington and J. W. Baker. 
He has since spent the most of his 
time traveling and preaching and the 
Lord has blessed his labors. He has 
baptized about five hundred persons. 
His preaching is Jesus, all the waj 
through. In regard to his own feel- 
ings and interest in the sure salva- 
tion of Jesus for all his people Elder 
Newman writes. "I want it printed 
that generations to come may read, 
that if I am saved it will be a poor, 



WM. NEWTON. 

Newton, Elder William (1819-1905), 
was born in Harrison County, W. Va., 
moved with his parents to Ohio when 
a boy, united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Ann Sisk in 1841, (nine children 
were born to them and they lived to- 
gether for sixty-three years), convict- 
ed of sin and found rest in Jesus in 
1852, united with the church called 
Deavertown, the same year, and was 
baptized by Elder Thos. Harper. He 
was soon chosen deacon, and in 1871 
was licensed and a few months later 
ordained to the gospel ministry. 
Though he was too feeble to travel in 
his last years yet his zeal for the 
Master's cause was unabated, and he 
ever stood firm in the faith he so much 
loved. He frequently spoke of the com- 
fort the doctrine of God our Saviour 
was to him, and believed that the doc- 
trine of salvation by grace was the 
only system that would reach a poor 
ruined and lost sinner. On his dying 
bed that system looked so grand and 
sublime to him that he remarked, "Oh 
that I could sound God's praises in 
tones of thunder that all people might 
know the power of His grace." He 
died as he lived trusting in the 
Almighty arm of the Lord for salva- 
tion. — i 




H. W. NEWTON. 

Newton, Elder H. W., of Grain Val- 
ley, Mo., "was born in McMinn County 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



197 



East Tenia., December 14, 1850, and 
moved to Missouri when three years 
old. He united with New Garden 
Church in Ray County, in July, 1874, 
and was ordained in that church in 
December, 1880, since which time he 
has had the care of from one to four 
churches. He has the cause of the 
Master at heart and is careful to 
maintain good works." This informa- 
tion is quoted from Elder Cash's book 
of 1896, in the absence of more re- 
cent data. 




JAS. P. NOBLE. 

Noble, Eider Jas. P., of Deatsville, 
Ala., was born March 12, 18G6. He was 
raised by Primitive Baptist parents. 
His father was a strict disciplinarian 
yet he grew up a wild, wayward boy, 
of which now he is heartily ashamed. 
But God convicted him of sin, led him 
to the Cross where he found relief in 
the Crucified One. He united with the 
church in 1893, and was ordained July, 
1902, and has continuously had the 
care of churches. During the few years 
he has been preaching he has baptized 
nearly a hundred persons and all of 
his churches are in peace. He is de- 
termined to know nothing in his 
preaching but Jesus and him crucified 
and is satisfied with the good old way 
wherein is peace and rest. 



JAMES L. NOBLITT. 

Nobiitt, Elder James L., of Stam- 
per's Creek, Ind., was born in the state 
of Indiana, June 27, 1845, and joined 
the Primitive Baptist Church in the 



year 1875, and was ordained to the 
work of the ministry in 1892, has 
served Young's Creek, Pleasant Grove 
and other churches, and is a worthy 
minister. The editor regrets that a 
suitable sketch of his life could not, 
for want of further information, ap- 
pear. 







A#SJ 


1 






51 


1M^ 

in 






I\ 1 


' ■ ' '■ . 






'■:*;;;;# 





E. A. NORTON. 

Norton, Elder E. A., of Hampton, 
Iowa, was born in Crawford County, 
111 , October 8, 1840, and united with 
Mt. Pleasant Church, Lafayette Coun- 
ty, Wis., in October, 1856. He was or- 
dained to the work of the ministry on 
the fourth Sunday in December, 1895, 
but information relative to the minis- 
terial labors of Elder Norton could not 
be obtained. 



J. W. NORTON. 

Norton, Elder J. W., of Oglesby, 
Texas, was born in Tennessee, Sep- 
tember 14, 1833; professed a hope in 
Christ in August, 1854; baptized in 
October, 1S56, by Elder John B. Hud- 
leston, and began preaching in 1865. 
He served faithfully four years in the 
Civil war, and was twice wounded — 
once in the hand and once in the 
head. Elder Norton was a brother of 
Elder J. A. Norton of Washington, 
D. C, and like him was noted for his 
zeal in the Master's vineyard and 
loyalty to the cause of truth. He 
fought a good fight and finished his 
course with joy April 16, 1909. Elder 



198 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



S. A. Paine says of him: "While I 
would not dare claim perfection in 
the flesh for him but I do believe that 
in all my acquaintance with him that 
I observed as near a perfect life as is 
possible for man. His individual ex- 
cellence was a great help to him in 
faithfully and efficiently meeting the 
duties enjoined upon him in his many 
relations to this life. He was a man 
(an exception to the common rule) 
that always spoke and acted from 
principle and not impulse, his steps 
were always taken soberly, deliberate- 
ly and faithfully. Never did I know his 
zeal (which was steadfast) to culmi- 
nate in rashness or excitement but 
was always so tempered with his 
strong and steady mind that it was 
resolved into a common blessing to all 
concerned. As a neighbor, citizen, hus- 
band, father, brother and as a servant 
of the Lord — in short in all his rela- 
tions and duties of life, his ncble ex- 
ample will live in the hearts of those 
thus related to him, as a living me- 
mento to his grateful memory." 




A. J. NORTON. 

Norton, Elder A. J., of Hampton, 
Iowa, "was born in Kentucky, 'March 
13, 1818, and united with the Primitive 
Baptists March 26, 1837. He was or- 
dained in the year 1852, and has trav- 
eled much in many states. He has the 
care of one church at present, though 
nearly four score years old." This 
notice is from Elder Cash's book 189G, 



and it is with regret that full partic- 
ulars of Elder Norton's life and labors 
could not be obtained for this work. 





J. A. NORTON. 

Norton, Elder J. A., of Washington, 
D. C, was born May 9, 1840, in Tippah 
County, Miss., raised on a farm by his 
parents, William and Sophia Norton, 
who had a family of eleven children; 
convicted of sin in early manhood and 
later in life was given a hope in the 
Saviour, united with the Primitive Bap- 
tists, and was ordained in 1867 to the 
work of the gospel ministry. In his 
young manhood — when just twenty- 
one years of age — he entered the 
Southern army, and nine scars from 
wounds attest his faithful service and 
the great mercy and providential care 
of a covenant-keeping and ever-reign- 
ing God. Soon after this dreadful 
struggle in which he laid down his 
arms at Appomattox, C. H, Va., 1865, 
he entered the public service of an- 
other leader — One who has never and 
can never, suffer defeat, and for forty- 
two years he has been a faithful serv- 
ant. Twenty-six years of his early min- 
istry were spent in Mississippi and 
Texas, in serving and constituting 
churches. For the past sixteen years 
his labors have been . among the 
churches in Virginia. Elder Norton is 
moderator of the Ketocton Associa- 
tion, is a fellow laborer with Elders 
Dalton and Waters, and is faithful, 
zealous and untiring in his services 
in the cause of truth. He feels he has 
met with much opposition, but not so 
much as Jesus, — has passed through 
many perils but not as many as Paul, — 
and desires to thank God, for living 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



199 



in a period of the world's history when 
God's children can witness for Him 
without open persecution and can 
worship under their own vine and fig 
tree and none dare molest or make 
them afraid. He is satisfied with the 
order of God's house as he found it 



nearly half a century ago, and con- 
tends that the Scriptures thoroughly 
furnish God's people with every good 
word and work so that they need 
no new doctrine or practice unau- 
thorized in the Master's Guide-Book. 



o 




W. T. OAKS. 

Oaks, Elder W. T., of Dry Fork, Va. 
This minister, whose labors have 
been confined mostly to the bounds of 
the Stauton River Association, was 
born January 30, 18G2, convicted of sin 
and made to feel his lost and ruined 
condition in his eighth year cf age, 
delivertd from this fear and given a 
hope in the Saviour and united with 
the Missionary Baptist Church in 1888, 
remained with them about seven years 
when he united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church in 1895, commenced 
preaching a few years later and in 
1903 was ordained to the gospel work 
by Elders T. N. Walter, G. W. Hunt- 
ley, J. P. Johnson and C. D. Bray. 
Elder Oaks was soon called to the 
care of the following churches, viz: 
White Thorn, Weatherford, Banister 
and Springfield ; has baptized about 
fifty, married about as many couples, 
assisted in several ordinations, etc., 
and desires to serve the Lord's hum- 
ble poor in such a way as to benefit 
them and glorify God. 



E. C. OAKES. 

Oakes, Elder E. C, of Danville, Va., 
was born April 27, 1872, united with 
the church in his twenty-first year of 
age and was baptized by Elder James 
S. Dameron. For four years before 
uniting with the church he had a 
sweet hope in Jesus, but delayed tak- 
ing up the cross, waiting and hoping 
for more evidence that he was a child 
of grace. Soon after his baptism he 
was licensed to preach and in 1901 
was ordained. About this time he 
moved to Danville and with others 
organized a church in that city Sep- 
tember, 1902. He has since served 
this church as pastor. In 1892 Elder 
Oakes was married to Miss Rosie 
Hines who was at that time a member 
of the Missionary or New School Bap- 
tist Church, but who has since been 
baptized into the fellowship of the 
Primitive Baptists by her husband. 



F. L. OAKLEY. 

Oakley, Elder F. L. (1828-1908), of 
North Carolina, after a long and use- 
ful life fell asleep in Jesus in his 
eightieth year of age. He had been 
preaching nearly fifty years and was a 
faithful minister of Jesus and highly 
esteemed by the churches that knew 
him. The editor regrets that his efforts 
to obtain data for a suitable sketch 
proved in vain. 



JOHN H. ODEN. 

Oden, Elder John H. (1800-1892), of 
Alabama, joined the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church in early manhood and was 
a faithful minister of the gospel for 
fifty-one years, ever contending 
for the faith that was once deliv- 
ered to the saints, and working 
for the peace of the church; prompt to 



200 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



his duty and call as a minister, never 
flinching from heat or cold, rain or 
dry, and was a faithful and kind hus- 
band, a devoted and indulgent father. 
He was born in Talladega County, Ga., 
and moved to Blount County, Ala., 
with his parents in his infancy. He 
first married Miss Clarinda Welsh, 
and after her departure he married 
Mrs. Harriet E. Wilson. He was wide- 
ly known and loved by many, and left 
a good example. He was in the split, 
in 1827-35 and was unmovable from 
the cause of Christ, and His Church 
earnestly contended for the old land- 
mark the church that Christ founded 
upon the rock. He was for many years 
Moderator of the Tombigby Associa- 
tion. 



ARCHIBALD ODOM. 



Odom, Elder Archibald, of Georgia, 
was born in the year 1796, and died 
July 17, 1873, united with Bethsada 
Church in early life and was soon or- 
dained to the ministry. In 1837 he was 
dismissed by letter and went into the 
constitution of Providence Church the 
same year remained a member 
and preached for this and other 
churches until his death. For about 
fifty-five years he was a faithful ser- 
vant in the Master's vineyard often 
going long distances on foot or horse- 
back through all kinds of weather to 
fill appointments. He was a firm be- 
liever and strong defender of the Bi- 
ble doctrine of election, predestina- 
tion, total depravity and final perse- 
verence of the elect, through grace, 
to glory. 



I. L. OGLE. 

Ogle, Elder I. L., of Cosby, Tenn., 
is the beloved moderator of Nola 
Chucky Association of Tennessee, and 
the faithful pastor of churches within 
the bounds of this association. 



R. M. OGLE. 

Ogle, Elder R. M., of Calhoun, Mo., 
"was born in the state of Tennessee, in 
April, 1839, and moved to Linn County, 
Mo., in 1841. He obtained a hope in 
the year 1869, and united with Little 
Flock Church, Carroll County, Mo., the 
following year. He was ordained in 
Crooked River Church, Ray County, 



Mo., December 6, 1874. He now has 
the care of four churches and has 
served that number for several years." 




R. M. OGLE 



From Eider Cash's book 1896. A fuller 
sketch could not be prepared for this 
work for want of information. 




JOHN T. OLIPHANT. 

Oliphant, Elder John T., of Fort 
Branch, Ind., son of William and Mary 
Olipnant, was born July 23, 1841. 
Though he had some temporary visi- 
tations of alarming convictions be- 
tween tbe ages of five and eleven, yet 
not in the way of grace but rather in 
the works of Providence, and mostly 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



201 



accompanying events of deaths of re- 
lations or friends and would soon wear 
off. But at the age of twelve he was 
convicted of sin in such a manner 
that it has followed him until this day, 
and still causes him to hate sin and 
love righteousness. After many 
months of darkness, guilt and bond- 
age he was unexpectedly blessed with 
a sweet and joyful deliverance, united 
with the church October, 1855, and 
was baptized by Elder John Kinder, 
was some years afterward licensed 
and in August, 1SG9, was ordained to 
the full work of the ministry. For 
forty years Elder Oliphant has had the 
care of churches, is a faithful witness 
for the Master and much loved by his 
people. He writes of himself: "My life 
is far spent, my days are nearly num- 
bered, and I would not boast of self, 
but only in the great goodness and 
grace of the Lord. Where He has cast 
my lot, He has sustained me in min- 
istering to saints and delivering co 
poor perishing sinners messages of 
mercy and salvation. I pray for the 
peace and prosperity of Zion." 




P. T. OLIPHANT. 

Oliphant, Elder P. T., of Buena 
Vista, Ind. This able minister of the 
New Testament is from a Baptist fam- 
ily — his ancestors as far back as he 
can trace them were members of the 
Primitive Baptists, and his grand- 
father Thomas Oliphant, was a minis- 
ter in North Carolina. The subject of 
this notice is the son of Thomas and 
Nancy (Carmichael) Oliphant, and 
was born in Monroe County, Ind., De- 
cember 3, 1848. Nothing unusual mark- 
ed his history from infancy to man- 
hood, not common in the life of a boy 
raised on a farm. He was brought up 



in the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord and taught the way he should 
go by his parents, and his life was a 
moral, upright one, but true religion 
consists in a change of heart and affec- 
tions by the spirit of grace in regen- 
eration, and not in a matter of moral 
training. This he learned by the 
Spirit's teaching and was convicted of 
the exceeding sinfulness of sin and 
the depravity of the carnal heart; 
made to realize his helpless and hope- 
less condition in himself, and to plead 
for mercy at the throne of grace. Hope 
sprang up, relief came, his burden 
was gone and he was enabled to claim 
Jesus as his Saviour and from then 
till now has hope only in the free and 
unmerited mercy of God and viewing 
the end of his Christian warfare says: 
"With this hope I am expecting to 
meet death ere long; nor do I desire 
another, only I pray that he who first 
blessed me with it, will brighten it 
more and more unto the perfect day." 
Elder Oliphant united with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church called Union at 
Buena Vista, in his twenty-first year 
of age, was ordained eleven years 
later — in 1880 — and has since had the 
care of churches. He is the author of 
Edith Austin's Enquiry, and The Holy 
Scriptures on Women Preachers, and 
is an able writer, a gifted preacher 
and highly esteemed among the 
churches. » — 




R. A. OLIPHANT. 

Oliphant, Elder R. A., of Stanberry, 
Mo., "was born in Monroe County Ind. 



202 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



December 25, 1842, and united with 
Union Church, Green county, Ind., 
March IS, 1876. He was ordained June 
1, 1878, and has since served as pas- 
tor of churches, having at tlr's time 
the care of three churches." From Eld- 
er Cash's book. Later information 
could not be obtained for this work. 




JAS. H. OLIPHANT. 

Oliphant, Elder Jas. H., of/ Craw- 
fordsville, Ind. This very clear, strong 
and able writer, forceful and logical 
speaker, was born in Indiana in 1846, 
convicted of sin in 1868, and for about 
one year was in deep distress and soul 
sorrow. But He who enables His 
children to look within and see their 
own sinfulness, also in His own way 
and time, enables them to look to 
Jesus and see him as their sin-bearer. 
So it was with Elder Oliphant. In the 
year 1869 he was given a sweet hope 
in Jesus and united with the Baptists, 
commenced preaching in 1870, and 
was, the same year, called to the care 
of four churches. He has since thav 
time continually served four churches, 
has traveled considerably among the 
Baptists in the middle west and east, 
and his name is a household word 
among our people of many sections. 
But Elder Oliphant is most extensive- 
ly known by his writings. Besides be- 
ing associate editor of the Primitive 
Monitor, Gospel Messenger and Zion's 
Advocate, he has written and publish- 
ed several valuable books. In 1878 he 



wrote "Final Perseverance of the 
Saints." "Principles and Practices of 
Primitive Baptists" came from the 
press in 1883. A few years later fol- 
lowed able treatises on "Regenera- 
tion," Thoughts on the Will," and 
"Justification." He also published an 
interesting little book of correspond- 
ence with Elder Durand. His last 
work is entitled "Practical Sugges- 
tions for Common People." All these 
works have been well received among 
Primitive or Old School Baptists and 
manifest the author's clear insight cl 
the subjects handled. For force of 
logic Elder Oliphant has few superiors 
as a writer and speaker. Humble and 
devoted to the cause of truth, firm 
and uncompromising with error, kind 
and willing to forgive, he is a minis- 
ter of great usefulness among our peo- 
ple and highly esteemed for the 
truth's sake. 



THOMAS OLIPHANT. 

Oliphant, Elder Thomas. This faith- 
ful minister was born in North Caro- 
lina where he united with the Baptists 
and for several years served four 
churches. Later in life he moved to 
the state of Indiana and spent the re- 
mainder of his days in the ministry — 
serving churches mostly within the 
bounds of the White River Associa- 
tion. Four of his grandsons, viz: 
Elders J. H., J. T., R. A., and P. T. 
Oliphant are well and favorably 
known ministers of the Old School or- 
der. It is regretted that sufficient 
data for a suitable sketch of Elder 
Thomas Oliphant's life and labors 
could not be obtained. 



E. E. OLIVER. 

Oliver, Elder E. E., of Washington, 
D. C, was born in Fairfax County, 
Va., January 2, 1861, and raised by 
Primitive Baptist parents. His father 
was in the constitution of Bethel 
Church and served the church as 
clerk until his death. In 1878, at the 
age of seventeen, Elder Oliver was 
convicted of sin and made to mourn 
on account of it. But He who began 
the good work continued it, and in a 
few months Jesus was revealed to him 
as his sin-bearer and he received a 
good hope through grace; united with 
Bethel Church in 1879 and was bap- 
tized by Elder Benj. Bridges. Elder 
Onver was married to Miss Marietta 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



203 



Reid in 1885, licensed to preach in 
1890, and ordained the following year. 
After the death of Elder T. N. Alder- 




E. E. OLIVER 

ton he was elected pastor of Bethel 
Church and so continues to the pres- 
ent time. 

W. H. OSBOURN. 

Osbourn, Elder W. H., of Spring- 
dale, Ark., was born in Montgomery 
County, Kan., in 1877; moved with his 
father to Arkansas, when quite young, 
raised on farm at hard labor, and had 
poor opportunities to obtain an edu- 
cation. About the year 1899 he enter- 
ed school intending to study medicine, 
but became very much concerned 
about his soul's salvation, was deeply 
convicted of sin and troubled in spir- 
it. With this burden he could not ap- 
ply himself to his studies as he de- 
sired. But God was leading him in a 
way he knew not, he was taught of 
the Lord, given a sweet hope in 
Jesus, quit school, went home to his 
friends and told them what great 
things the Lord had done for him, was 
received and baptized March, 1901, 
one month later he was licensed and 
the following year — May,, 1902— was 
ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry. In March, 1902, Elder Osburn 
was married to Miss Louisa Jane 
Frake, who loves the same doctrine 
and enjoys the same fellowship in 
the church with her husband and 
urges him to go forward in the dis- 
charge of his ministerial duties. 



WM. OSBURN. 

Osburn, Elder Wm., son of James 
and 'Mary Osburn, was born in Ken- 



tucky July 12, 1834, moved to Indiana 
with his father when a child, and was 
married to Nancy Todd in 18G3 who 
lived only ten months, and two years 
later he was married to Eliza- 
beth Wtoolery. In 1867, he with his 
wife, moved from Indiana to Kansas, 
and in 1878 moved to Arkansas where 
he liA^ed until his death January 28, 
1908. In early life he obtained a hope 
in the Saviour but did not unite with 
the church until 1880 when he joined 
the Primitive Baptists at Bethlehem 
Church, and was later,, in the organiza- 
tion of Zion Church, where he, with 
his son, — Elder W. H. Osborn — were 
together ordained March, 1902, and 
where he ever afterward faithfully 
proclaimed Jesus the way, the truth 
and the life. It is said that for twenty- 
five years he did not miss but four 
regular meetings of his church. He 
loved the church and the fellowship 
of his brethren, yet always felt un- 
worthy of the love and esteem in 
which he was held by others. 




THOS. H. OWEN. 

Owen, Elder Thos. H., of Suisun 
Valley, Cal., was born in Buncombe 
County, N. O, in the year 1797. He 
moved to Illinois in 1816 and organiz- 
ed the first church in Hancock Coun- 
ty of that state. Elder Owen went to 
California in 1S49, and settled between 
Sacramento and San Francisco, and 
here he preached, organized churches 
and spent the remainder of his days, 
dying in the year 1880. He was an 



204 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



able preacher and his labors were 
blessed of the Lord to the comfort of 
many. 



WM. BRANCH OWEN. 

Owen, Elder Wm. Branch, was born 
June 29, 1825, in Halifax County, Va. 
He was the sixth and youngest son 
of Thomas Owen and Sallie Stewart 
Owen. His family moved to Ruther- 
ford County, Tenn., about the year 
1840, and settled in this immediate 
vicinity. He grew to manhood there 
and about 1848 he professed a hope 
in Jesus and joined old Cave Springs 
C. P. Church. Some time afterward he 
became a member of the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Providence, near 
Walter Hill. He was ever a faithful 
and earnest worker for the truths in 
which he trusted. Some years after 
joining the church,, he was ordained 
a minister, and never ceased to 
preach the word as he believed it — 
rightly dividing the word of truth and 
fearlessly defending his convictions. 
During his ministry he traveled 
and preached extensively, was always 
faithful and efficient; discharging 
every trust committed to him. He was 
on March 18, 1860, united in marriage 
to Miss Bettie Norton Nance, eldest 
daughter of Elder Josiah C. Nance, of 
Davidson County. He died in 1902. 




D. W. OWENS, M. D. 

Owens, Elder D. W. (M. D.), of Hers- 
man, 111. This gifted writer and able 



Illinois in 1868, and united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Water- 
ford, Fulton County, in November, 
1871. In 1872 he removed to Hancock 
County, and united with the Rock 
Creek Church, where he was ordained 
to the work of the ministry in June, 
1874. In 1878, he removed to Brown 
County, and became a member of Mt. 
Gilead Church near Hersman. Short- 
ly after becoming a member there, he 
was called to the pastorate of the 
church in connection with the late 
Elder James Harper, who died in 
1886; after which he was called to the 
full pastorate, and so continues to the 
present time. After he gave up the 
active practice of medicine, in 1899, 
he has had the care of other 
churches; and has been an editorial 
writer on the staff of the Messenger 
of Peace for several years. For the 
past thirty years he has attended 
meetings two Sundays and one Satur- 
day in each month at Mt, Gilead 
church with but very few excepticns 
and then only in cases when prevent- 
ed by sickness. Faithful, firmly rooted 
and grounded in the truth, a workman 
needeth not be ashamed he is an 
example to others and exerts a good 
influence by his godly walk and con- 
versation. 




BENJ. H. OWINGS. 

Owings, Elder Benjamin H., of Mad- 
ison, Mo., was born in Simpson Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, September 10, 1807, and 
moved to Missouri at an early day. 



preacher was born in Lewis County, | He commenced preaching in 1838, and 
Ky., August 16, 1845. He removed to was ordained the following year. He 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



205 



served the churches faithfully for half 
a century and lived in peace with his 
brethren. He was a member of Mt. 
Pleasant Church, Monroe County, Mo., 
at the time of his death, which oc- 
curred April 12, 1888, which church 
he had served as pastor for thirty 



years. He served as Moderator of Mt. 
Pleasant Association several years. 
The editor regrets that data for a 
fuller sketch of this useful minister's 
life could not be obtained for this 
work. 




J. A. PAINE. CM. D.) 

Paine, Elder J. A. (M. D.) of Dallas, 
Texas. This earnest, zealous and use- 
ful minister was born in 1846, in Law- 
rence County, Tenn. He received a 
hope in Jesus and united with the 
church early in life, was a gallant 
soldier in the Civil war, married Miss 
Sarah E. Blackmore which union 
has been blessed with seven children 
— among them two preachers — George 
A. (deceased), and S. A. Paine, who 
is living and is an able gift. Dr. Paine 
has been practicing medicine thirty- 
eight years — twenty in Tennessee, be- 
fore he moved to Texas, and has been 
preaching Jesus for thirty years. He is 
a strong preacher, a clear writer, an 
able debater — having engaged in sev- 
eral public debates, among them one 
with Elder J. A. Scarboro, represent- 
ing the Missionary or New School 
Baptists, in which Mr. S. affirmed the 
following proposition: — "That tbe 
Scriptures teach that repentance to- 
ward God and faith toward the Lord 
Jesus Christ are conditions to be per- 
formed by alien (dead) sinners in or- 
der to spiritual or eternal life." Elder 
Paine is a strong advocate of parental 



teaching of children and in a letter to 
the editor says: "We have taken 
great pains to establish our children 
(early) in the primitive faith and doc- 
trine, and by the grace of God, have 
succeeded, but have never felt it our 
duty to try to help the Lord regener- 
ate them. At our home we believe the 
old primitive doctrine to be the truth, 
and that the truth is good for our 
children, even the letter of it will 
never hurt them; trusting and pray- 
ing the good Lord to give experimen- 
tal knowledge, and then with the two 
witnesses they are so established that 
Arminianism will ever be a stench 
in their nostrils." 




S. A. PAINE. 

Paine, Elder S. A., of Dublin, Texas, 
son of Elder (Dr.) J. A. Paine, was 
born April 3, 1S74. He is the third son 
of Elder J. A. Paine; was reared to 
his fifteenth year in middle Tennessee 
— Wayne County. The entire family 
emigrated to Texas in 18S9. Began 
teaching at the age of eighteen years, 
and for twelve years engaged in the 
profession cf teaching, going to school 



206 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



a great deal during intervals. He was 
married in his twentieth year to Miss 
Ellen Burleson, a member of a dis 
tinguished pioneer family of Texas; 
received a hope in 1893; joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church in 1S97, at 
Mt. Peak, Ellis County, Texas; was 
liberated to preach in 1897, and or- 
dained in August, 1S9S. Since that 
time, when not teaching, he has been 
very actively engaged in the ministry, 
serving from one to four churches. 
Elder Paine has traveled a great deal 
for the short time engaged; has bap- 
tized about two hundred and twenty- 
five people, and held eighteen debates 
with representatives of other orders 
to the entire satisfaction of his breth- 
ren. He is now serving four churches, 
is satisfied with the order of God's 
house and content to be a plain, old- 
fashion Baptist. 




T. R. PALMER. 

Palmer, Elder T. R., of Pennsylva- 
nia, was born August 27, 1833, 
died June 21, 1905. He was baptized 
into the fellowship of the Sidling Hill 
Church by Elder C. L. Funk about 
1888. It was discovered soon after 
that he had a gift to preach and the 
church licensed him to exercise his 
gift, and he soon after was ordained 
to the full work of the ministry by 
Elders T. N. Alderton, A. J. Garland 
and C. L. Funk. His uprightness and 
integrity as a citizen and exemplary 
and faithful life as a minister gained 
for him the esteem and respect of his 
church. He was deep and profound in 
thought yet his gift was such as was 
adaptable to the comfort of babes in 



Christ as well as to those of full age. 
As a soldier in the late war he was 
valiant and faithful, and was equally 
so in the defense of the cause of his 
blessed Master. 




JOHN PARKER. 

Parker, Elder John, of Ohio. This 
able minister of the New Testament 
was born in Loudon County, Va., Feb- 
ruary 5, 1810, and died in Fayette 
County, Ohio, 'May 24, 1877, in the 
sixty-eighth year of his age. Elder 
Parker was a faithful and highly es- 
teemed minister and served one 
church in Hocking County cyer forty 
years, and other churches almost as 
long. He was the father of the late 
Mary Parker — the well known spirit- 
ual writer and patient sufferer, — bet- 
ter known through the publication, in 
book form, of much of her writings, 
entitled, "Reminiscences and Letters," 
edited by Elder S. H. Durand and his 
daughter, Miss Bessie Durand, of 
Southampton, Pa. The editor regrets 
that his efforts to secure data 
from which to prepare a suitable 
sketch of this worthy minister's life 
and labors proved fruitless. 



JOHN W. PARKER. 

Parker, Elder John W., was born in 
the state of Georgia, December 5, 
1831; received and baptized into the 
fellowship of the church of the Primi- 
tive Baptist faith and order at Pleas- 
ant Grove, Dale County, Alabama, Oc- 
tober 31, 1S5S; ordained to the office 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



207 



of deacon, March. 10, 18C0; ordained to 
the gospel ministry August 23, 1862, 
by Elders Jesse Tomlin and Charles 
S'. Pelham; departed this life in the 
city of Birmingham, Ala.. February 4, 
1909; and buried in the Ozark Ceme- 
tery on the next day following. He 
lived the life of the righteous, and 
died in the faith of Jesus Christ and 
in the fullest confidence, love and fel- 
lowship of the church. The grace of 
God richly abounded to him in the 
fruit of the Spirit, viz.: "Love, joy, 
peace, longsuffering, gentleness, good- 
ness, faith, meekness, temperance, 
against which there is no law." (Gal. 
v:22, 23.) As a gospel minister, Broth- 
er Parker was plain and simple, firm 
and forceful in his presentations of 
the doctrine of salvation by grace; 
consistent and conservative in his 
views and expressions with regard to 
the discipline and order of the house 
of God; in all he was a worthy exam- 
ple of Christian faith and piety. 



JOSEPH PARKER. 

Parker, Elder Joseph, of Ohio, a 
brother of Elder John Parker, was 
born in Loudon County, Va., April 18, 
1814, and died September 18, 1874. He 
was considered an able minister and 
after a long and faithful service died 
in Fayette County, O., in his sixty- 
first year of age in the full triumphs 
of faith. Detail information of his life 
and labors could not, by the editor, 
be obtained. 



N. V. PARKER. 

Parker, Elder N. V., of Walnut, 
Miss., was born in Tippah County, 
Mich., in 18G8. He was left an orphan 
at the age of twelve, convicted of sin 
in his fourteenth year and for many 
months felt to be without God and 
hope in the world. But when about fif- 
teen he was given a hope in the Sa 
viour and also given an impression to 
preach Jesus to others. In the twenty- 
first year of his age he united with 
the Primitive Baptists at Sardis 
Church, some years later was licensed 
and afterwards ordained to the work 
of the ministry. Elder Parker now has 
the care of two churches. 



JOSEPH PARKER. 

Parker, Elder Joseph (1805-1885), 
was born in South Carolina. His fath- 



er died before he was born; his moth- 
er, whose maiden name was Giden, 
died six years afterward. Consequently 
he was left an orphan very young to 
fight the battles of life without the 
councils of father and mother, which 
he by the help of the Lord was en- 
abled to do very successfully, both 
temporally and spiritually. In the 
year 1820 he moved to the state of 
Tennessee and in 1825 joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Shiloh, 
Lincoln County,, and was baptized by 
Elder Benjamin Walker. In 1828 he 
married Miss Faner Howard. Unto 
them sixteen children were born. In 
1834 he moved to Bedford County, set- 
tled on the head waters of Flat Creek 
and joined this church by letter and 
lived a devoted member till death 
closed his life of usefulness. He was 
ordained about the year 1861, which 
station be filled until death, retaining 
the confidence of his brethren and the 
respect of all that knew him, to the 
close of his useful life. 



PETERSON K. PARR. 

Parr, Elder Peterson K. (1825-1897), 
of Franklin, Ind., was a native of 
Tennessee, being born in Rcan Coun- 
ty; his parents emigrated to Indiana 
and settled in Johnson County. This 
county was his home during the rest 
of his life, except for one year of res- 
idence in Indianapolis, in 1843 he 
united with Mt. Gilead Church and 
was a faithful member for thirteen 
years. At the end of this time change 
of location in the county caused him 
to change his membership to Bethel 
Church, of which church he was a de- 
voted member the remainder of his life 
In 1865 his name appears in the Cons 
Creek Association minutes as "Clerk" 
and "Licentiate", and his clerkship of 
the association ' continued until his 
death. In 1S66 he was ordained to the 
work of the ministry at Bethel Church 
and served this church faithfully as 
pastor from then until his death. His 
business life was a true index to his 
Christianity, for his integrity was un- 
questionable. In his younger days he 
was one of the leading contractors of 
the county for road construction, and 
he served the people officially for 
thirty years. During his sickness his 
mind remained, not only clear, but 
was illuminated with the light of heav- 
en and he saw, as did John, visions of 
the glory that awaited him. He suf- 
fered, but with a spirit that triumphed 
over pain. His soul was great, for the 



208 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Lord had richly poured out His Spirit 
upon him, and that greatness of soul 
was shown by his humility, he being 
ever "less than the least." He did not 
know how good he was, but ever pray- 
ed. "According to Thy mercy, remem- 
ber mo, O Lord and Saviour." With 
a heart bathed in love and tenderness, 
he spoke and lived — a shepherd and a 
comforter. Not only in the church, but 
in his home was this true, for home 
and church were both sacred to him, 
and to serve in either was to render 
service to his beloved Master. 



ANSEL PARRISH. 

Parrish, Elder Ansel, was born the 
7th of July, 1824. and died at his home 
in Berrien County, Ga., the 16th of 
January, 1S91, leaving a widow and 
seventeen children, and eighty grand- 
children. He was married to Molly 
Knight December 15, 1842. Bro. Par- 
rish was a farmer and provided well 
for his family. He fed as many Bap- 
tist and other people as perhaps any 
Baptist in his state. He divided with 
the needy, was punctual to all his con- 
tracts, and always had a plenty. He 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Pleasant, in his nineteenth year, 
and was baptized by Elder Westberry. 
Seme time afterward it was manifested 
in him a gift to preach, and he was 
ordained in 1854. Bro. Parrish lived 
a model life as a Christian and a 
preacher, such as was worthy of imi- 
tation, and his preaching was a great 
comfort of the saints through- 
out the circle of his acquaintance. He 
was a gifted sheep-feeder, and labored 
for the cause of truth, the good of 
his brethren and the glory of God, 
and died in the triumphs of faith in 
his sixty-seventh year. 



J. N. PARSONS. 

Parsons, Elder J. N., of Ashland, 
Ala. The subject of this notice was 
born in Talladego County, Ala., July 
29, 1853. His parents were poor in this 
world's goods, and were unable to 
give their son the advantages of a lib- 
eral education. He grew up a boy 
noted for good morals. In the yeai 
1872 he was convicted of sin and pass- 
ed through a season of great mental 
darkness. It was at a prayer meeting 
that it pleased the Lord to relieve 
him of his burden and give him a 
sweet hope in Jesus. He united with 



the Missionary Baptists and remained 
some years with them, became dis- 
satisfied and convinced that they were 
not the church of Christ, left them 
about 1894 and was ordained a minis- 
ter in the Primitive Baptist Church 
seven years later. He is an humble, 
zealous and beloved minister, and la- 
bors for the comfort of Zion. 



SHADE PATE. 

Pate, Elder Shade, of North Caro- 
lina, was born March the 10th, 1807, 
died October 11, 1891. At the age of 
twenty-one he united with the Primi- 
tive Baptists at Nahunta, and was 
baptized by Elder Haywood Ham. A 
short time after this he was ordained 
to the ministry, and he was pastor at 
Nahunta when he died. He was zeal- 
ous in the work of the ministry and 
labored for peace and love and fellow- 
ship among the children of God. 



D. W. PATMAN. 

Patman, Elder D. W. (1810-1882), of 
Georgia, was born in Oglethorpe Coun- 
ty, united with the Primitive Baptists 
in early life after vainly trying to 
"get religion at Methodists revival 
meetings." In his experience, the Lord 
taught him his helpless condition and 
revealed Jesus as his only Saviour. 
Soon after he united with the church 
he was greatly impressed with the 
duty of preaching Jesus to others and 
was later in life ordained to the gos- 
pel work, and faithfully filled this of- 
fice until his death. Elder Patman 
was an extraordinary man in many 
respects and few men possessed more 
good sense or ready wit naturally; 
and as a minister of the gospel he 
was an able gift, and his general 
character for truth and honesty was 
above suspicion. 



A. W. PATTERSON. 

Patterson, Elder A. W., of States- 
boro, Ga., was born in Union County, 
Ga., August 1, 1847, moved with his 
parents to Baldwin County, at the age 
of ten, thence to Wilkinson County, 
where he lived until 1897. Since then 
he has lived at Statesboro. From early 
youth he felt the Lord would require 
him to preach, and at the age of sev- 
enteen he was deeply convicted of sin. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



209 



This burden of guilt and the impres- 
sion to preach made his condition 
fearful, but after three years of strug- 
gle in the wilderness of sin he found 
peace in Jesus and united with Mt. 
Carmel Church in Wilkinson County. 
Then his burden of preaching became 
heavier — his impressions stronger, 
and after eight years of trials and 
tears he was made willing, was or- 




A. W. PATTERSON 



dained to the full work of the minis- 
try in 1S77 by Elders H. Temple, J. 
I. Keel and James Fields; has since 
had the care of churches and has 
traveled and preached in Georgia 
and portions of thirteen other states. 
Elder Patterson faithfully sets forth 
Jesus the way, the truth and the life 
in his preaching and is highly esteem- 
ed by his brethren. 



ARCHIBALD PATTISON. 

Pattison, Elder Archibald (1797- 
1S52). Born in North Carolina, when 
a young man moved to Tennessee, 
and later to 'Missouri, united with the 
Baptist Church 1823, ordained 1829 
and was a gifted minister. He possess- 
ed a gift much above mediocrity. 
With a discriminating mind, retentive 
memory, able reasoning faculties 
clear, strong and melodious voice, he 
commanded the attention of all who 
heard him, and exerted considerable 
influence wherever he labored — he 



was well known and much beloved by 
the brethren throughout North Mis- 
souri, and especially will the churches 
in Boone, Monroe, Randolph and How- 
ard counties, in whose midst he lived 
and labored, long delight to remember 
him, and the faithful services he ren- 
dered them. 



ZARA PAULK. 

Paulk, Elder Zara, of Georgia, who 
died March 7, 1892, was convicted of 
sin and brought to the knowledge of 
the truth of salvation in Jesus in 
1856, united with the church and was 
soon set apart to the work of the min- 
istry. He was an humble man, able 
preacher, an excellent disciplinarian, 
and possessed great Christian forti- 
tude and forbearance. 



HENRY PEEL. 

Peel, Elder Henry, of North Caroli- 
na. This highly esteemed brother was 
born in Martin County, N. O, January 
11, 1829, and died May 23, 1908; con- 
victed of sin in his twenty-second 
year and given a sweet home in Jesus, 
and united with the church at Smith- 
wicks Creek in October, 1852. He was 
soon impressed with the duty of 
preaching and in June, 1860, the 
church seeing that he had a gift liber- 
ated him to exercise his gift within 
the bounds of the church, and by Sep- 
tember of the same year his preach- 
ing had proven so satisfactory that 
the church gave him license to preach 
where he might feel impressed to 
travel. Elder Peel was ordained to ad- 
minister all the ordinances of the 
church March, 1864, by Elders C. B. 
Hassell and William B. Perry. He was 
a faithful pastor served the church 
very zealously, laying a worthy ex- 
ample for a gospel minister. He was 
always on time, never waiting for the 
congregation, saying that the appoint- 
ed time had. come to begin the wor- 
ship. He often exhorted the brethren 
to do their duty. He traveled and 
preached considerably in North Caro- 
lina and some in Tennessee and his 
diary shows he baptized 113 persons, 
married 165 couples, and preached 
350 funerals, traveling 3,240 miles for 
the one purpose of preaching Jesus, 
never charging anything for any of 
his ministerial labors, holding the 
service of Christ to be above price. 
Like Paul he labored with his own 
hands to support himself and those 
depending on him. 



210 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



J. C. PENDER. 

Pender, Elder J. C, was born in 
Lawrence County, Ind., March 5th, 
1825, and died at his home in Madison 
County, Iowa, September 13, 1895. He 
removed with his family to Iowa in 
the year 1849, and remained until the 
year 1865 when they moved to Arkan- 
sas and stayed there until the year 
1876 when he again removed to Iowa 
where he resided until his death with 
the exception of the last year, which 
he spent in Missouri, returning to 
Iowa a short time before his demise. 
Bro. Pender united with Middle River 
Church of Regular Predestinarian 
Baptists in the year 1877 and was li- 
censed to preach in 1886, in which of- 
fice he acted until called home. He did 
not try to attract the attention or ad- 
miration of the world, nor did he try 
to preach to suit any of the brethren, 
but was always ready to feed the flock 
with the spiritual food that was given 
him by the great Shepherd, and was 
faithful and greatly loved as a pastor. 



J. M. PERKINS. 

Perkins, Elder J. M., of Mayfield, 
Ky. From Elder Potter's Souvenir 
book published in 1895 it is learned 
that Elder Perkins was born in Ken- 
tucky on the 1st day of March, 1847, 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church in 
1872, was ordained to the work of the 
ministry in 1873, and is now pastor 
of four churches. Later information 
could not be obtained. 



R. W. PETERS. 

Peters, Elder R. W., son of Gershom 
and Ann Walcutt Peters, was born 
February 7, 1846, in Franklin County, 
Ohio, and died October 3, 1907. After 
spending his boyhood with his par- 
ents, he enlisted for service in Com- 
pany E, First Regiment, Ohio Volun- 
teer Cavalry in the Spring of 1864, 
and served until the close of the war. 
He returned to Pickaway County, 0., 
and settled on the farm where he 
spent the remainder of his life. In 
1874 he united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Darbyville, was or- 
dained to the ministry in 1S87, at 
Darbyville Church in which he served 
faithfully until declining health com- 
pelled him to retire. During his minis- 
try he served four churches as pastor 



and was to them a kind shepherd. He 
served two years as moderator of the 
Scioto Association, and was faithful 
in all things pertaining to the gospel 
work, was a kind husband, wise fath- 
er, good citizen and left a good name 
to his several children and grandchild- 
ren. 



T. I. PETTUS. 

Pettus, Elder T. I., of Tennessee, 
was born November 11, 1877, and died 
March 28, 1904, at the early age of 
twenty-six years. He united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Wilson's 
Creek, Triune, Tenn., in 1893, and was 
baptized by Elder J. E. Frost. He 
began to exercise in public some in 
1895 and was ordained in May, 1902. 
In 1898 he received the L. I. degree at 
the University of Nashville and until 
a year before his death devoted his 
time to teaching. He spent the year 
1903 entirely in ministerial duties. At 
the time of his death he had charge of 
four churches, all in prosperous condi- 
tion, for which he often expressed his 
humble gratitude to God. He, during 
his short time in the ministry, had the 
pleasure of baptizing eighty-six per- 
sons with ages ranging from eleven 
years to eighty-two. Brother Pettus 
seemed to consider it his duty to visit 
especially the weak churches and des- 
titute places. He was an excellent pas- 
tor looking well after the interest of 
his churches, was a man of many 
friends both in the church and out of 
it. Most of his ministerial labors were 
in the bounds of the Sequachee Val- 
ley Association, and his churches felt 
that they had indeed sustained a great 
loss in his death. 



ENOCH PHILLIPS. 

Phillips, Elder Enoch, of Georgia, 
was born October 12. 1828. He was 
raised by Primitive Baptist parents 
and grew up a moral boy. He was 
married November 21, 1850. Shortly 
after this time the Lord enabled 
him to see and realize that he 
was a guilty sinner justly condemned 
before a just and holy God. In due 
time he was blessed with a gcod hope 
in the Lord Jesus Christ as his 
Saviour. He was baptized into the 
Primitive Baptist Church June 2, 
1855, and lived a consistent and faith- 
ful member of that faith until death. 
He was ordained to the ministry July 
15, 1865, and faithfully discharged his 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



211 



duty in that capacity as long as he 
lived, ever holding his duty to God 
and his brethren above everything 
else. He lived a faithful life as a 
church member, minister, a citizen 
and Christian gentleman. He was 
chosen moderator of the New Hope 
Association in 1904 and held that 
position until his death, November 
19, 1906. 



the Master. He now has the care of 
five churches, all in peace and love 
and a healthy condition. 



JOHN D. PHILLIPS. 

Phillips, Elder John D. (1826-1899), 
of Georgia. In 1845 he was married to 
Miss Sarah Davis, moved to Carroll 
County, 1856, united with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church at Concord in 
1859, and was baptized by Elder R. T. 
Speight. He soon began to speak in 
public, and was ordained at Piney 
Woods Church, Havalson County, 
1868. He was an able minister of the 
New Testament, ever contending for 
the faith that was once delivered un- 
to the saints. 




DAVID PHILLIPS. 

Phillips, Elder David, of Walter- 
town, Tenn. This humble and spiritu- 
ally minded brother was born April 
26, 1850. When about ten years of age 
the subjects of death, hell and the 
grave were forcibly impressed on his 
mind; he was convicted of sin, labor- 
ed under the law for righteousness 
but came to the end of the law and 
found righteousness — even Jesus, — 
united with the Baptists, was soon or- 
dained and for the past twenty-one 
years has been a faithful witness for 




A. B. PHILPOT. 

Philpot, Elder A. B., of Philpot, Va., 
was born in Henry County, Va., De- 
cember 21, 1S58. He grew to manhood 
wild and reckless, seeking the pleas- 
ures of the world, with no fear of God 
before his eyes; but when about nine- 
teen years old he was convicted of sin 
and heard his first sermon under the 
preaching of Elder Bodenheimer. 
But it was several years later before 
he put on a public profession of 
Christ, during which time he under- 
went much burden of soul, and was 
given many beautiful dreams teach- 
ing him the salvation in Jesus. He 
united with the church in 1879, and 
was baptized by Elder Peter Corn. He 
was soon burdened with the duty of 
preaching Jesus to others and after 
much conflict of mind, began to exer- 
cise in public and was about 1883, 
ordained by Elders P. G. Lester, Amos 
Dickson, T. L. Roberson and Petei 
Corn, and has since had the care of 
churches. Elder Philpot is established 
in the doctrine and practice of the 
apostolic church and wants no new 
gospel or practice in the house of God. 
In early life he was married to Mrs. 
Mary E. He'ms, and the Lord has 
blessed them together. 



BENNETT PITT. 

Pitt, Elder Bennett, of North Caro- 
lina. This faithful and highly con- 
scientious servant of God was born in 



212 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Edgecombe County, N. C, about the 
beginning of the nineteenth century, 
lived in this county all his life and 
died there about twenty years ago. 
He was a member of Lower Town 
Creek, was advanced to the work of 
the gospel ministry in middle age 
and was an acceptable preacher and 
highly esteemed by liis churches. 
Elder Pitt was possessed of many no- 
ble traits of character and lived the 
doctrine he preached to others. His 
departure was peaceful and triumph- 
ant. 



B. C. PITT. 



Pitt, Elder B. C, son of Elder Ben- 
nett Pitt, was a native of Edgecombe 
County, N. C. He was a blameless, 
lovely man and a gifted preacher. His 
membership was at Lower Town 
Creek Church, convicted of sin in 
early life, united with the church and 
was soon set apart to the gospel min- 
istry. He served churches in the 
Kehukee Association, but his health 
was poor and he passed away in mid- 
dle life lamented and missed by the 
Baptists of his association, and the 
editor regrets that data for more ex- 
tended sketches of the lives and la- 
bors of both Elder B. C. Pitt and his 
honored father could not be obtained. 



WILEY PITTMAN. 

Pittman, Elder Wiley. From an old 
copy of the minutes of the Kehukee 
Association of 1864, the editor copies 
the following in reference to Elder 
Pittman: "He was born on the 27th 
of July, 1815 — in one of the most re- 
tired spots in Edgecombe County, N. 
C, and was raised up in the same 
neighborhood where he was born — 
with little or no education — and was 
not even favored with the advantages 
of literary associates. He was married 
en the 4th of December, 1S3S; came be- 
fore the church and offered for mem- 
bership at Williams meeting house, 
Edgecombe County, Saturday before 
the second Sunday in November, 1842, 
and was baptized on Friday following. 
He commenced preaching in 1854, and 
was ordained in 1857. He was looked 
upon universally, where known, as a 
very sound gospel minister, and dwelt 
mostly on experimental preaching. He 
was held in high esteem by persons 
who differed with him in sentiment, 
because of his good common sense 



and meek and humble deportment. He 
was what the world would call a poor 
man, and was so afflicted in body as 
to be unable to labor much on the 
farm, but what of a support he could 
not raise at home, was supplied by his 
biethren and friends round about, es- 
pecially those who made no profes- 
sion of religion. He died November 
22, 1861, — leaving a wife, nine child- 
ren — five sons and four daughters — 
the church at Williams, and a large 
circle of friends to lament his death. 
Elder Pittman was neither rich nor 
great in the common acceptation of 
the world, but was more than both; 
a good man. He bore his protracted 
illness with Christiain patience and 
resignation, and well may we add in 
conclusion "mark the perfect man, 
and behold the upright; for the end 
of that man is peace." The editor, who 
is a grandson of the subject of this 
sketch, desires only to add, that Elder 
Pittman's limited education was a 
heavy cross to him in the ministry. 
Many were the excuses he offered as 
reasons why he should not preach. 
But none were sufficient. God uses 
the foolish things to confound the 
wise, and God used him for His glory 
and the good of his people. Such a life 
of faithful service and such a name 
as his, is rather to be chosen than 
great riches, and is an invaluable leg- 
acy to his descendants. 




T. R. PITTMAN. 

Pittman, Elder T. R., of Havana, 
Kan., was born in Crawford County, 
Ohio, March 15, 1843, and was the 
fifth of ten children born to his pa- 
rents, who immigrated from Fulton 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



213 



County, Pa. His lather, John Pittman, 
who was a son of Benjamin Pitman, 
was born near Hancock, Md. Almost 
from his earliest recollection, Elder 
Pittman had serious thoughts about 
the subject of religion, was a fre- 
quent reader of the Signs of the 
Times and became somewhat ac- 
quainted with the doctrine of the Bi- 
ble in the letter, though knew but lit- 
tle of the spirit. In 1862 he was, while 
attending the Sandusky Association 
blessed to hear his first sermon, un- 
derstandingly. Four years later he 
united with the church and was bap- 
tized by Elder Lewis Seitz. In 1873 he 
moved to his present home and was, 
in 1900, ordained by Bethlehem 
Church, to the gospel ministry, and 
has since been content in preaching 
the simple gospel of salvation by 
grace unadulterated by the works of 
men. He is also at present, postmaster 
at Havana. 



.:.«SP|P 



r 







R. H. PITTMAN. 

Pittman, Elder R. H., of Luray, Va., 
was born in Edgecombe County, N. O, 
August 20, 1S70. His parents — R. E. 
and Sarah (Pitt) Pittman, were of 
English descent. He is the second son 
and third child of a family of ten 
children and was raised on a farm 
with the usual advantages of a com- 
mon school education. In youth he 
possessed a thirst for knowledge and 
an ambition to attain positions of 
honor and usefulness. His father be- 
ing limited in "this world's goods," 
could not at the time give him a busi- 
ness or collegiate education, but did 
willingly permit him to leave home 
for the purpose of obtaining an edu- 



cation at his own expense. Feeling 
that "where there's a will, there's a 
way," he left his father's farm in his 
seventeenth year of age, entered 
school at Whitakers' Academy, where 
he, in addition to the ordinary 
courses, continued his study of teleg- 
raphy begun while on the farm and 
the following year entered business as 
railroad agent and telegraph operator, 
and before his twenty-first year of age 
had, Dy close economy and strict at- 
tention to business, paid his school 
expenses and about five hundred dol- 
lars to his father. This youthful suc- 
cess is mentioned with the hope that 
it may inspire in others self-exertion 
and a loyal parental service, for 
though his parents did not require 
from him all he did for them during 
this period, yet he felt his service 
belonged to them while he was under 
age, and feels he has learned by ex- 
perience that one is never the loser, 
but is blessed, in such service. About 
this time he took up the study of law, 
but soon became disinterested in law 
and greatly interested in religion; so 
much so, that he could not rest with 
a clear conscience until he went be- 
fore the Primitive Baptist Church call- 
ed Hopeland, in North Carolina and 
asked for a home among those dear 
people. This was December 31, 1892, 
and the following day amid ice and 
snow he was baptized by Elder A. J. 
Moore, was licensed in 1893 and or- 
dained in 1900. In 1893 he was given a 
year's leave-of-absence by his em- 
ployers — the A. C. L. Ry. Co., which 
time he spent in the University of 
North Carolina, after which he resum- 
ed his work with above company, at 
Bishopville, S. C , continued with 
them until 1906, when he resigned all 
business connection and the care of 
churches in South Carolina in order 
to serve churches in Virginia, where 
he is now located. Before his ordina- 
tion to the ministerial work Elder 
Pittman took an active interest in 
the moral, intellectual and business 
up-building of his home town, and has, 
since taking the care of churches, 
manifested the same interest, and 
when not engaged in his ministerial 
duties has labored in other callings. 
He has in the past held several posi- 
tions in R. R. service; served as a 
member of the board of directors of 
State Bank, and of various corpora- 
tions; president of cotton seed oil 
mill, member of legislature of South 
Carolina (sessions 1904-05) ; presi- 
dent literary and debating society, 
lieutenant in home company of (S. 0.) 



214 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



state militia, etc.; yet feels that all 
worldly pursuits should be subserv- 
ant to, and sacrificed for, the work 
of the ministry when they materially 
conflict. In 1896 he was married to 
Mliss Eunice Elizabeth Barnes — a true 
and loyal companion, and they have 
four children — Dalton, Leland, Vir- 
ginia and Groveen, to cheer their path- 
way and brighten their home. 



JOHN PLUM. 

Plum, Elder John. This faithful min- 
ister died September 16, 1892, at his 
home near Hannahsville, Tucker 
County, W. Va , in his seventieth 
year. He was born in Monongalia 
County, W. Va., united with Eden 
Church about the year 1854 and was 
baptized by Elder Herbert Cool. Two 
years later he began preaching, was 
ordained to the work of the ministry 
and for about thirty-six years fought 
the good fight of faith. In his preach- 
ing he determined to know nothing 
save Christ and Him crucified as the 
way of salvation, and without fear or 
favor desired to declare the whole 
counsel of God. The doctrine of elec- 
tion, predestination, foreordination, 
calling, justification and glorification 
of all the heirs of promise was his 
faith and the themes he loved to dwell 
upon. 



CHARLES POLKINHORN. 

Polkinhorn, Elder Charles, of Vir- 
ginia. For many years Elder Polkin- 
horn served the Shiloh Old School 
Baptist Church of Washington, D. C, 
and several churches in Virginia, and 
was considered an able, faithful and 
devoted minister. He died, in the vi- 
cinity of Ebenezer Church in Laudon 
County, Va., December 22, 1836, after 
a long and useful service in the 
Master's kingdom. 



WM. POLLARD. 

Pollard, Elder Wm., was born in 
Suffolk County, Eng., February 10, 
1825. His parents were Baptists, and 
firm believers in the doctrine of sov- 
ereign grace as held by the Old 
School Baptists of today. Wihen he 
was about seven years of age he 
moved with his parents to Canada, and 
when at the age of 22 years he mar- 
ried Mary Jamieson, and united with 
the Baptist Church at the age of 



twenty-four. About two years after 
uniting with the church, he felt strong 
impressions to speak publicly of the 
things of the kingdom of God, and 
though he struggled hard against 
these impressions, and felt determin- 
ed not to speak in the name of the 
Lord ,the time came when he was 
compelled to open his mouth and 
preach Christ and Him crucified, as 
the only salvation for poor, ruined 
sinners, the church giving him liberty 
to exercise his gift, and so comfort- 
ing and strengthening was his preach- 
ing, that in the year 1855 he was 
ordained to the full work of the min- 
istry by Elders Gilbert Beebe, Thos. 
P. Dudley and J. F. Johnson. He was 
soon called to the care of churches, 
and served, among others, the 
church at Dundas, Ont., and War- 
wick, in N. Y. and grew in the love 
and esteem of the church and people 
among whom he labored so long and 
faithfully. His preaching was clear 
and discriminating, and had great va- 
riety in truth. It was wonderful the 
many new things he was given to say 
on the old theme of salvation by 
grace. He was never afraid to preach 
the principle of predestination and 
salvation by grace both for time and 
eternity. He was a faithful, devoted 
pastor, untiring in his labor of love 
for the children of God; firm, stead- 
fast and immovable in the doctrine of 
God our Saviour; and was faithful 
until the end and could say with the 
Apostle Paul, "I have fought a good 
fight; I have kept the faith." 




W. J. POLLARD. 

Pollard, Elder W. J., of Nebraska 
City, Neb., son of Stephen Pollard, was 
born in Jefferson County, Tenn. March 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



215 



4, 1838. His grandfather, Jesse Pol- 
lard was born in Culpepper County, Va. 
and moved to east Tennessee. Elder 
Pollard's father moved from Tennessee 
to Missouri, in 1850, where the sub- 
ject of this notice was reared to man- 
hood. In 18C3 he, with his wife and 
two children, moved to Illinois, and 
the following year he was convicted 
of sin, felt that condemnation must 
be his portion, but unexpectedly Jesus 
was revealed as his sin offering, and 
faith in Him created joy where only 
sorrow had before reigned. He united 
with Little Missouri Primitive Bap- 
tist Church in Illinois, but soon mov- 
ed back to Missouri, and was in 1871 
ordained to the work of the gospel 
ministry by Elders Baley Tabb, Jas. 
Duval, Isaac Odell, Allen Sisk and W. 
T. Brown. Elder Pollard has been in 
the ministry nearly forty years, has 
served from two to six churches most 
of the time, has baptized about four 
hundred persons, served as modera- 
tor of the Nottoway Association aud 
traveled and preached in several 
states. Though growing feeble in body 
he is strong in the Lord and earnest- 
ly and faithfully declares the doctrine 
of God our Saviour. He passed 
through the Burnam division in Mis- 
souri, back in the '80's, opposing his 
regeneration theory and Armenian 
practices. He is now serving Liberty 
Church near Nebraska City, Neb. 



B. J. POLLARD. 

Pollard, Elder B. J. (1803-1870), of 
North Carolina. This useful minister 
united with the Primitive Baptists 
early in life, was soon thereafter or- 
dained a minister and served churches 
mainly in Onslow and Carteret Coun- 
ties. Prior, and during the Civil war, 
he served his county as justice of 
peace. Was also, for some years, post- 
master, and in all the relations of 
life proved his sterling worth. As hus- 
band, father, neighbor and citizen he 
gave evidence of a nobility of nature 
worthy of emulation; and as a minis- 
ter of Jesus manifested energy, zeal 
and an abounding love for the cause 
of God and truth. To the young he 
was a faithful adviser; to the poor 
a charitable visitor; to the widow and 
orphan a comforter and protector. He 
died in his sixty-seventh year relying 
in the faith he had preached to oth- 
ers. 




F. M. POPE. 

Pope, Elder F. M., of Boyle City, 
111., was born in Fayette County, Oc- 
tober 3, 18G6, raised on the farm, mar- 
ried to Miss Maggie M. Helford, Octo- 
ber, 1889, convicted of sin and given 
a sweet hope in Jesus and united 
with the Primitive Baptists at Liberty 
Church, August, 1903. Before uniting 
with the church he had impressions to 
preach Jesus, and began exercising 
nis gift publicly July, 1904, and in 
September was licensed to preach, 
and in December, same year, was or- 
dained to the ministerial work. He 
was soon called to the care of 
churches and has since had the care 
of from two to four. Elder Pope has 
traveled and preached in Illinois, Ind- 
iana, Tennessee, Missouri, and Arkan- 
sas, and has been well received, is an 
interesting speaker and bold defender 
of the truth as it is in Jesus. The 
Lord has blessed his labors, and he 
feels satisfied with the doctrine and 
practice of the apostolic church. 



L. B. PORTER. 

Porter, Elder L. B. (1814-1897), of 
Russell County, Ala. The character of 
this man as a citizen, a member of 
the church and a minister of the gos- 
pel, was above reproach. He united 
with the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Pleasant Plains, in Wilkinson 
County, Ga., in 1S44, and was baptized 
by John Evers. In 1849 he was ordain- 
ed to the ministerial work, and until 
his death faithfully served the church. 
He was noted for his humility and 
meekness, and was greatly loved by 



216 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



those among whom he labored. He 
was twice married and several child- 
ren and many grandchildren survive 
hiim. Among his children is Elder 
David L. Porter of Mississippi. 



THOMAS POTEET. 

Poteet, Elder Thomas, who died in 
1843 was an able and faithful minister. 
His services were mostly confined 
within the bounds of the Baltimore 
Association. His labors were blessed 
to the upbuilding of the cause of 
truth and to the edification of God's 
children. 



G. POTTER. 

Potter, Elder G., was born in 
Surry County, N. O, 1798. His pa- 
rents were both born in England. 
Both lived and died Primitive Bap- 
tists. Brother Potter, while living at 
home with his parents, was made to 
see himself a sinner. He said: "As 
I compared myself with God's word, 
'sin' revived and I died to all hope 
of salvation by my good deeds, and I 
understood no other. As I returned 
with my father from meeting one 
night, just us two alone, I stopped 
and told him I was ruined; that I 
saw no way of my escape. I never 
shall forget the terrible gloom that 
was upon me that night. About mid- 
night I got up and left the house with 
no particular place in view and I went 
a quarter of a mile or more and fell 
on my face and tried to pray. And 
I thought of the words, 'Come unto 
me all ye that labor and are heavy 
laden and I will give you rest.' In a 
moment I felt sure that these words 
applied to me and my sense of ruin 
and guilt was gone, and I was happy 
and rejoiced in the sweet assurance 
that Christ was mine." After receiv- 
ing a hope in Christ, Bro. Potter be- 
came concerned about joining the 
church and, being fully convinced by 
reading the Testament and by his ex- 
perience that the Primitive Baptist 
was the church, he joined that church 
and was baptized by Elder Thomas 
Oliphant. After joining the church his 
mind was impressed with the duty of 
preaching the gospel of the Son of 
God,, and was ordained to the full 
work of the gospel ministry in 1824. 
He died March, 1894, aged ninety-five 
years, nine months, having served in 



the ministry seventy-one years, and 
was faithful until the end. He died as 
he lived, trusting in God. 




LEMUEL POTTER. 

Potter, Elder Lemuel. This eminent 
servant of God met the last enemy in 
his fiity-sixth year, and was buried at 
Poseyville, Ind., December 10, 1897. In 
18G3 he was married to Miss Lydia 
Jane Humphreys who bore him seven 
children, five of whom survive. He 
joined Providence Primitive Baptist 
Church of Wayne County, 111., in 1863, 
and was ordained to the work of 
the ministry in April, 18G7. He was 
an untiring student, and he un- 
derstood and believed the doctrine 
of his church and defended it 
with a zeal and energy that has 
never been surpassed by anyone 
in our midst. He frequently engaged 
in public debates, and was willing to 
defend our people against any one op- 
posing. He knew what he believed and 
why, and was entirely fearless. He was 
not an ambitious man; he was for the 
peace to our ueople; he once said he 
"Wanted no Potterites" to follow him; 
he was not covetous, but was content 
with such things as he had. He left 
a small estate to his family. Had he 
devoted his talent to the work ot 
accumulating, he could have amassed 
a fortune. His oratorical power and 
talent would have graced the senate 
chamber, but God gave it to our peo- 
ple, and we enjoyed it for over a quar- 
ter of a century. He was loved by his 
people, and was faithful even unto 
death. His personal character was 
without a stain, and he was so widely 
known and so universally beloved 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



217 



that it would seem almost superfluous 
to speak of his character or work. He 
traveled much among the churches 
and associations, and labored untir- 
ingly wherever circumstances placed 
him. He was the founder of the 
Church Advocate, and its editor until 
his death. As a defender and advocate 
of the faith and doctrine of the Old 
School or Primitive Baptists, we judge 
none among us were his superiors. 
His instructive autobiography in gen- 
eral circulation among our people is 
esteemed of great value and a record 
that prevents the need of many words 
here. As an author and editor, a min- 
ister and pastor, a debator and de- 
fender, a pulpit orator and expounder 
of the Bible and Bible doctrine, and 
as a Christian and high toned gen- 
tleman, he was of the first rank 
among our people, a bright example 
for our imitation, that we may excel 
in the Church of God below. 



G. B. POWELL. 

Powell, Elder G. B. (1838-1905), of 
North Carolina, was the son of "Wlillie 
and Alice Powell, united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Cedar 
Grove, Wake County, N. C, 1866, and 
was baptized by Elder B. Temple. He 
was in the same year chosen clerk of 
his church and in 1872 ordained a 
deacon and in 1887 ordained to the gos- 
pel ministry by Elders James Wilson 
and John C. Hudgens. He was of a 
family noted for kindness and hospi- 
tality, frankness, seriousness, truth- 
fulness and most comely demeanor, 
and was a gifted preacher. 



B. W. POWER. 

Power, Elder B. W., of Hamshire 
County W. Wa„ was born in Loudon 
County, Va., December 26, 1836, raised 
by parents who were members of the 
New School Baptist Church and sent 
to Sunday School and became a Sun- 
day school teacher, at the age of eigh- 
teen, became much interested in his 
soul's salvation and united with the 
New School Church, but becoming 
dissatisfied left them and joined the 
Primitive or Old School Baptists and 
was baptized by Elder Lewis Kagy. He 
was soon licensed to preach by Mt. 
Olive Church, Morgan County, O., — 
near where he was then living, — and 
soon after he moved to his present 
home he was ordained by Little Capon 
Church in 1886 to the full functions of 



the gospel, and has since had the care 
of three to five churches, and is a 
faithful minister, seldom missing an 
appointment though in his seventy- 
third year of age. He is also noted 
for his frugality, industry and hospi- 




B. w. POWER 

tality. He served about one year in 
the war and was in the battles of 
Mannasas, Bull Run and Ball's Bluff 
and was afterwards married to Miss 
Mary F. Sullivan of Leesburg, Va., to 
whom were born thirteen children, 
most of whom are still living. 



H. H. POULSON. 

Poulson, Eider H. H. (1850-1901), of 
Indiana, was born in Harrison Coun- 
ty, Ind., and moved to Orange County, 
Ind., about the year 1850. A few years 
previous to his death he moved to the 
French Lick Springs, in the above 
named county. He joined the Baptist 
Church at Sinking Spring, 1855, and 
was ordained to the work of the gos- 
pel ministry 1SS9. Elder Poulson was 
given to hospitality. His kindness and 
generosity won for him a wide circle 
of friends. His home was a Baptist 
home where many weary pilgrims 
found rest and refreshment. His pas- 
toral labors were principally confined 
to churches near his home, where he 
labored with due reverence and godly 
zeal that made his labors very accept- 
able and profitable to all that re- 
ceived them. He was a kind husband 
and father; a highly respected citizen. 



T. M. POULSON. 

Poulson, Elder T. M., of Massey.Va., 
was bcrn January 14, 1831. His 
parents were members of the Mis- 



218 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



sionary or New School Church and he 
was taught by preceptf and example 
the moral law. But when he was given 
an experience of grace, which began 
with him in early youth, he was made 
to know that salvation was of the 
Lord and not of men, and he discarded 
all human agencies in the matter of 
giving life to the dead sinner. During 
this time he had never heard a Prim- 
itive Baptist preach, and when some- 
time afterwards he heard the gospel 
preached by them he felt they were 
his people, united with Mesongoes 
Church, Accomack County, Va., and 
was baptized by Elder T. Waters. He 
began preaching in 18GS and in July, 
1869, was ordained by Elders S. H. 
Durand, E. Rittenhouse and G. W. 
Staton and has since had the care of 
from two to five churches. Elder Poul- 
son is now in his seventy-eighth year 
but is strong in faith, zealous in the 
cause and still faithful to the churches 
of his care, traveling hundreds and 
thousands of miles a year in his ef- 
forts to glorify God and benefit his 
people. 




J. THOMPSON POWER. 

Power. Eider J. Thompson, of Lev- 
els, W. Va., was born in Washington 
County, O., June 17, 1871, where he 
lived till the age of fourteen 
when he moved with his pa- 
rents to Hampshire County, W. Va. 
He was raised at hard labor on his 
father's farm and was kept so busy 
that he had very little time for study- 
ing or going to school, and found him- 
self well grown with but little educa- 
tion. He however, realized tne im- 
portance of an education and set to 



work to secure what he could and in 
a short time he was able to pass a 
teacher's examination and secure a 
certificate for teaching. He taught his 
first term of school in 1890, at the age 
of nineteen, and contiuued teaching 
for fifteen years, missing but one term 
during the entire time. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Sallie A. Wills in 1893, 
and to this union has been born seven 
sons, B. Wilson, J. Rodney, F. Ray, 
Wallace C , Curtis G., John T., and 
Charles Boyd. Elder Power and wife 
united with the Little Capon Primi- 
tive Baptist Church in October, 1906, 
and were baptized by his father — Eld- 
er B. W. Power. He was licensed to 
preach in 1907, and is now serving 
three churches, Bethel, Gt. Capon, 
and Enon, all in West Virginia. 




REES PRATHER. 

Prather, Elder Rees, of West Point, 
Ga. This zealous and humble brother 
was born November 8, 1857, obtained 
a well grounded hope in Christ in his 
fifteenth year and united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Emmaus 
Troup County, Ga. His gift was soon 
discovered. He was licensed to preach 
in May, 1884, and was ordained to 
the full functions of the gospel minis- 
try April 4, 1890. Elder Prather has, 
since his ordination, has had the care 
of several churches, and is dearly be- 
hoved by the people who know him 

best. 

J. D. H. PRICE. 

Price, Elder J. D. H., of Greencastle, 
Mo., serves churches in the Hazel 
Creek Association. The editor, howev- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



219 



er, failed to secure data from which 
to prepare a suitable sketch of Elder 
Price's life and labors. 




WILLIAM PRIEST. 

Priest, Elder William (1808-1892), 
of Mo. The subject of this memoir 
was born in Fauquier County, Va., and 
was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
H. Payne of the same state in Janu- 
ary, 1830, and emigrated to Ralls 
County, Mo., in the year of 1832, and 
engaged in the vocation of farming. 
In 1846, at the earnest solicitation of 
the citizens from the counties com- 
posing the senatorial district, he con- 
sented to become a candidate, and 
served them for four years with dis- 
tinction and ability, and was the peer 
of any of his colleagues. In February, 

1852, having been made by God's 
spirit to realize that he was a justly 
and truly condemned sinner, and by 
God's grace enabled to see that He 
for Christ's sake had pardoned his 
sins, presented himself to the Old 
School Baptist Church called Flint 
Hill in Ralls County, and was receiv- 
ed into their fellowship. In February, 

1853, against his strong protest, the 
church licensed him to preach, and 
in August of the same year he was 
ordained by Elders William Davis, 
Chas. L. Turner, Timothy Rogers and 
M. Moore. He was soon called to the 
pastoral charge of four churches, 
which he continued to faithfully serve 
until stricken down with his last ill- 
ness, a period of nearly forty years. 
He attended these churches regularly 
unless prevented by something be- 



yond human power to avoid. Much of 
the time he traveled on horseback one 
of the churches being a distance of 
more than forty miles from his home, 
but he cheerfully performed this sol- 
emn duty to which his Maker had 
called him, not for the sake of emolu- 
ment or the laudation and praise of 
mankind, but for the love and honor 
of God, and for the comfort of his 
people whom he so delighted to serve. 
As an expounder of the Scriptures, 
he stood without an equal in North- 
east Missouri. But few ministers ever 
possessed the faculty of retaining the 
attention of an audience so closely. 
In 1875, at the urgent request of the 
citizens of Ralls and Shelby counties, 
he consented to become a member of 
the convention for framing a new con- 
stitution for the state of Missouri, and 
was unanimously elected without even 
leaving his home to make a canvass. 
He was an active member of the judi- 
ciary committee, and to his mature 
judgment and keen foresight are we 
indebted for many wise measures in 
our present constitution, and likewise 
through his influence many obnoxious 
ones were eliminated. In the year of 
1872 the county of Ralls, having be- 
come almost hopelessly involved 
through the contracting of railroad 
debts, he was chosen as Presiding 
Judge of the county, and after serving 
them faithfuly for four years, he 
brought the affairs of the county out 
of its chaotic state and placed its 
credit on a firm basis. He retired to 
private life and refused to again serve 
in office, although being strongly im- 
portuned by leading citizens from all 
over the state to consent to become a 
candidate for governor. During all of 
his active public career he never for- 
got or neglected that duty which the 
Divine Maker had enjoined upon him 
— to preach the unsearchable riches 
of His grace to a dying and sinful 
world. 



JOHN F. PRIEST. 

Priest, Elder John F., of Marshall, 
Va., was born in Paris, a little village 
in Fauquier County, Va., March 20, 
1855, received a hope in the Saviour 
in 1807, united with the Old School 
Baptists at Gourdvine Church in Rap- 
pahannock County, August, 187G, and 
was baptized by Elder John K. Boot- 
on. Some years later he moved his 
membership to Barrows Run Church 
where he was in 1902 licensed to 
preach and in January, 1905, ordained 



220 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



by Elders J. A. Norton and G. W. 
Lowe. Elder Priest now has the care 
of two churches in the bounds of the 
Ketocton Association. 




JOHN PRITCHARD. 

Pritchard, Elder John (1821-1904), 
of Ohio. This eminent minister was 
the oldest son of a family of sixteen 
children and was born in Licking 
County, 0. His parents were Guilford 
and Jane G. (Cook) Pritchard and 
moved from Culpepper County, Va., 
about 1817. Elder Pritchard obtained 
a hope in Christ in his nineteenth 
year, united with the Lost Run (Now 
St. Louisville) Church in 1843, was 
licensed to preach January, 1849, and 
ordained 1854, by Elders John Fry, 
Minor McQueen and Amos Farmer, 
and for fifty years proved a faithful 
under-shepherd. He served St. Louis- 
ville Church fifty years, Pleasant 
Hill thirty-two, Beulah forty, Goshen 
twenty-five and Mt. Pisgah thirty-five 
years. For five years he served Lick- 
ing Association as moderator and for 
twenty-six years was moderator of the 
Muskegum Association. He attended 
over eight hundred funerals, married 
over seven hundred couples and bap- 
tized over one thousand persons, and 
was indeed a father in Israel. In his 
twenty-third year of age he was hap- 
pily married to Miss Mary Coffman 
who was indeed a true companion, and 
survived him three years. A kind 
neighbor, true friend, a good father, 
affectionate husband, a good citizen 
and faithful man of God he died in his 
eighty-second year as he had lived — 
trusting God and looking to him for 
salvation. 



G. W. PUCKETT. 

Puckett, Elder G. W., of Elmwood, 
La., is moderator of the Louisiana 
Bithynia Primitive Baptist Associa- 
tion and it is with regret that suffi- 
cient data for an extended notice of 
his life and labors could not be ob- 
tained. 




J. H. PUREFOY. (M. D.) 

Purefoy, Elder J. H. (M. D.), of 

Furman, Ala.,, was born at Snow Hill, 
Wilcox County, Ala., September the 
9th, 1837, and died at his residence 
in the community of his birth, Novem- 
ber 22, 1908. His spiritual birth dates 
from his sixteenth year. He joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Snow 
Hill, Ala., in his eighteenth year, 
where his parents were members 
many years before him. Elder Purefoy 
began preaching when about thirty- 
eight years old, served as pastor of 
churches five years, and as an evan- 
gelist about thirteen years, devoting 
his whole time to it. He traveled and 
preached through all the southern and 
middle states and a portion of Canada 
and Michigan. While serving churches 
in pastoral work he supported himself 
and family by his own labor, but as an 
evangelist the voluntary contribution 
of brethren and friends afforded him 
and his family ample support, so that 
they lacked nothing in temporal 
things. His literary training was re- 
ceived in the schools of his communi- 
ty, and in 1859, when twenty-two 
years of age, he graduated in medicine 
from the Jefferson Medical College, in 
Pennsylvania, and immediately began 
the practice of medicine in his home 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



221 



village. He enlisted in the Confederate 
(States) Army, in 1861, and was as- 
signed to duty as surgeon in the 44th 
Alabama Regiment, filling his post to 
the close of the war with perfect 
satisfaction to all concerned. Return- 
ing home at the close of the war 
he resumed the practice of medicine 
at his native village and soon became 
one of the most popular practitioners 
in all his section of the state, during 
all of which time he was an active 
church member. After a few years he 
gave up the practice of medicine and 
gave himself to the ministry until his 
health broke down some twelve years 
ago. In every relationship of life Dr. 
Purefoy was a notable faithful man. 
As a physician, he was prompt, wise, 
sympathetic, and merciful. As a sol- 
dier he was brave, loyal and kind; 
as a husband and father, he was pas- 
sionately fond of his family, and pro- 
vided for them well, as a Christian 
and member of the church, he was 
pious, always at his post, brotherly, 
wise in counsel, and liberal with his 
means; as a preacher, he was sound 
in doctrine, loyal to the book, clear in 
statements, fervent in spirit, and 
deeply reverent in his demeanor. 
When Elder E. H. Burram began to 
advocate publicly the doctrine of re- 
generation through the written and 
preached word, followed by his pleas 
for toleration while at the same time 
pressing his Armenian practices, Eld- 
er Purefoy was one of the first to warn 
the Baptists of the Ketocton and 
Ebenezer Associations against these 
things and to publicly condemn this 
heresy. And hundreds of Baptists of 
Virginia, who passed through the divi- 
sion of 1890 still remember the bold 
defense of their cause by this faithful 
soldier and will ever honor and love 
his memory. 

WILLIAM J. PURINGTON. 



character were in striking accord with 
the doctrine he held, loved and preach- 
ed. His labors in the ministry fully 
sustained the confession which he 
made unto salvation and unto his call 
to preach the unsearchable riches of 
Christ. He was bold in the faith, able 
and fearless in proclaiming the sincere 
convictions of an honest heart, and en- 
tertained no manner of compromise for 
what he esteemed as the fundamental 
principles of truth. His bearing was 
grave his manner fatherly, his pres- 
ence was commanding, and yet endeai*- 
ing, his conversation was instructive in 
doctrine, in discipline, in love and in 
good works, and his counsels were 
pointed, timely and wholesome. He 
possessed the sternness and inflexibil- 
ity of man, the gentleness and ten- 
derness of woman, and the meekness, 
humbleness and simplicity of a little 
child." For a number of years and at 
the time of his death he was the be- 
loved pastor of Hopewell Church in 
New Jersey — now served by Elder 
F. A. Chick. 




JOSEPH L. PURINGTON. 



Purington, Elder William J., of New 
Jersey. The editor regrets that a com- 
plete sketch of the life and labors of 
this gifted man of God could not ap- 
pear. However, we give below Elder 
P. G. Lester's opinion of him which 
was published in Zion's Landmark 
some years ago. Elder Lester says: 
"In his death the church has sustain- 
ed the loss of one of the ablest minis- 
ters of the New Testament of this 
day and generation and perhaps any 
other generation since the days of in- 
inspiration. He was wonderfully gift- 
ed of God, and was one of the few who 
seemed to be evidently set for the 
defense of the gospel. His life and 



Purington, Elder Joseph L„ depart- 
ed this life January 3, 1S75, aged fifty- 
four years, four months and twenty- 
eight days. He was ordained in Maine 
in September, 1841. He spent several 
years in Georgia, where he served a 
number of churches. He moved to Al- 
exandria, March 31, 1870, where he 
had the pastoral care of six churches. 
During the four years that he resided 
in Alexandria he baptized one hun- 
dred and twenty-four persons. The 
circumstances of his death were pecu- 
liar. On Tuesday evening, January 2, 
Elder Bartley had preached in the hall 
where the church met for worship, 
and Elder Purington followed with 



222 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



some remarks, appearing much elated 
in his mind, and remarked, as he had 
a few days previous, that he wished, if 
according to God's will, that he might 
die at his post. He then read hymn 
No. 962, Beebe's collection, which was 
sung, and the service of the evening 
closed. In three or four minutes he 
complained of being very sick and 
sat down, when with the assistance he 
walked into another room, where he 
passed away on Thursday. His desire 
was granted, for he died at his post. 
He expired in the building where he 
had so many times preached the gos- 
pel of the Son of God. Elder Puring- 
ton was a gifted preacher and greatly 
loved by those among whom he la- 
bored. 

T. K. PURSLFY. 

Pursley, Elder T. K., of Georgia. 
This A\ell known minister of Georgia 
was born in South Carolina in 1810, 
raised by Presbyterian parents and 
joined their church, but rinding that 
the doctrine preached by them did not 
agree with his experience he became 
dissatisfied, and after much conflict 
of mind and sorrow of heart left his 
former friends and united with the 
Primitive Baptists, even against the 
wishes of his mother. She and others 
would try to show him that to do so 
would be to throw himself away, for 
said they, "these are ignorant people." 
But God had a work for him, brought 
him to see the truth as it is in Jesus, 



and gave him a love for those who 
contended for the doctrine and prac- 
tice of the apostolic church. He was 
soon licensed, and afterwards ordain- 
ed to preach. His first attempt to pro- 
claim Jesus, the way, the truth and 
the life, was about 1833, near York- 
ville, S. C. From that time until his 
death he traveled thousands of miles 
in different states preaching salvation 
by grace. Sometime after his ordina- 
tion he settled in Georgia, near An- 
dersonville, and lived in this state the 
balance of his earthly pilgrimage and 
died at a ripe old age in the full tri- 
umph of faith. 



JOHN W. PURVIS. 

Purvis, Elder John W., of North 
Carolina, son of Gabriel and Galitha 
Purvis, was born in Martin County, 
North Carolina, August 5, 1811, and 
died May 25, 1880. He was blessed 
with a hope in the Saviour and united 
with the Primitive Baptist at Conoho 
Church, Martin County, in 1851, and 
baptized by Elder Blount Cooper. A 
few years later he was licensed by 
his home church to preach and in Jan- 
uary, 1860, was ordained to the full 
work of the gospel ministry by Elders 
C. B. Hassell and Martin Ross. Elder 
Purvis proved his love for the cause 
of God and truth by faithfully deliver- 
ing the doctrine of God our Saviour 
and by a godly walk and conversa- 
tion. 



Q 




B. F. QUERRY. 

Querry, Elder B. F., of Wilton, 
Boone County, Mo., was born in Ray 



County, Mo., November 4, 1846. 
Though young he served in the war 
between the states in Co. B. 13th Mo. 
Vol. Cavalry. In 1868 he professed a 
hope in Jesus, united with the Primi- 
tive Baptists at States' Creek Church 
and was baptized by Elder John Tur- 
nage. He began preaching in 1870, and 
in March, 1871, was ordained to the 
gospel ministry by Elders Wm. Jones, 
John Turnage and Anderson Jones. He 
has since served several churches in 
Missouri and Illinois; has done much 
evangelistic work, and has baptized 
about one thousand persons. He lived 
in Raymond, HI, twenty-one years, 
then moved to Boone County, Mo., and 
took charge of Goshen and Rocky 
Fork churches, and in one year's time 
baptized in Goshen church alone over 
one hundred persons. Elder Querry is 
sound in the faith, able in defense, 
and has engaged in one or two public 
discussions; is a close Bible student, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



223 



a profound reasoner, tender exhorter 
and a wise sheep and lamb feeder. 
Though gifted, he does not strive for 
the mastery, but confesses himself a 
sinner, feels to be little and desires to 
give God all the glory. 



J. M. QUILLAN. 

Quillan, Elder J. M., of Jessee, Va., 
has the care of churches in the Stony 
Creek Association of Primitive Bap- 
tists and is also the beloved modera- 
tor of this body. A full sketch of his 
life could not be obtained. 



R 




CHAS. W. RATCLIFF. 

Ratcliff, Elder Chas. W., of Mt. Ver- 
non, Ind. This able, humble and useful 
minister of the New Testament was 
born in Washington County, Septem- 
ber 23, 1856. In his eleventh year of 
age he united with the Primitive Bap- 
tists at Unity Church of Washington 
County, and in his thirty-third year of 
age — in 1889 — he was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry. Since that 
time Elder Ratliff has had the care of 
from three to six churches, and is at 
present serving four. He is highly es- 
teemed among his brethren for his 
faithful defense of the truth and la- 
bors of love, and has ever stood firm 
in the advocacy of the doctrine of God 
our Saviour and the practices of the 
apostolic church as maintained by the 
Primitive or Old School Baptist. 



R. O. RAULSTON. 

Raulston, Elder R. O., of South 
Pittsburg, Tenn., son of Evander M. 
Raulston, was born on a farm in Ma- 
rion County, Tenn., December 22, 



185C. His mother, Barbara Beene, sis- 
ter to Elder Samuel Beene, is de- 
scended from the first settlers of 
Tenn. Elder Raulston obtained a hope 
when young and at the age of sixteen 
was baptized by Elder Samuel Beene. 
As it was a very cold day they broke 
ice on the creek in order that he 
might be baptized. When a young 
man he spent two years in Texas but 
returned home and joined Sweetens 
Cove Church and was afterwards 
married to Miss Rhoda Payne in 
1881. Six children were born to 
them, four girls and two boys. He 
served as church clerk for a num- 
ber of years and was ordained dea- 
non some years before his ordina- 
tion as elder. He has now (1908) been 
clerk of his association, Sequachee 
Valley, for twelve years. He was or- 




R. O. RAULSTON 

dained to the work of the ministry by 
the church at South Pittsburg, Tenn., 
in November, 1903, the presbytery 
consisting of Elders A. J. Willis, M. A. 
Hackworth, J. G. Woodfin, and L. I. 
Pettus. He has never missed a meet- 
ing of his association in about twenty- 
six years; and before his ordination 



224 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



he was always in attendance at his 
own church meetings and usually at- 
tended the meetings of the other 
churches within reach, often walking 
to churches ten or fifteen miles dis- 
tant. Since his ordination he has been 
serving three and four churches. He 
has followed various occupations and 
has filled the office of justice of the 
peace in his county for years. Elder 
Raulston is devoted to the cause of 
Christ, defending the purity of the 
church in its apostolic doctrine and 
practices. 



EVANDER M'KEVER RAULSTON. 

Raulston, Elder Evander McKever, 
of Tennessee, son of James and Jane 
Raulston, was born on Caney Fork 
River in Middle Tennessee, September 
1, 1818. The greater part of his life 
Avas spent in Marion County, Tenn., 
where he was married to Miss Bar- 
bara Beene in 1841. He united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church in Au- 
gust, 1846, and lived a devoted mem- 
ber until his death which occurred 
October 22, 1870. Elder Raulston's 
ministerial work was very short as 
his ordination occurred only about a 
year before his death; and for a great 
part of that time his rapidly failing 
health prevented his going away from 
home. He attended the meetings of 
his home church, however, until he 
was no longer strong enough to be 
conveyed to the church. 




A. L. RAY. 

Ray, Elder A. L., of Baker Hill., 
Ala., was born in Barbour County, 



Ala., February 28, 1857. At the age of 
sixteen he united with the Missionary 
or New School Baptist Church and 
remained with them twenty years. 
Having become dissatisfied with their 
doctrine and practice he united with 
the Primitive Baptists at County Line 
Church in August, 1897, and was in 
October following ordained to the 
work of the ministry. Elder Ray has, 
since his ordination, had the care of 
from three to four churches and has 
by his faithful life and earnest labors, 
proven his love for the cause of truth, 
and can truthfully sing: 

"I love thy kingdom, Lord; 

The house of thine abode, 

The church our blessed Redeemer 
bought 

With His own precious blood." 



H. J. REDD. 

Redd, Elder H. J., of Avondale, Ala., 
was born in Tuscaloosa County, Ala., 
November 17, 1848, raised on a farm 
and had but few advantages of an ed- 
ucation, or of attending the services 
of any church — never hearing preach- 
ing but three times before his fif- 
teenth year — and united with the Mis- 
sionary or New School Baptists when 
about this age. Not feeling they were 
his people after hearing the Primitive 
Baptists he united with the latter 
when twenty-two years old and was 
baptized by Elder J. D. Chandler. In 
1885 he was ordained to the ministry 
by EMers W. S. Norris and J. J. 
Akers. Moving from one locality to 
another has made it necessary for 
him to belong to several churches dur- 
ing which time he has served several 
charges and is now pastor of the 
church at Bessimer, Ala., and has 
served as clerk of Pilgrim's Rest As- 
sociation for six years and clerk of 
the Olive Association about the same 
time. Elder Redd is a strong writer 
and is firm in the doctrine and prac- 
tice of the apostolic church. Though 
for many years he has suffered much 
bodiiy affliction yet he has desired to 
be found in duty's pathway and feels 
to say that God's grace has sustained 
him amid all trials and tem'ptations of 
his earthly pilgrimage. 



J. W. REDDICK. 

Reddick, Elder J. W. (1836-1895), of 
Kentucky, was born in Sumner Coun- 
ty, Tenn., married to Mary W. Par- 
rish in Hopkins County, Ky., Decem- 
ber, 1855, and in the afternoon of Sep- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



225 



tember 13, 1872, while in his room at 
home (after months of deep convic- 
tion), while singing "All Hail the 
Power of Jesus Name," was brought 
from darkness unto light and made to 
realize in the fullest sense that it was 
the "gift of God" that he was saved, 
and ever afterward his daily walk 
and conversation attested the fact 
that divine grace had wrought in his 
inner heart and life a deep and abid- 
ing change. He was baptized into the 
fellowship of East Station Camp 
Church by Elder John Petty in 
1873. Soon thereafter he felt called 
upon to teach the word of God and be- 
came an able exponent of the doc- 
trine advocated by the Primitive Bap- 
tists. Although making no loud pre- 
tentions,, his daily walk, his quiet 
manifestations of brotherly kindness, 
love for the church and love for God 
and the cause of Christ was sufficient 
to command the utmost confidence of 
all who knew him. He died quietly, 
peacefully and with a perfect resigna- 
tion, trusting alone in Jesus for salva- 
tion. 




S. N. REDFORD. 



Redford, Elder S. N., of Valley 
Springs, Texas, was born in Washing- 
ton County, November 20, 1872, pro- 
fessed a hope in Christ July, 1894, and 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Valley Springs, F'ebruary, 
1896. His gift was soon manifested to 
the church, and he was ordained to 
the ministerial work July, 1900, and 
has since been spending from one- 
third to one-half of his time in serving 
the dear people of God. Elder Redford 
is pastor of two churches — one at 



Austin and one at Georgetown, Texas, 
loves the cause of truth and is a zeal- 
ous worker in his Master's vineyard. 




CHARLES MELLETT REED. 

Reed, Elder Charles Meilett (1846- 
1906), son of Thomas and Sarah A. 
Reed, was born in Hancock County, 
Ind. The Lord in his great love and 
mercy prepared Brother Reed for His 
kingdom and service, and according 
to his profession of a good hope 
through grace he was received into 
the fellowship of Lebanon Church of 
Primitive Baptists, situated in Henry 
County, Ind., July, 1864. He was or- 
dained at Rich Hill Church, Bates 
County, Mo., May 3, 1875, as his home 
was then in Missouri, where many 
years of his ministerial life were 
spent. Brother Reed, as a minister of 
the gospel, was highly esteemed for 
his work's sake, an humble, true and 
faithful preacher of God's righteous- 
ness, brought in by Jesus Christ, and 
imputed to sinners for their justifica- 
tion. For this was his hope, his sal- 
vation, his joy. He was kind and for- 
bearing in love with his brethren and 
sisters in the church; but in faithful- 
ness to his adored Saviour he was 
firm in defense of his holy teachings 
and the honor of his bride, the church. 



THOMAS REEDER. 

Reeder, Elder Thomas, of Illinois, 
This earnest and able defender of the 
gospel as it is in Jesus died March 5, 
1899. He was born in Indiana, Decern- 



226 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ber 26, 1841, united with the Primitive 
Baptists in the state of Illinois, in the 
year 1868. In May, 1872, he was or- 
dained to the gospel ministry and was 
soon called to the care of his home 




THOMAS REEDER 

church, and served this and other 
churches, until his death. He was a 
brother of Elder Nathan Reeder. Data 
for a more complete sketch could not 
be obtained. 




NATHAN REEDER. 

Reeder, Elder Nathan, of Caney, 
Kan., was born in Illinois, September 
2, 1845, and united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church in 1865. In the year 
1884 he was ordained to all the func- 
tions of the gospel ministry and has 
since had the care cf churches. He 



has been pastor of his home church 
for twenty-five years and is at present 
Moderator of the Elk River Associa- 
tion. Elder Reeder is an humble and 
useful minister and the editor regrets 
that data for a more extended sketch 
cculd not be obtained. 



JOHN REEDER. 

Reeder, Elder John, of Eldorado, 
111., who fell asleep in Jesus some 
years ago, was born in Illinois, No- 
vember 28, 1854, and united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church in 1888. 
Soon afterwards he was chosen past- 
or of his home church which he serv- 
ed until his death, baptizing more 
than fifty persons in this church in a 
few years. He also had the care of 
other churches, all of which he faith- 
fully served. He was an interesting 
speaker and earnestly contended for 
the faith once delivered unto the 
saints and was highly esteemed 
among his people. 




GILES REEDER. 

Reeder, Elder Giles, of Winchester, 
111., was born in Scott County, 111., No- 
vember 19, 1848, and united with 
Friendship Church, Winchester, 111., in 
November, 1878, where he still has 
membership. He was ordained March 
21, 1891, and is a close Bible student. 
It is with regret that a fuller sketch 
of Elder Reeder could not be obtained 
for this work. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



227 




SIMON REEDER. 

Reeder, Elder Simon, of Morris 
City, 111., was born March 24, 1849, 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church in the twenty-second year 
of his age, was soon licensed, 
and in 1880 was ordained to the full 
work of the gospel ministry. Elder 
Reeder is moderator of Muddy River 
Association of Regular Baptists and 
faithfully serves churches in this as- 
sociation, and is highly esteemed by 
our people. 




F. M. REEDS. 

Reeds, Elder F. M., of Hindsboro, 
111., was born in Edgar County, 111., 
August 13, 1845, married to Miss An- 
geline Lumbrick, 18G8, who has prov- 
en a noble helpmate and who yet 



walks pleasantly beside him along 
life's pathway. He united with the 
Primitive Baptists in 18G9, and began 
speaking in public the same year, and 
was ordained in 1880 at Providence 
Church in Edgar County. Since then 
he has had the care of churches and 
has traveled some among the Baptists, 
and desires to preach Jesus as an all- 
sufficient Saviour. Bro. Reeds is an 
humble, unassuming and useful minis- 
ter. He is a farmer and wields a good 
influence among the people, and has 
served his county in several positions 
of trust. 



WILLIAM J. REEVES. 

Reeves, Elder William J., of Barnes, 
Iowa, was born in Mahaska County, 
Iowa, June 20, 1847, and united with 
Ebenezer Church in June, 1878. He 
was ordained in May, 1889, and has 
served the churches acceptably ever 
since. The editor failed to secure data 
from Elder Reeves for a fuller sketch 
for this work. 



ENOCH REEVES. 

Reeves, Elder Enoch, was born in 
Grayson County, Va., June 18, 1801, 
and died on his birthday, seventy 
years later. In his youth he was care- 
less, thoughtless and reckless, and 
cared nothing for religion, but the 
Lord convicted him of sin and killed 
him to the love of it, and led him to 
the church, which he joined at Elk 
Creek, about 1S3S. He was ordained 
1841, and soon took the pastoral care 
of churches and for about thirty years 
he was zealous in the Master's cause, 
going through heat and cold, wet and 
dry, far and near, preaching the 
sweet theme of salvation by grace. He 
was of a frank, kind and determined 
disposition, a great defender of truth, 
though humble in spirit and appear- 
ance. He was not one to be exalted in 
prosperity or depressed in adversity, 
but saw the hand of God, controlling 
all things. 



LUCIUS REGISTER. 

Register, Elder Lucius, of Florida, 
was born September 3, 1854, and died 
June 5, 1901, at his home in Dover, 
Hillsboro County. He was born in 
Georgia and moved to Florida in early 
manhood, married Miss Mlary Fender 
who proved a life-long devoted com 



228 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



panion; was given a hope in Jesus in 
1881, united with Mt. Enon Church 
and was soon after licensed to preach, 
and in 1886 was ordained by Elders T. 
S. Evers, J. W. Futch and E. Z. Hull. 
He was unassuming in his manners, 
humble in his Christian walk and con- 
versation, a safe counsellor in times 
of trouble and as a minister had the 
confidence of all Baptists who knew 
him and was recognized as an able 
gift to the church. 




J. R. RESPESS. 

Respess, Elder J. R., of Georgia, 
was born in Upson County, October 2, 
1831, and died at his home in Butler, 
Ga., February 4, 1895. As a pupil in 
his early school days, he was bright 
and studious and graduated at the 
University of Georgia, admitted to the 
bar, with every promise of success in 
his chosen profession of law. Some 
years afterwards he was deeply exer- 
cised in mind about his spiritual con- 
dition, was given a hope in the Sav- 
iour, united with Ebenezer Church in 
Upson County, where he was ordained 
by Elders J. Dickey, Cromwell Cleve- 
land and Samuel Bentley. Elder Wl C. 
Cleveland wrote of him: "He was 
graduated with distinction at Franklin 
College, the University of the state, 
in the class of several of Georgia's 
noted sons. He returned home, and 
was soon admitted to the bar with the 
intention, and ability so to do, of hew- 
ing out for himself fame and fortune 
in the things of this life, and soon 
took, as a young lawyer, the front 
rank, with every indication of a bright 
future in his profession. But God will- 
ed with him otherwise; He had for 



him a nobler and better usefulness; 
one in which victory is won through 
suffering and sacrifice. But in so call- 
ing him to a different field of labor, 
it was at no expense of the great 
natural abilities with which He had 
already endowed him; in fact, through 
the Spirit's power they were strength- 
ened, utilized, and constantly grew, 
thereby making his life more and 
more useful to the children of men, 
and adding an additional pillar in the 
great arch of faith. Many a man pos- 
sessed of his natural and spiritual 
abilities, would soon have forgotten 
his high calling, and become vain and 
proud, especially when added to these 
gifts, was the love and admiration of 
all who knew him." As a minister 
Elder W. M. Mitchel says of him: 
"Our dear Bro. Respess was truly a 
man of God and a powerful preacher. 
When in the spirit of preaching it has 
seemed to us that no Christian could 
hear him without feeling the power 
and sweetness of the word of God 
burning in his heart, His preaching 
was in great plainness and simplicity, 
and though he was learned in the 
schools of man, he never made any 
attempt at excellency of speech of 
man's wisdom. We have never known 
a preacher who might have said more 
truthfully, 'My speech and my preach- 
ing is not with enticing words of 
man's wisdom, but in demonstration 
of the Spirit and of power." . Elder 
Respess was the founder, and for 
many years editor and proprietor of 
the Gospel Messenger. Elder S. Has- 
sell who was much associated with 
him and who is now editor and pro- 
prietor of this useful paper, wrote of 
him: "In his conduct and conversa- 
tion he seemed to breathe forth the 
very spirit of Jesus. He wished that 
every other preacher in the world 
were a greater preacher than himself, 
and every other man a better man. 
He was willing to be trampled on by 
the whole church if thereby the name 
of Christ could be exalted. If his ene- 
mies spoke evil of him, he would say, 
'Perhaps it is so,, perhaps it is so,' — 
and he would speak well of them; if 
they deeply injured and wronged him, 
he would astonish me by asribing 
to them the most charitable motives. 
I never knew a wiser, humbler, kind- 
er, gentler, more unselfish, more 
Christ-like person than dear Bro. Res- 
pess. By great and manifold afflic- 
tions, seasoned with Divine grace, his 
spirit was disciplined, softened, sweet- 
ened, and purified, and thus prepared 
for entrance into eternal rest." 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



229 



JAMES REYNOLDS. 

Raynolds, Elder James (1770-1837), 
died at his residence, in the town of 
Hector, County of Tompkins, state of 
New York, in the sixty-seventh year 
of age. Elder Reynolds professed a 
hope in Christ, when about fourteen 
years of age; from that time until his 
last expiring moment, we think it 
might be said, he was a bold soldier 
of the cross. He was among the first 
settlers in the town of Hector, and for 
about thirty years of his life, he 
preached the everlasting gospel of the 
kingdom. During most of this time he 
was pastor of the First Baptist 
Church of Christ, in Hector, which 
was constituted about the time of his 
ordination. Of this venerable servant 
of God, we think it may be said, he 
was not chargeable to any, but labor- 
ed with his hands for his support, and 
for those that were with him. He was 
generally very punctual to attend all 
appointments for preaching, church 
and conference meetings, &c„ travel- 
ing over hills, and through valleys, 
through heat or cold, over a large 
territory, being the only Baptist 
preacher in this place for a number 
of years. 

W. H. RICHARDS. 

Richards, Elder W. H., of Matthews, 
Ind. Tbis noted and highly esteemed 
minister of Jesus was born m tne 
state of Ohio, in 1829, received a hope 
in the Saviour in early youth but did 
not unite with the church until his 
twenty-third year. He was baptized by 
Elder Win. McCormick, and was some 
years afterward ordained to the full 
work of the ministry and has during 
a long and faithful ministry proven 
his love for the cause of God and 
truth. On March 19, 1907, was the 
fiftieth anniversary of Elder Richards' 
marriage to his faithful and loving 
companion and that day was made 
memorable to them and their hearts 
made to rejoice by the many tokens of 
kindness showered on them by about 
one hundred and twenty-five of their 
brethren, relatives and neighbors. 
The editor failed to secure data for 
more complete sketch of this useful 
minister's life and labors. 



JACOB RICHARDS. 

Richards, Elder Jacob (1824-1904), 
The subject of this sketch was born 
in Muskingum County, O., and died at 



his home near Matthews, Grant Coun- 
ty, Ind. When he was nine years old 
his parents moved from Ohio to Grant 
County, Ind., and except three years 
residence in Iowa, just preceding his 
marriage, was a resident of this 
county for seventy-one years. He was 
married to Susan Gillispie in March 
1845, and for more than fifty-six years 
they traveled life's journey together, 
sharing each others joys and bearing 
each others trials with a fidelity and 
devotion seldom witnessed. Brother 
Richards united with the New Har- 
mony Primitive Baptist Church in 
July, 1861, and was elected church 
clerk in September of the same year 
and served in that capacity until he 
was liberated to preach in 1866. He 
was ordained 1873, and was called to 
the pastoral care of this church Jan- 
uary, 1874, and served it as pastor for 
nearly thirty years. With his family 
he was kind and generous, a devoted 
husband, kind and patient in his af- 
flictions. His life was above reproach 
and a testimony of the sincerity of 
his profession. His conversation was 
godly, ever seeking to elevate, in 
struct and comfort rather than amuse 
and gratify the desires of the flesh. 
As a minister he sought not the ap- 
plause of men, but rather the appro- 
bation of the Saviour. He was firmly 
grounded in the faith of the Primitive 
Baptists and earnestly contended for 
the same, yet kind to all who differed 
from him. His preaching was in dem- 
onstration of the Spirit and in power; 
comforting, edifying, binding together 
in love and cementing in sweet fel- 
lowship and union the Lord's scatter- 
ed, doubting, tempest-tossed children. 
His labors were attended with more 
than ordinary success. Called from the 
toils of farm life, as he often said, "poor 
and ignorant" to the work of the gos- 
pel ministry, in much fear and tremb- 
ling and in deep humility of soul, with 
his faith alone in God whose gentle 
Spirit's whisperings he had heard, 
and leaning upon the Saviour's ever- 
lasting arms and his hand in His he 
pressed forward, feeling that he who 
had once put his hands to the plow 
should not look back. And God made 
him a blessing to His cause. Under 
his ministry Harmony Church arose 
from a membership of twenty to near- 
ly a hundred, and is today one among 
the strongest of our churches in Indi- 
ana. With but a few exceptions the 
present membership were all " bap- 
tized by him. He was faithful. Preach- 
ing for them, for nearly thirty years, 
he never left them without a minis- 
ter but once ,and seldom would leave 



230 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



them to attend other meetings. He 
was truly a man of God. He is gone, 
but his works will follow him. "He 
being dead, yet speaketh." His life 
will still be an influence for good 
and his heavenly, comforting words 
will follow many until they too shall 
be called home. 



W. H. RICHARDS. 

Richards, Elder W. H., of Texas. 
This eminent minister was born in 
Johnson County, Texas, June 4, 1861. 
His parents were strict members of 
the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 
and he was brought up in their faith, 
being sprinkled when quite young and 
was outwardly taught religion in their 
Sunday Schools. But his heart was not 
reached, he became a cowboy on the 
western ranches and loved the wild 
and reckless life and the vices and 
follies of the world. However, he was 
not allowed to remain in love with 
sin. God's spirit convicted him of sin 
and killed him to the love of it. He 
was directed to the true church, given 
a love for the Primitive or Old School 
Baptist and united with them in 1897 
and was baptized by Elder R. A. 
Biggs. He was soon set apart to the 
gospel ministry and is a faithful and 
able minister of the New Testament 
His experience and call to the minis- 
try is very interesting reading, it is 
printed in pamphlet form by Elder J. 
G. Webb of Tioga, Texas. 




RICHARDSON. 



Richardson, Elder J. W., of Peters- 
burg, Ind., was born June 24, 1829, 
professed a hope in Christ in his 



twenty-eighth year and united with 
the Primitive Baptists one year later, 
and was baptized by Elder Elihu 
Halcombe. A few years after this he 
was licensed and in 1872 was ordained 
to the full functions of the gospel 
ministry, and has since had the care 
of four churches almost continually. 
His labors have chiefly been confined 
to his native county, Pike, and coun- 
ties adjoining. He has had the care 
of his home church thirty-seven years. 
When he became its pastor its mem- 
bership numbered less than a dozen, 
it now numbers three hundred and 
fifteen. Up to the time the editor ob- 
tained data for this notice — 1907 — 
Elder Richardson had married 1,022 
couples, preached 912 funerals, and 
baptized 2,204 persons. He has, out- 
side of his ministerial duties which 
have been many — served his county 
as justice of the peace eight years, 
clerk of circuit court four years, coun- 
ty treasurer four years and two ses- 
sions in the state legislature. He 
writes me, "I have been a very busy 
man all my life." And indeed his rec- 
ord proves it. He also writes, "When 
I joined the old church I thought it 
the nearest right of any church on 
earth, and I think so yet, and hence 
have done all I could to build it up, 
and expect to continue to do so as 
long as I have breath in my body." 
Elder Richardson is nearly eighty 
years old but has lost none of his 
zeal for the cause of truth, makes it 
a point never to disappoint a congre- 
gation, has never asked for money for 
his preaching and has not sought to 
be what is called a great preacher. He 
is greatly loved by his churches and 
highly esteemed by the citizens of his 
county. 



EDWARD RIENER. 

Riener, Elder Edward, of Georgia. 
This faithful minister was born March 
6, 1805, in Montgomery County and 
died at the ripe old age of eighty-nine. 
He was twice married, first to Miss 
Bettie Meeks, and after her death to 
Miss Emily Bower and was the father 
of fourteen children; united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church called Prov- 
idence in Emmanuel County in his 
thirty-fifth year, and was baptized by 
Elder Archibald Odom. A few years 
after this he was ordained by Elders 
A. Odom and William Norris and con- 
tinued in the faithful discharge of his 
duty as a minister of the gospel for 
more than fifty years. As a man he 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



231 



was the soul of honor; as a citizen, 
law-abiding; as a husband, faithful; 
as a father, indulgent; and as a minis- 
ter, exemplary. He died as he had 
lived, trusting alone in God's mercy 
for salvation and praising Him for 
His goodness. His son, Elder W. W. 
Riener, is following in the footsteps 
of his father. 




W. R. RIGGS. 

Riggs, Elder W. R., of Crab Or- 
chard, Mo., "was born April 2, 1852. 
and united with New Garden Church, 
Ray County, Mo., in 1873, where his 
membership now is. He has been 
preaching since 18S4, and knows noth- 
ing among the churches save Jesus 
and Him crucified. "From Elder Cash's 
book of 1896. Further information 
was not obtainable. 



W. S. RIGGSBY. 

Ribgsgy, Elder W. S., of Mansfield, 
Mo. From information of 1904 date it 
is learned that Elder Riggsby was 
moderator of the Pine Forest Associa- 
tion of Primitive Baptists and pastor 
of churches within the bounds of this 
association. 



EPHRIAM RITTENHOUSE. 

Rittenhouse, Elder Ephriam, of Del- 
aware, was born in the state of 
New Jersey, December 17, 1819. 



He united with the church in 
August, 1847, and began his pub- 
lic work, both of speaking and of 
writing, almost immediately after- 
ward. He was soon licensed to preach, 
and began visiting different churches. 
He was ordained in April, 185G. His 
first call came from the church in 
Wilmington, Delaware, and he began 
serving them, regularly in April of 
1858. During that year three othei 
churches in the same state united in 
the call and in March, 1859, he re- 
moved to Delaware, to the same house 
where he died more than forty years 
afterward. He was never a strong, 
healthy man, but perhaps very few of 
our ministers have gone through more 
hardships in serving the churches than 
he did. One church was located thirty 
miles away, and anoter was fifty miles 
from his home, and for a number of 
years he met his appointments with 
them, usually, by means of a team, 
driving the entire distance once each 
month, through all kinds of weather. 
He was also pastor for some 
years of two churches in the Sal- 
isbury Association, which were near- 
ly one hundred miles from his 
home but he visited them once a 




EPHRIAM RITTENHOUSE 

month. His field of labor was mainly 
in the states of Delaware and Mary- 
land. Although he served so many 
churches, the members were mainly 
poor, and he always found it neces- 
sary to labor with his hands, energet- 
ically, to provide for his family. Was 
always busy and all time not other- 
wise taken up was spent in writing. 
He had a very large private corres- 
pondence besides writing a great numr 
ber of letters for publication on al- 
most every subject that could be 



232 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



thought of. Very few of our ministers 
have written so much as he did. Be- 
ginning with letters to the Signs of 
The Times in 1847, he continued to 
write somewhat regularly for it for 
over fifty years, and since 1880 he 
wrote many letters for three ether 
publications, and this work only ended 
when he was obliged to lay aside his 
pen. When his last published letter 
appeared his sight was so far gone 
that he was unable to read it. A broth- 
er minister once said to him that 
when his pen was laid by a loss would 
be felt in the way of private corres- 
pondence that could never be made 
up to those within its circle; for he 
possessed a special gift in the manner 
of writing comforting, encouraging 
letters, and of speaking the "word in 
season" to those who were "inquiring 
the way." Few such gifts have been 
bestowed on the church, and in this 
respect perhaps no one can fully take 
his place in this generation. After his 
wife's death, in 1885, he had but little 
interest in anything outside of the 
churches, As old age came on the 
hardships of life bore heavily on him, 
and I think if he had known when the 
end was near, he would have said 
that he was glad to have it so. An 
entire generation grew up under his 
ministry. He lived to see both the 
children and the grandchildren take 
the place of the fathers. He left seven 
children, all of them members of the 
church with him. He died October 22, 
1902, and on the stone which marks 
his resting place are the following 
appropriate words: "I have fought a 
good fight; I have finished my course; 
I have kept the faith." Elder Ritten- 
house was regarded as one of our 
most able ministers, one whose 
preaching was always interesting and 
instructive, a man of good judgment 
and wise counsel. 



GEO. D. ROBERSON. 



Roberson, Elder Geo. D., of Rober- 
sonville, N. C, was bora November 
13, 1843, and is of Scotch descent. Be- 
ing the first born of twelve children 
and raised on a farm he grew • up at 
hard labor without much education 
and imbibed, from his father, the idea 
of self support and living at home, 
and during his life has followed farm- 
ing and merchandising when not en- 
gaged in the work of the ministry- 
Though, as a boy, he had serious im- 
pression of death and eternity, yet not 



until he had, at the age of eighteen, 
entered the Southern army in '62 
and realized the providential care of 
God amid the clash of arms and the 
carnage of death, was he brought 
down in feeling to pray for God's con- 
tinued mercy and care, and on his re- 
turn home from the war he felt that 
though he was saved from death he 
was not saved from hell. So he tried 
to prepare himself for heaven, — prom- 
ised the Lord to do better and made 
promises only to break them. But God 
who brought him to see his needs 
supplied them in Jesus and gave him 
faith to look and be healded, and in 
1869 he united with the Primitive 




GEO. D. ROBERSON 

Baptist at Spring Green Church, Mar- 
tin County, N. C., and was baptized by 
Elder C. B. Hassell. Soon he was im- 
pressed with the duty of preaching, 
and for four years was disobedient 
and greatly tried. He felt he could not 
preach — that he was committing a 
great sin — that if it was the Lord's 
work he was committing a sin in not 
complying, and if it was not, he was 
committing a sin in thinking about it. 
But the Lord made him willing and 
opened the way, and he was ordained 
in 1880 by Elders A. N. Hall, R. H. 
Harris and Levi Rogerson. Elder 
Roberson is now serving three 
churches, has traveled and preached 
in eight states and has been favorably 
received. He is an entertaining speak- 
er, is especially gifted in dissecting 
and explaining a subject and applying 
the literal truths of Scripture to the 
experience of Gods children and thus 
bringing water from the rock. Calm, 
deliberate and lucid in style, he is in- 
deed a teacher in Israel sent of God 
and the Lord has blessed his labors. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



233 



THOMAS L. ROBERTSON. 

Robertson, Elder Thomas L., of 
Floyd, Va., was born in Bedford 
County, Va., September 22, 182G. 
When a young man he removed to 
Floyd County, where, in 1849, he mar- 
ried Miss Pernetta Underwood. He 
professed a hope in Christ in 1859, 
and joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Pine Creek Floyd County, 
Va. In 18G1 he began to exercise a 
gift in the ministry, and in 18G3 was 
set apart by ordination to the full 
functions of the gospel. He was called 
to the pastorate of churches and serv- 
ed in that capacity about forty years, 
from which he has for some years 
been retired because of infirmities 
and old age. Elder Robertson's ser- 
vices have been confined to the 
churches locally, and in his active 
days he was faithful in attendance 
and his labors have been favored 
with seals to his ministry. His life 
and character have been wholesome 
for the cause and tending towards 
the peace and prosperity of the 
churches of his labors. In his declin- 
ing years he enjoys the satisfaction of 
quiet repose in the fellowship of his 
brethren and the confidence of the 
people, in which his faithful compan- 
ion fully and worthily shares. During 
his ministry he has baptized over one 
hundred and married over five hun- 
dred couples. 

HARVEY ROGERS. 

Rogers, Eider Harvey. The subject 
of this sketch was born in New Hav- 
en, Conn., in 1809, and died in Canaan, 
Wayne County, Penn., October 14, 
1902, in his ninety-third year. In 1820 
he with his father's family moved to 
Wayne County, Penn., and March 18, 
1834, he received a good hope in 
Christ, and joined the Abington Old 
School Baptist Church. In November 
of the same year he commenced to 
preach and was soon ordained and 
continued faithful till ill health pre- 
vented. A number of years before he 
died he was afflicted with rheumatism 
and had to go en crutches. He had a 
good memory and perhaps there were 
few that knew the Bible better than 
he. He was firm in his belief, contend- 
ing earnestly for the faith once deliv- 
ered to the saints. For fifty years his 
preaching was salvation by grace, not 
of the works of men's inventions. He 
stood firm in all the troubles and di- 
visions that have taken place in the 
churches. 



J. C. ROGERS. 

Rogers, Elder J. C., was born July 
15, 1844, and died at the home of his 
daughter, Mrs. Clara Underwood, 
near Quitman, Ga., June 20, 1893. He 
was baptized into the fellowship of the 
Primitive Baptists in 1S78, and was 
ordained a deacon in 1879, in which 
position he served faithfully and 
well; but soon he began to exercise 
in public, and was ordained to the 
work of the ministry in 1883. From 
that time until his death, his time 
was mostly spent among his brethren, 
preaching Jesus and exhorting the 
saints to love and good works. His 
faithful service bore much fruit. His 
churches were usually peaceful, 
healthy and prosperous. Our people 
knew his worth, and I hope and be- 
lieve appreciated his labors, and they 
now feel that in his death they have 
lost a true and tried friend — one who 
was always in touch with all their sor- 
rows, and who could always offer a 
word of comfort and cheer. When his 
beloved wife was taken from him, 
December, 1892, he plainly manifested 
that every vestige of earthly comfort 
was gone from him forever, and ex- 
pressed a desire to follow her in 
death. Having no small children, he 
closed the doors of his pleasant home 
at Calhoun, Ga., and following his im- 
pressions traveled from church to 
church almost continually until his 
death. During his last illness, and 
even while his mind was in a semi- 
conscious state, he would talk and 
preach about Jesus and His love. 



MATTHEW ROGERS. 

Rogers, Elder Matthew (1763-1843), 

of Kentucky, was well known to the 
Baptists in his day as a gifted preach- 
er, for upwards of thirty years, during 
which time he maintained a high 
standing among them as an honest 
and upright man and a Christian. His 
hope in the Lord Jesus Christ remain- 
ed firm and unshaken to the last. 



LEVI ROGERSON. 

Rogerson, Elder Levi (1819-1894), of 
North Carolina, was born in Martin 
County, N. C., grew up to manhood 
without any advantages of an educa- 
tion — going to school but three days — 
was wild and reckless and cared not 



234 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



for hell or heaven. But God had a 
work for him to do. Afflictions were 
sent upon him. He lost his eyesight 
and was brought down very low. But 
God restored him and he set about to 
reform himself, and became a Phar- 
isee — trusting in his works. About this 
time he became acquainted with the 
Methodist people and fellowshipped 
their view of self-righteousness and 
says he would have joined them but 
for inconvenience. But God taught 
him his exceeding depravity, convict- 
ed him of sin, and then took his feet 
from its mirey clay, established his 
goings, put a new song in his mouth, 
even praise to the God of all grace, 
He united with Smithwicks Church, 
1853, and was baptized by Elder Wm. 
Whitley. Soon he was deeply impress- 
ed with the duty of preaching Jesus, 
but on account of being unable to 
read much, he felt that to become a 
minister was a matter impossible. 
But he was taught in the school of 
experience, and "Whale College" and 
by studying to be approved, became a 
workman that needed not be ashamed. 
He was in 1804 ordained by Elders C. 
B. Hassell and Wm. B. Perry and to 
the end of his useful life was a faith- 
ful pastor of churches — preaching 
Jesus in demonstration of the spirit 
and power of God. 




JOHN N. ROGERSON. 

Rogerson, Elder John N., of Wash- 
ington, Beaufort County, N. C, was 
born in Martin County, N. C, January 
16, 1850, convicted of sin and given a 
hope in Jesus, united with the Primi- 
tive Baptists in 1879, and was baptized 



by Elder Levi Rogerson. In 1884 he 
was licensed and two years later was 
ordained by Elders Levi Rogerson, 
Henry Peel and J. L. Ross. Elder Rog- 
erson has since had the care of 
churches and is a noble, good man. 
His labors have been mostly confined 
to his own churches by whom he is 
loved and highly esteemed. The editor 
regrets that data for a more complete 
sketch could not be obtained. 



WILLIAM A. ROSS. 

Ross, Elder William A. (1822-1897), 
of North Carolina, was born in Pitt 
County, N. C, united with the church 
at Great Swamp, 1849, and was bap- 
tized by Elder Lanier Griffin; was 
licensed to exercise his gift 1851 and 
ordained to the full work of the gos- 
pel ministry 1853, by Elders John H. 
Daniel and Lanier Griffin. His life was 
one of usefulness to the church and 
the cause of truth. He was able and 
strong in the doctrine of the grace of 
God and felt that he was set for the 
defense of the gospel and shunned not 
to declare all the counsel of God, and, 
no doubt many thought used the 
sword of the spirit unmercifully. He 
was very active as a minister and 
traveled much abroad, especially keep- 
ing up the correspondence between 
his own Association and Union meet- 
ings and those of others; also labor- 
ing extensively among the churches. 
He was tender and devotional in feel- 
ing and greatly enjoyed good preach- 
ing by others. The Lord made him an 
able minister of the New Testament 
and he was a faithful servant until 
the end. 



L. SYLVESTER ROSS. 

Ross, Elder L. Sylvester, of North 
Carolina, was born in Beaufort Coun- 
ty, April 15, 1833. He was the young- 
est of five children. His father was 
Elder Lemuel Ross who was a faithful 
minister and pastor of/ several 
churches. His mother's maiden name 
was Nancy Bowen, the daughter of 
Elder John Boven. He was brought to 
see his sinful and lost condition when 
about the age of sixteen and his won- 
derful experience has been an evi- 
dence to him of his interest in 
Jesus and a comfort to others. He 
joined the Primitive Baptist Church 
1882, and was baptized by Elder Al- 
bert Cartwright. Four years later he 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



235 



was ordained and continued to preach 
until his death, serving Beulah and 
South Mattamuskeet churches as pas- 
tor for many years, and was an able, 
faithful minister. He died in 1903. 




J. C. ROSS. 

Ross, Elder J. C., of Greenfield, 
Tenn., was born in Hickman County, 
Ky., January 13, 18G2. His parents 
were devoted members of the Old 
School Baptist Church and while they 
taught him to do right they could not 
teach him to hate wrong. But God be- 
came his teacher also and killed him 
to the love of sin, convicted him of 
his lost and ruined condition and in 
August, 1883, gave him a sweet hope 
in Jesus. He did not tarry but went 
home to his friends at Rock Spring 
Church, Fulton County, Ky., Septem- 
ber, 1883, was received and baptized 
by Eider K. M. Wyatt. At the time he 
received a hope in the Saviour he was 
impressed to preach Him to others. 
This desire never left him but a feel- 
ing sense of his inability was also con- 
tinually with him and he was not or- 
dained until September, 1895; Elders 
K. M. Wyatt, R. H. Boaz, J. H. Yates, 
R. T. Helm and W. I. Cornell consti- 
tuting the presbytery, since which 
time Elder Ross has had the care of 
from two to four churches. His ser- 
vices have been blessed of the Lord 
and he feels encouraged to press on 
in the strength of Him who has called 
him to the work. Feeling his attention 
has been required among the churches 
of his care he has not traveled much 
among other churches. Elder Ross is 
an humble and faithful minister and 
desires to contend alone for the doc- 
trine of God our Saviour and the prac- 
tice of the apostolic church. 




ROBERT ROWE. 



Rowe, Elder Robert (1833-1896), 
This dear brother and fatihful servant 
of God, was born near Liverpool, Eng., 
and died at his home in Andrew Coun- 
ty, near Savannah, Mo. His parents 
moved to Canada when he was six 
years of age, and at the age of four- 
teen years he moved to the state of 
Wisconsin. He moved to Missouri at 
the age of 23 years, obtained a hope 
in Christ at the age of ten, joined the 
First Nodaway Church, of the Noda- 
way Association of Primitive Baptists 
of Missouri, many years ago and was 
baptized by Elder Elijah Moore. He 
served the church as deacon for a 
number of years, was liberated to talk 
in public in 1882,, and ordained in 1888. 
The Bible was his text book and few 
men understood its teachings better 
than he. As a minister he had a rare 
and happy gift and his preaching 
was highly appreciated by his breth- 
ren. He was faithful and zealous and 
devoted his time and talent as much 
as was possible to the work of his 
ministry. He was of a meek anu quiet 
spirit, a kind and obliging neighbor. 
As a citizen he was faithful, patriotic 
and law abiding, as a husband he was 
affectionate and devoted, and as a 
father he was kind and indulgent. He 
bore his affliction with great patience, 
with a desire to be reconciled to the 
will of God. He calmly and affection- 
ately made every needful disposition 
of his earthly estate to the best inter- 
ests of his family, and died in the 
triumph of a good hope, through 
grace, of a better life. 



236 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 




JOHN ROWE. 

Rowe, Elder John (1852-1899), ol 
North Carolina, eldest son of John T. 
and Penlope Rowe, was born in Beau- 
fort County, N. C. His parents were 
members and his father a deacon in 
the Primitive Baptist Church and he 
early in life, manifested love for Bap- 
tist ministers, who were frequently at 
his father's house. He always held his 
parents in high esteem, and though he 
was wild and mischievous with other 
boys, they learned that they could 
place the most implicit confidence in 
what he told them — that same love 
for truth that was marked in his 
character through life having been 
implanted in him at that early age, 
As soon as he could read, the Bible 
was his favorite book, and he read it 
much with close attention, so that it 
was very useful to him in after life. 
He was convicted of sin and converted 
to the knowledge of the truth as it is 
in Christ Jesus in early youth, joined 
the Primitive Baptist Church in 
1869, and was baptized by Elder I. 
Jones. The church, seeing evidences 
of his ministerial gift, gave him li- 
cense to preach in 1873, and in 1875 he 
was ordained to the full work of the 
ministry by Elders A. Jones and B. 
Whitford. In 1877, he was married to 
Miss Nancy L. Hardy, and as a min- 
ister's wife she had few equals. He 
was early called on to serve churches 
in pastoral relationship and different 
churches were added to the number 
of his charges until at the time of his 
death he was pastor of seven 
churches — one in the Kekukee, one 
in the White Oak and five in the Con- 
tentnea Associations. Two of those 
churches were so situated as to re- 



quire nearly one hundred miles travel 
in a sail boat at each visit. Some of 
the others were long distances from 
him, so that it was necessary for 
much of his time to be spent travel- 
ing to and from those churches. All 
those churches will certify to his great 
faithfulness. Elder Rowe was not only 
one of the most gifted ministers of 
his state but was also a man of in- 
fluence as a citizen. He served in the 
legislature of his state with distinc- 
tion during the sessions of 1893 and 
'94, and in all the relations of life 
was a true man — one of nature's no- 
blemen. 




JOSHUA T. ROWE. 

Rowe, Elder Joshua T., of Balti- 
more, Md., was born April 12, 1858, in 
Beaufort County, N. C, convicted of 
sin in his seventeenth year and given 
a sweet hope in Jesus as his personal 
saviour. He was also made to love the 
Primitive Baptists as he had never 
done before, though he was raised by 
Baptist parents, and in 1876 he united 
with the Sandy Grove Church and was 
baptized by Elder Bryan Whitford. 
The sweet peace of mind he received 
at his baptism was, within a month 
thereafter, disturbed by impressions 
to preach. For sometime he fought 
against this duty and suffered great 
anguish of mind, but he was encour- 
aged by Elders John Rowe and L. H. 
Hardy to bear the cross and sustained 
by God's grace, and was ordained to 
gospel work in 1882 by Elders N. H. 
Harrison and J. E. Adams. Elder 
Rowe has since had the care of 
churches continuously and has travel- 
ed and preached among the churches 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



237 



in eastern North Carolina, Delaware, 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New 
York. He is now serving the Ehenezer 
Church in Baltimore City, the Shiloh 
Church in Washington, D. C, and the 
Black Rock Church in Baltimore 
County, Md. The latter named is of his 
toric interest, it being the church in 
which the Baptists met in 1832 and 
declared non-fellowship for the many 
innovations in doctrine and practice 
brought in by the Arminian element 
of the denomination. Here the lines 
were tightly drawn and the religious 
body, until that time, bearing the 
name of Baptist, became known as 
New School and Old School Baptists. 
Elder Rowe is an able minister, a 
lover of peace, and desires to feed the 
flock of God with the sincere milk of 
the word, — not to strive about words 
that genders strife but to "speak that 
we do know and testify that we have 
seen." He feels that the Baptists, 
generally, among whom he has labor- 
ed are better to him than he deserves 
and desires to serve them better. 




J. J. ROWLAND. 

Rowland, Elder J. J., of Santa Fe, 
Kan., "was born in Morgan County, 
111., April 14, 182G. He joined Cedar 
Creek Church, Wapello County, Iowa, 
in May, 1861, and was ordained in 
June, 1875. He has served actively as 
pastor of churches for twenty-one 
years, but has charge of but one 
church at this time, there being but 



tew Baptists near his home." This 
sketch of Elder Rowland is from Eld- 
er Cash's book of 1896, and later in- 
formation could not be secured. 



STEPHEN ROWLAND. 

Rawland, Elder Stephen, who died 
many years ago, was an able and 
faithful minister of the Old School 
Baptist Church and his memory is 
cherished in the hearts, and his name 
often on tne lips of many now living 
in Arkansas. Elder Rowland moved 
from Mississippi to Arkansas, and 
spent most of his useful life in the 
latter state where his labors were 
blessed to the comfort and upbuilding 
of Zibn's City. 



MERIDY L. ROY. 

Roy, Elder Meridy L., was born 
September IS, 1805, in South Carolina. 
His father moved to Dickson County, 
Tenn., when he was about seven years 
of age ,and raised him there. He was 
married to Susan Gentry, January 10, 
1833. He embraced religion at the age 
of twenty years, but in a way that he 
was not satisfied. He went on in this 
way for some years. He attended an 
association, and said he prayed during 
the entire meeting for a brighter evi- 
dence, and about the close of the 
meeting he became satisfied. This oc- 
curred September 21, 1835. On his 
way home he said the impression was 
made in him to preach. He joined the 
church in 1837, and began to preach 
in the Spring of 1838, and continued 
until his death, which occurred May 1, 
1885 — a period of forty-seven years. 
During this long period of time he re- 
mained firm and steadfast in the faith 
and believed the Bible taught. He 
earnestly contended for election pre- 
destination and salvation by grace, 
and never preached or advocated any- 
thing that ever caused the least trou- 
ble or discord in the church. He did 
not only stand high in the esteem of 
his brethren, but in the language of 
Paul, had "a good report of them 
that are without." 



WILLIAM RUPARD. 

Rupard, Elder William (1825-1904), 
of Kentucky. He lived and died in a 
few miles of where he was born. His 



238 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



parents were strict members of the 
Old Baptist Church and were loved 
and respected by all who knew them. 
He received such education as the 
common schools afforded at that time, 
was given a hope in his sixteenth 
year and joined the Old Baptist 
Church at Goshen in 1842, and was 
baptized by Thos. Boone. The burden 
of the ministry was laid on him soon 
after he became a member of the 
church. After exercising his gift some 
in public service he was licensed and 
finally ordained in 1853. At the time 




WILLIAM RUPARD 

of his death he was pastor of Goshen, 
Lulbegrud, Liberty and Cane Spring 
churches. Some of them he served 
nearly fifty years. He was moderator 
of North District Association for 
forty-four years and was a true and 
faithful servant of God at home and 
abroad, suffering many trials and pri- 
vations. He was an orator, gifted as 
an expounder of the Scriptures, heart- 
searching as a minister, a feeder of 
the sheep and lambs of God. He was 
a firm believer in the doctrines of the 
Bible and taught God's children to ob- 
serve all things commanded in His 
Word. The high esteem in which he 
was held was attested by the large 
gathering of brethren and sisters and 



friends at his funeral. He died as he 
had lived, trusting alone in Jesus for 

salvation. • 

A. H. RUPARD. 

Rupard, Elder A, H., of Hedges, 
Ky., is the faithful pastor of Liberty 
Church and other churches of this 
section of Kentucky, and is also the 
moderator of the North District Asso- 
ciation of Old Baptists. The editor 
regrets that further information 
could not be secured. 



W. R. RUSHTON. 

Rushton, Elder W. R., of Buffalo, 
Tenn., is an able minister of the New 
Testament, a faithful pastor of 
churches, and the beloved moderator 
of the W^st Tennessee Association. 



W. P. RUSSELL. 

Russell, Eldsr W. P., of LaFayette, 
Tenn., was born in Macon County, 
August 23, 1868, raised by good, pious 
parents but who were unable to teach 
him to love good and hate evil. As a 
boy he was thoughtless and rude, 
seeking only the pleasures of the 
world. But one day when he was in 
his seventeenth year God's spirit con- 
victed him of sin and enabled him to 
view himself as a poor lost sinner; 
and after much sorrow of soul he was 
given a hope in Jesus and united with 
the Primitive Baptists and was bap- 
tized by Elder Miles F. West. The im- 
pression to tell others about the 
wonderful Saviour he had found soon 
began to disturb him for he felt un- 
qualified in many ways to preach the 
glorious gospel. Yet he could not rid 
himself of the impression, or hide his 
gift from the church, and was soon 
licensed, and in 1905, was ordained to 
the gospel ministry by Elders W. D. 
Agee, L. F. Evans and J. B. White. He 
has since had the care of churches 
and is now serving Cedar Creek, 
Friendship and Mt. View. Elder Rus- 
sell has had one or two public debates 
and wishes to contend for and preach 
the truth as it is in Jesus. 



W. W. SAIWMONS. 

Sammons, Elder W, W. (1827-1899). 
was born in Hardaman County, Tenn., 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church about 1855, and was ordained 



to the gospel ministry five years later 
and until the end of his life was a 
faithful under-shepherd. His life was 
a very exemplary one, his manner 
was always gentlemanly, his conver- 
sation chaste and refined, his dealing 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



239 



with men open and fair and he nest. 
He manifested a desire to suffer 
wrong rather than do wrong, and was 
so sympathetic in nature that he 
could hardly refuse any favor asked 
of him and was in hundreds of in- 
stances taken advantage of. During 
his life he paid over fifteen thousand 
dollars security money alone. At the 
close of the Civil war he had 1,500 
hushels of corn and refused to sell it 
for the high price of seven to ten dol- 
lars a barrel but would reply, "You 
can get it somewhere else if you have 
the money, — mine is for my poor 
neighbors and helpless widows who 
have no money." And to them he 
would sell on credit at a low price. 
This is but one instance of his love, 
consideration and sympathy for the 
pcor. Of course it is not expected that 
sucn a man would die rich, and this 
was the case with him, though he 
never suffered for needful things and 
was rich in faith. As a minister he 
was highly esteemed, was a good dis- 
ciplinarian and excellent peace-maker 
— the fruits of his labors still being 
realized both in Tennessee and Miss- 
issippi. Before his death he requested 
that ihe words "A sinner saved by 
grace" be inscribed on his tombstone. 
His life was useful — his death tri- 
umphant. 



ALLEN SAMMONS 

Sammons, Elder Allen of Hardiman 
County, Tenn., was a gifted preacher 
in his day. He died about fifty years 
ago but is remembered by people now 
living and who heard him as a min- 
ister. One sister of Stewart County, 
Tenn. writes the editor of his gift as 
a minister, but no detail statement of 
his labors can be obtained. Hence this 
brief sketch. 



CLARK SAMMONS. 

Sammons, Elder Clark, of Tennes- 
see, the grandson of the late Elder 
Allen Sammons, a noted preacher, 
was born April 17, 1861, convicted of 
sin in his twenty-first year of age 
while prostrated on the bed of afflic- 
tion and for two years carried in his 
heart the condemning sentence of 
God's holy law. But on the second day 
of July, 1882, he was given a sweet 
hope in Jesus, united with the church 
in 1889, and was baptized by Elder 
W. W. Sammon. He was soon impress- 
ed with the duty of preaching Jesus 



to others, the church recognized his 
gift and he was ordained August, 
1894, by Elders W. W. Sammon, J. A. 
Sammons and D. G. Cambers, and has 
since been serving churches. He is at 
present pastor of Mt. Tabor church in 
Hardiman County, Tenn., and has 




CLARK SAMMONS 

baptized a goodly number into the fel- 
lowship of the church. His traveling 
among the churches has been mostly 
confined to his native state. In 1889 
he was married to Miss Minnie Lee 
Neely. Seven children — six boys and 
one girl — have joined the family circle 
to bless the hearts of the parents. 




W. L. SAPPINGTON. 

Sappington, Elder W. L. (18G3-1908) 
of Guthrie, Mo., was born in Boone 
County, united with the New School 



240 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



or Missionary Baptists in early youth 
and lived with them for twenty years. 
But much of this time he felt that the 
Primitive Baptists were, more than 
any other denomination, contending 
for the doctrine and practices of the 
apostolic church, and in 1901 when 
attending the Salem Association he 
made a public confession of his error 
and asked for a home among the peo- 
ple who preached his experience and 
the doctrine of a finished salvation in 
Jesus. He was received, baptized, soon 
licensed to preach, and in 1905 was 
ordained by Elders H. C. Hogan, B. 
F. Querry and Ira Turner. He was 
soon called to the care of churches 
which he served faithfully until his 
death. Elder Sappington was a man of 
ability, energy and industry, a gifted 
preacher and useful citizen, and was 
greatly loved by Primitive Baptists, 
and highly esteemed as a neighbor 
and citizen for his manly qualities and 
sincerity of purpose. 




J. T. SATTERWHITE. 

Satterwhite, Elder J. T., of Opelika, 
Ala. This gifted and much beloved 
minister was born in Harris County, 
Ga., May 11, 1856. At an early age he 
became very serious about his sinful 
state — feeling condemned before God, 
and was brought to see that he was 
a guilty sinner in His holy sight. Af- 
ter a few years of perplexity of mind 
and heart and at a time when the 
most pressed, and the least expecting 
a divine favor, he received peace with 
God and a love for Him and His dear 
people that still abides with him. He 
had no religious training, though his 
father was a quiet and orderly mem- 



ber of the Primitive Baptist Church. 
He joined the Missionary Baptists and 
in a few months was sent as a messen- 
ger to their annual association, and 
here he saw that the works of men 
were more talked of and depended up- 
on than the works of God. Therefore 
he became much dissatisfied but re- 
mained with them several years and 
began his public exercises there. At 
the age of twenty he was married to 
Miss Laura Gamniill thinking that this 
would settle him in life and free him 
from the weight of the ministry of 
Christ which had been on his mind 
since his deliverance. For a short 
while he thought he had succeeded 
in his desires but soon with renewed 
force came this "woe is me if I preach 
not the gospel of Christ." About this 
time he with his afflicted wife and 
two small children moved to Chamb- 
ers County, Ala., near Mt. Pisgah 
Church where he lived a few years in 
rebellion against God's deep impres- 
sions to join the church and stand in 
His temple and speak all the words 
of this life. Finally he joined Mt. Pis- 
gah Church, was soon, by this church, 
licensed and in 1882 was ordained. 
Elder Satterwhite was soon called to 
the service of three churches, and 
some years later, when the late Elder 
W. M Mitchell became very feeble, 
was called as his assistant and at his 
death was chosen pastor. He is faith- 
ful to his people and greatly loved by 
them. They have never fully support- 
ed him in a temporal way though they 
have been continuously and liberally 
good to him. During his ministry he 
has labored hard on the farm tc< bet- 
ter enable him to meet the many ex- 
penses in public life, many of which, 
the members, generally, have no 
knowledge. 



ISAAC SAWIN. 



Sawin, Elder Isaac, of Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. This useful minister is a worthy 
representative of a remarkable Bap- 
tist family. His parents were both 
members of the Old School order, had 
a family of thirteen children, ten 
growing to the age of maturity and 
all joining the church of their parents 
and, three of the boys — J. G., P. W. 
and the subject of this sketch — are to- 
day able ministers of the new Testa- 
nient. Elder Sawin was born in Bar- 
tholomew County, Ind., December 15, 
1833, given a hope in the Saviotur, 
united with Lewis Creek Church and 
■was baptized by Elder Asa B. Nay 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



241 



January, 1854. He was soon licensed 
to preach and in 1871 was ordained by 
Elders Thos. Martin, Asa B. Nay, G. S. 
Weaver, Wlllett Tyler, P. K. Parr, P. 
W» Sawin and Harvey Wright, and 
has since had the care of churches. 
He has also traveled and preached in 
several states and recently moved to 
his present location and has care of 
the church in his city. Elder Sawin is 





ISAAC SAWIN 

in the seventy-sixth year of his age, 
and the fortieth year of his ministry — 
he commenced preaching in 18G9 — and 
is strong in the faith and able in the 
defense of the doctrine and practice 
of God our Saviour, and desires, in his 
preaching, to know nothing but Jesus 
and Him crucified and to finish his 
course with joy. 



JOHN G. SAWIN. 

Sawin, Elder John G, of Mattoon, 
111., was born near Edinburg, Ind., 



March 1, 1838. While but a youth he 
had many thoughts on the subject of 
his condition and the requirements 
necessary to fit him for heaven. That 
there was a preliminary work for all 
men to do in order to be saved he 
had nc doubt whatever. He attended 
and respected the Primitive Baptist 
Church to which his parents belonged, 
yet, he would never entertain the 
idea for a moment of identifying him- 
self with it. Such a thought was abso- 
lutely repulsive to him. The Old Bap- 
tists were old-fashioned and lacked 
progressiveness. Like most, if not all, 
other Arminians, he fully expected by 
his own works of righteousness, to, 
sometime, become a bright and lead- 
ing light in the religious world. But 
there came a time when such 
thoughts and evil imaginations were 
forever silenced. The hand of the 
Lord was laid upon him, The light 
shone out of darkness and his sinful 
heart was laid bare. His works, on 
which he had counted so much, be- 
came as filthy rags. The exceeding 
sinfulness of sin became more appar- 
ant as the days went by. The law 
thundered his just sentence — "The 
soul that sins it shall die," and "by 
the deeds of the law no flesh shall 
be justified." All was now plain and 
convincing. "If my soul were sent to 
hell, thy righteous law approves it 
well." Now he could only call upon 
God to be merciful. And in due time 
Go!d revealed himself as the sinner's 
friend — the chiefest among ten thou- 
sand, set his feet upon a rock and 
put a new song in his mouth even 
praise to His name, and it became to 
him a precious privilege to be re- 
ceived into the Primitive Baptist 
Church. In May,' 1859, he was baptized 
into the fellowship of the old Lewis 
Creek Church, Shelby County, Ind., by 
the late Elder J. G. Jackson. He was 
soon liberated to exercise publicly 
his gift and was in 1865 ordained to 
the full functions of the gospel min- 
istry and has since had the care of. 
churches. Elder Sawin mc ved from 
Indiana to Illinois in 1862, is now in 
his seventy-first year of age, yet is 
full of energy and zeal in the cause 
of truth. He is a useful minister and 
much loved by his people. 



P. W. SAWIN. 

Sawin, Elder P. W., of Shelbyville, 
Ky., was born in Johnson County, 
Ind., January 2, 1844, raised by Christ- 
ian parents who brought up their chil- 



242 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



dren in the nurture and admonition of 
the Lord and taught them the way to 
go. But this was the limit of their 
power. God alone could give their 
children eyes to see, ears to hear and 
hearts to! understand. This was done 
for Elder Sawin when he was about 
ten years of age. He was enabled to 
look within, to see and feel the cor- 
ruption of the natural heart and to 
cry unto the Lord for mercy. So great 
was his darkness and so deserving of 
hell seemed his case that he would 
have freely exchanged places with the 
beasts of the field. But God, who be- 
gins this good work continues it and 
he was made to trust in Jesus and re- 




P. W. SAWIN 



joice in his salvation. He united with 
the dear old church in his fifteenth 
year, began his public service in his 
eighteenth year, was soon licensed 
and in 1868 was ordained to the full 
work of? the ministry, and he soon 
went on a preaching tour through 
Ohio, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, 
North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland 
and Pennsylvania. Leaving home with 
less than two dollars, he was given 
faith to trust God and after traveling 
more than five thousand miles, return- 
ed home and like the apostles could 
say he lacked ncthing, that his needs 
were supplied and his life preserved 
and he made more humble and grate- 
ful for God's mercies. This was forty- 
eight years ago, and since then Elder 
Sawin has treveled more than one 
hundred thousand miles by rail, and 
many thousand by private conveyance 
in the United States and Canada,* in 
the service of the Master without a 
money consideration, but for the love 
of God and his people; and now in the 
sixty-fifth year of his age he can feel 



the Lord has sustained him and open- 
ed the hearts of His people to minis- 
ter to his necessities in many ways. 
He is now serving five churches and 
is strong in the faith, and bold in the 
defense of the doctrine of God our 
Saviour yet he feels to be a poor, un- 
profitable servant, loves the fellow- 
ship of. his brethren and desires to die 
at Ms post of duty. Elder Sawin has 
for many years served as moderator 
of the Licking Association of Primi- 
tive Baptists and is highly esteemed 
where known. 



JOEL P. SAYERS. 

Sayers, Elder Joel P., of Coosa 
County, Ala., was born in 1812, and 
died September, 1895, in his eighty- 
fourth year of age. For thirty years 
he was a faithful preacher, devoted 
to the cause of Christ and ready to 
make any reasonable sacrifice. In his 
preaching his theme was Jesus and 
His sure salvation for his people. He 
never sought to be popular with the 
world but desired to contend for the 
truth under all circumstances. He 
was a good disciplinarian and for 
many years was moderator of the 
Wetumpka Association. His last ser- 
mon was preached at Little Hope As- 
sociation, and on his way home he 
was taken sick and died in about two 
weeks in the full triumphs of faith. 




WILLIAM SEARS. 

Sears, Elder William, of Calloa, Mo., 
"was born in North Carolina, Apiil 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



243 



11, 1804, and joined Silver Creek 
Church, Randolph County, Mo., in 
1832, and was ordained in 1834. He 
was moderator of Yellow Creek Asso- 
ciation for many years and was a 
warm gospel preacher. He died Au- 
gust 8, 1878." Further information of 
his life and labors could not be ob- 
tained. 




S. W. SEARS 

Sears, Elder S. W., of Palmyra, Mo., 
"was born in Randolph County, Mo., 
April 7, 1843, and united with Silver 
Creek Church in October, 18G5. He 
was ordained in Chariton Church, Ma- 
con County, Mo., in which he now has 
membership, September IS, 1880, and 
has had the care of four churches al- 
most ever since. He is at present the 
moderator of Yellow Creek Associa- 
tion.' From Elder Cash's book.. 1896. 
Information for a full sketch for this 
work could not be obtained. 



SAMUEL SEITZ. 

Seitz, Elder Samuel, of Ohio, who 
peacefully passed away at his home 
near Van Buren, August 15, 1899, was 
a faithful servant, a good counsellor, 
and a kind-hearted Christian whose 
life Avas crowned with the grace of 
humility and meekness, which made 
his labors in the ministry of great 
value to those whom he served. The 
greater part of his life was spent in 



the service of his brethren and his 
Lord, and notwithstanding all the 
hardships through which he passed in 
traveling many miles through heat 
and cold in serving churches, and in 
clearing up a large farm, and sup 
porting his family, he lived to a good 
old age,, and until his last sickness 
was remarkably strong for a man of 
his age. Thus, after a life of constant 
toil, a life well spent, he has gone to 
his reward. The editor regrets that 
full particulars of Elder Seitzs labors 
in the ministry could not be obtained. 



NATHANIEL M. SENTER. 

Senter, Elder Nathaniel M. (1810- 
1877), was born in Virginia, united 
with the Baptists at Piney Creek 
Church in his seventeenth year and 
was the following year licensed, and 
in 1838 was ordained to the gospel 
ministry by Elders Druery Senter and 
Solomon Stamper. Uniting with the 
church before the division he opposed 
the innovations that were brought in 
and pressed upon the churches. His 
warning voice was heard and his in- 
fluence was felt during these days of 
dissension, and through it all he stood 
firm for the doctrine and practice of 
the apostolic church. He was for many 
years moderator of: the Mountain 
District Association, also served the 
Senter Association in the same ca- 
pacity. Elder Senter was a good dis- 
ciplinarian, an interesting speaker and 
a faithful soldier of King Emmanuel, 
and died in the faith of God's elect 
with a comforting assurance of happi- 
ness beyond. 



JOHN D. SCOT - 



Scott, Elder John D., of Wilson 
County, N. C, was born about the 
year 1833, and died July 31, 1893. He 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at White Oak in 1871 and was 
baptized by Elder Jesse Baker, and 
was in 1874 ordained to the gospel 
ministry, but the editor is unable to 
speak of his ministerial work in detail 
or to name the churches he served. 
He was, a few months before his 
death, bitten by a rabid dog, from 
which he was never entirely cured, 
and after much suffering passed away 
— his last words being, 'Jesus, Jesus." 
Elder Gold, who was well acquainted 
with him, writes, at the time of his 
death,, as follows: "Elder Scott had 



244 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



his faults, and P. D. Gold lias his 
faults too. Elder Scctt possessed to 
me some lovely, noble traits, and his 
death was very sad to me. I was pres- 
ent and spoke with Elder J. S. Wood- 
ard at his burial." 




JOHN L. SCOTT. 

Scott, Elder John L., of Pleasant 
Plains,. 111., "was born in Sangamon 
County, 111., January 1, 18G5, and 
united with Union Church, Morgan 
County, 111., in 1884. He was ordained 
in the year 1893, and has had the care 
of churches ever since. He is moder- 
ator of Morgan Association in the 
state of Illinois." This brief sketch is 
from Elder Cash's book of 189G. The 
editor failed to obtain further infor- 
mation of Elder Scott's life and la- 
bors. 



ABNER SHANK. 

Shank, Elder Abner, of Turner, Ore., 
was born in Montgomery County, O , 
December 27, 1810, united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church called Paint 
Creek, in Carroll County, Ind., in Au- 
gust, 1840, was ordained in Sharon 
Church, Guthrie County, Iowa, in Oc- 
tober, 1S64, and moved to the state of 
Oregon in the year 1865. Elder Shank 
was a true, faithful under-shepherd, 
standing high in the affection and es- 
teem of the Baptists of Oregon among 
whom he earnestly labored in the 



cause of truth. The editor failed to se- 
cure proper data for a detailed notice 
of this useful minister's labors. 




LEVI B. SHERWOOD. 

Sherwood, Elder Levi B., of Ohio, 
was born in the state of Virginia Sep- 
tember 16, 1827. He moved with his 
parents to Ohio in early life, locating 
in Delaware County; professed a hope 
in Christ at the age of twelve years, 
united with the Marlborough Prim- 
itive Baptist Church, November, 1839, 
and was baptized by Elder Benjamin 
Martin. He was united in marriage to 
Julia Ann Wornstaff, August 23, 1849. 
To this union five children were born. 
In June 1858, the church liberated him 
to exercise the gift that God had 
given, and in 1859 he was ordained to 
the work of a gospel minister by the 
following presbytery: Elders Jcfhn 
Lewis, Zachariah Thomas, Eli Ash- 
brook, Daniel Schofield, Samuel Mer- 
ideth and S. C. Main. During his min- 
istry he baptized two hundred and 
sixteen persons, married two hundred 
and fifty-six couples, attended hun- 
dreds of funerals, served four 
churches almost continually and left a 
record of faithful, zealous service in 
the Master's, vineyard. He died Au- 
gust 22, 1890, in the triumph of that 
living faith he had so faithfully 
preached to others. 



JOHN SHIELDS. 

Shields, Elder John (1814-1873), of 
Indiana, was born in Jennings County. 
He was a man of deep thought, strong 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



245 



intellect and good memory. For a 
number of years he was almost blind, 
and not being able to read on this ac- 
count, he had to depend upon his 
memory, and it was remarkable how 
he could call to mind, and locate, most 
any passage of Scripture in the Bible 
which he needed to connect a chain 
of thought. He began his ministerial 
duties at Sugar Creek Church in Ed- 
gar County, 111., in 1843, and for thirty 
years was a faithful pastor. He was 
a noted pulpit orator, stood well 
amc'ng the Baptists and was favored 
to baptize hundreds in the fellowship 
of his churches during his ministry. 
He traveled extensively during his 
life. At the time of his death he was 
a member of Providence Church 
which was organized in 1844, and 
which he served as pastor for many 
years. 




D. B. SHIFFIELD. 

Shiffield, Elder D. B., of Fort 
Pierce, Fla., was born March 8, 1840, 
convicted of sin and given a hope in 
the Saviour of sinners in youth and 
united with the Primitive Baptists 
November, 18G6, and was baptized by 
Elder J. E. W. Smith. He was soon 
impressed with the duty of preaching 
Jesus to others, but as he had no ad- 
vantages of an education when young, 
and was unable to read, he felt that 
to preach was an impossibility. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Miss 
Debbie Miller, — to whcm he was mar- 
ried in 1866, soon after his return j 
from the war, was fairly well educat- 
ed, and became her husband's teacher, j 
and her pupil was an apt one and 
was soon reading the Bible with ease. J 



But Jonah-like, he for many years ran 
from duty and suffered many trials. 
His mind was so deeply impressed 
that there was a work for him to do 
in South Florida, that he moved there 
in 1870, was soon ordained, and since 
has had the care of several churches. 
Elder Shiffield is an experimental 
preacher, sound in the doctrine of sal- 
vation by grace and faithful in the 
cause of Christ. 



J. H. SHIRLEY. 

Shirley, Elder J. H., of Ohio, was 
born in Laurens District, S. C, April 
20, 1828,— moved to Alabama 1832; 
settled in the Indian Nation, Cham- 
bers County, where he suffered all the 
hardships incident to a new country; 
was married in 1849 to Miss Martha 
Copeland. One child was born to this 
union, and it and its mother died in 
1851. He received a hope in Jesus in 
1844 and in July, 1852, joined the 
church of Christ at Emaus in Chamb- 
ers County, Ala., was baptized by Elder 
J. M. Duke, and was married the sec- 
ond time to Miss Mary A. L. Sanders 
in 1852. To this union were born four 
children, three of whom are still liv- 
ing. He went through the war between 
the states; was wounded in his right 
arm, making him a cripple for life; 
began preaching in 1871; was ordain- 
ed about 1872, and for many years 
served four churches regularly. He 
moved to Shelby County, Ala., about 
1890 and has since lived there. He is 
able in the defense of the doctrine, 
and an earnest worker in his Masters' 
vineyard; and, the best part of it was, 
he has walked as he talked. He is now 
past his eightieth mile-post, and it 
will not be long till his gray head, 
wrinkled face, and his stooped body 
will be changed for the grand beau- 
ties cf youth with a goMen crown in 
that beautiful world above. 



A. S. SHOEMAKER. 

Shoemaker, Elder A. S., of Ohio, 
was born, March 9. 1S32, in Delaware 
County, O., in what was then an al- 
most unbroken wilderness, near where 
he now lives. His father and mother 
were Primitive Baptists, and were in 
the constitution of Alum Creek 
Church, June, 1835, now located in the 
village of Ashley, O. His father died 
when he was ten years of age, leaving 
a mother with four children, of whom 



246 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



he was the eldest. Hence he knew 
something of the privatichs of a fath- 
erless boy in a new country. In early 
life he became concerned about him- 
self as a poor sinner. In December, 
1852, when in his twenty-first year, af- 
ter many hours of sorrrtw, he was 
made to rejoice in a precious hope. 
July 21, 1853, he was married. In De- 
cember, 1853, he went to the church 
of which he is now a member and was 
baptized. His wife became a member 
a few years later. He soon began to 
be exercised in mind about preaching, 
but tried to keep it hid. The church 




A. S. SHOEMAKER 

feeling that the Lord had blessed 
him witn a eift, he was liberated, 
October 8, 18G4, and after having 
twice refused to submit to the will 
of the church, was ordained, May 9, 
1868. He has served churches contin- 
uously to the present time and is now 
serving fcur churches. His wife, who 
was the mother of four children, de- 
voted to her family and to the church, 
died November 25, 1894, in the tri- 
umph of faith. April 3, 1898, he was 
again married, and was again blessed 
with a loving and agreeable compan- 
ion, with whom he was permitted to 
live ctaly nine years and seven 
months, when he was again bereft of 
such endearing companionship. Elder 
Shoemaker is an humble, faithful and 
useful minister and highly esteemed 
by those among whom he labors. 



united with the New School Baptists 
in June, 1870, but becoming dissatis- 
fied with them and feeling they were 
not contending for the faith once de- 
livered unto the saints he united with 



W. M. SHOEMAKER. 

Shoemaker, Elder W. M., of Ashley, 
O. This able and faithful "soldier of 
the cross' was born near Ashley, Del- 
aware County, O., November 27, 185G; 




W. M. SHOEMAKER 

the Old School Baptists at Alum 
Creek Church, October 2, 187G, and 
was baptized by Elder L. B. Sher- 
wood. He commenced preaching in 
1888 and was ordained December, 
1891, and now has the care of three 
churches. Elder Shoemaker was, in 
August, 187G, married to Miss Lucy 
Sherwood. He is zealous in the cause 
of truth and highly esteemed among 
his people. 

BENJAMIN SHORT. 



Short, Elder Benjamin, of West Vir- 
ginia, son of William and Sarah Short, 
was born in Wyoming County, W. Va., 
December 30, 185G, and died March 
4, 1893. Early in life it pleased the 
Lord to show him his sinful condition 
by nature and what he must be by 
grace to see God in peace. Soon he 
was given a hope in the Saviour; 
united with the Primitive Baptists, 
and in a few years was ordained to 
the work of the ministry. He proved 
faithful until the end and finished 
his course in the triumphs of a living 
faith. 



ASA D. SHORT. 

Short, Elder Asa D., of Floyd, Va., 
son of Joseph N. and Mary Short, was 
born in Floyd County, Va., April 17, 
1842. His opportunities for an educa- 
tion were very limited — his school 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



247 



days altogether amounting to about 
six months. When about twelve years 
of age he was deeply concerned about 
salvation, and though this interest re- 
mained with him through all the years 
c/f youth and early manhood and fol- 
lowed him even amid the carnage of 
battle — for he was a soldier in the 
late war and realized the providential 
care of God especially at the battle of 
Missionary Ridge — yet he had no well 
grcunded hope in the Saviour or a 
fleeling sense of the forgiveness of his 
sins until his twenty-sixth year. This 
hope in the Saviour was preceded by 
about two years of gloom, despond- 
ency and a feeling that he had "sinned 
away his day of grace" and that there 
was no hope for him. When he was 
delivered of this burden of condemna- 
tion he was impressed with the duty 
of baptism and that he must preach 
Jesus to others. He united with the 
Primitive Baptists April, 1868, was 
baptized by Elder T. L. Roberson, 
began preaching one month after- 
wards and was ordained September, 
1873, by Elders Daniel Conners, G. L. 
Tuggle and W. H. Dodd. Elder Short 
now has the care of four churches, 
is faithful and zealous and feels ac- 
countable to the Lord for his stew- 
ardship. In 1866 he was married to 
Miss Sarah C. Graham, which union 
was blessed with ten children, six of 
whom are now living. 




A. A. SHOULTZ. 

Shoultz, Elder A. A., of Owensville, 
Ind., was born in Pike County, Febru- 
ary 25, 1862, moved to Missouri with 
his mother when a boy, had poor ad- 
vantages of an education but was an 



apt schclar and close observer, at- 
tended Sunday School in youth but 
enjoyed riding his mother's mule to 
the Missionary Church much better 
than he did reading the lessons. How- 
ever their teaching seemed to be 
about right — that we could not be sav- 
ed withe ut being good, and we could 
not be good without doing good, and 
it depended altogether on what we did 
in regard to being saved. But his 
mother, who was a Primitive Baptist, 
would tell him that salvation all de- 
pended on what the Lord did for 
sinners, and that they were saved 
through the mercy and grace of God. 
But he was not interested in either 
way of salvation very much until 
eighteen years old, when he learned 
by experience that it would net do to 
depend on human merit, and the plan 
of salvation that his mother advocated 
was the only plan that would save a 
condemned sinner like himself. At the 
age of twenty he moved back to In- 
diana and lived with his uncle who 
was a Primitive Baptist; when he 
went with him to his meeting the 
preacher advocated the same plan of 
salvation that his mother taught. And 
in spite of all the hard things he had 
heard said against the Primitive Bap- 
tists he loved them and their doctrine, 
offered himself to Little Zion Church 
in Pike County, Ind., 1882, and was 
received and baptized by their pastor, 
Elder J. \V. Richardson. He was soon 
impressed to preach the gospel but 
tried to keep it to himself. In this he 
failed, — the church knew his secret, 
liberated him, and in 1888 he was or- 
dained and has since had the care of 
churches, and is now preaching for 
some of the churches that the late 
Lemuel Potter served. Elder Shoultz 
is an able, energetic and faithful min- 
ister and has for many years served 
as moderator of the Salem Associa- 
tion. He is satisfied with the old fash- 
ion church and wants no doctrine and 
practice in his churches not taught in 
the New Testament. 



NOAH SHOWALTER. 

Showalter, Elder Noah, of Illinois, 
was born in Virginia, September 25, 
1826, and died February 19, 1906, in 
his seventy-ninth year of age. He unit- 
ed with the Primitive Baptists about 
the year 1854, was ordained deaccto 
four years later and in 1862 was set 
apart for the work of the gospel min- 
istry. All this was done by the Little 
Rock Church, Cass County, 111., and 



248 



PRTMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



soon afterwards Elder Showalter 
moved to Iowa and later to Kansas. 
Later he settled in Moscow, Idaho, 
and had the care of churches most 
of his ministerial life and was loved 
by those among whom he labored. 



L. C SHREWSBURY. 

Shrewsbury, Elder L. C, of Beckley, 
W. Va., is the faithful pastor of 
churches within the bounds of Indian 
Creek Baptist Association, and has for 
some time served as moderator of this 
body and it is with regret that an 
extended notice of his life and labors 
could not appear. 



ASA SIDBURRY. 

Sidburry, Elder Asa (1804-1882), of 
North Carolina. This faithful minister 
who peacefully passed over "the river" 
in the seventy-eighth year of his age 
was indeed a father in Israel. His ten- 
derness, fatherly care and wholesome 
advice will long be remembered by 
his churches. He was in the constitu- 
tion of the White Oak Baptist Asso- 
ciation, also* in the constitution of the 
Yopps Church, which took place 
1835, He was ordained deacon Decem- 
ber, 1843, and he filled that office un- 
til the Lord was pleased to call him 
to a more noble work. He was then 
ordained to the ministry in Septem- 
ber, 1847, by Elders Jcsiah Smith and 
Samuel Holt. He was then chosen 
pastor of the Yopps Church and after 
wards had the care of other churches 
in the bounds of the "White Oak Asso- 
ciation which he faithfully served un- 
til his warfare was ended. In life he 
was useful and highly esteemed — in 
the hour of death, calm, resigned and 
hcpefully triumphant;, and when his 
friends would come to see him and 
try to cheer him by telling him 
they hoped he would soon get better 
he would tell them not to hope that 
for he did not want to get better in 
this world, but longed to see the mo- 
ment come that would release him 
from this world, and he would beg 
his weeping wife and friends not to 
grieve after him for he would be bet- 
ter off, and the last words he was ever 
heard to say were, "farewell vain 
world, I bid you adieu.' 



MATTHEW SIKES. 

Sikes, Elder Matthew (1825-1900), 
of Geofrgia, was a most devoted and 



able minister. He preached for a num- 
ber of years in a section where there 
were but few Primitive Baptist 
Churches — using school houses and 
churches of other orders, private 
houses and often in the woods at 
neighborhood gatherings. Under his 
ministry, several churches were es- 
tablished. He bore many burdens 
alone and did not receive the financial 
help from the brotherhood that was 
due him. Nevertheless he himself was 
faithful. In the pulpit he was eloquent 
and convincing, and in private life 
humble and childlike. His character 
was clean and strong. He stood at his 
post of duty for thirty years and few 
persons ever showed greater self-de- 
nial, and more fervent zeal in the 
cause of truth. 




E. B. SIMMONS. 

Simmons, Elder E. B., of Hunting- 
ton, Tenn., was born in Carroll Coun- 
ty, Tenn.; obtained a hope in Jesus 
when about sixteen years eld; united 
with the Primitive Baptist Church in 
his twentieth year and was ordained 
to the ministry November 23, 1890. 
He has served several churches as 
pastor and has traveled and preached 
in several states. Elder Simmons is 
moderator of the Big Sandy Associa- 
tion of Tennessee and is greatly be- 
loved by his people. As a business 
man and teacher he has also been 
prominent. He taught school for twen- 
ty-two years, merchandised for two 
years, was one of the promoters of the 
Dixie Telephone Company in Ten- 
nessee and Kentucky and served as 
its president; is also connected as di- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



249 



rector and representative of other bus- 
iness enterprises of his town and 
state, and has the confidence of his 
neighbors and business associates. 



W. A. SIMPKINS. 

Simpkins, Elder W. A., of Raleigh, 
N. C., is a young minister of recogniz- 
ed gifts and many admirable traits of 
character. He has the pastoral care of 
Mt. Gilead, the church at Raleigh and 
other churches, and his labors in the 
Master's kingdom have been blessed to 
the cc'mfort, edification and instruc- 
tion of many of God's children. Elder 
Simpkins is also a valued correspond- 
ent of Zion's Landmark, a lover of 
peace and satisfied with the order of 
God's house. 




ALLEN SISK. 

Sisk, Elder Allen, of Excelsior 
Springs, Mo., was born in Cocke Coun- 
ty, Tenn., December 9, 1833, and unit- 
ed with the Primitive Baptist Church, 
called New Garden, Ray County, Mo., 
in August, 1859, where he was or- 
dained in August, 186G. In his youth 
he was wild and reckless, but since 
called to follow the Lord Jesus he 
has been a faithful soldier of the cross 
and serves the churches acceptably. 
E'der Sisk has for a number of years 
been moderator of the Fishing River 
Association and is greatly loved by 
the churches. He is a safe, sound and 
worthy minister. 




JOHN W. SKAGGS. 

Skaggs, Elder John W., of Kansas 
City, Mo., was born in Cass County, 
111., February 21, 1839, and grew to 
manhood in that state, experienced 
a hope in Christ in 1861, was married 
to Miss Lucy C. Hawthorn in 1867, 
moved to Kansas in the fall of 1867, 
and united with the Primitive Baptists 
November, 1869, and was baptized by 
Elder A. H. Mahuron. He began speak- 
ing in public in 1872, moved to Fort 
Scctt in November, 1874, where his 
wife died April 13, 1875. In July of 
the same year he returned to Illinois, 
united with Little Flock Church by 
letter and was ordained to the full 
work of the ministry in 1S76. While 
there he was married to Miss Anna 
M. Ellis, September, 1880. Elder 
Skaggs has served several churcnes 
as pastor and assistant pastor and 
has traveled considerably in the mid- 
dle west and some of the western 
states. 



MITCHEL SLOAN. 

Sloan, Elder Mitchel, of Tenn., was 
born May 10, 1824, and died March 26, 
1907, having passed the eighty-fourth 
mile post. He united with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church about the year of 
1845, and was baptized by Elder Wm. 
Tacket, in fellowship with the Old 
Chloe Church, and began his ministry 
soon afterwards. He contended earn- 
estly for the faith once delivered to 
the saints, and was not. carried about 
by every wind of doctrine. He was 
pastor of Raccoon, Philadelphia, and 
Greasy Creek Churches for a number 
of years . He was noted for his good 



250 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



memory, and in his extreme old age 
was able to read fine print without 
glasses. He died strong in the faith 
of salvation in Jesus. 




ISAAC SKELTON. 

Skelton, Elder Isaac, of Loveland, 
Iowa, was born in Putnam County, 
Ind., December 24, 1840, and united 
with the Old School Baptist Church 
called Council Bluffs in Pottawatta- 
mie County, Iowa, in 1864. He was or- 
dained as deacon of the church in 
1873, and was ordained as minister of 
the gospel in 1877.. in which office he 
was faithful. He died December 25, 
1892. 



ABNER SMITH. 

Smith, Eider Abner, of Texas. This 
faithful minister moved from Alabama 
about the year 1832 and settled in 
Bartrc<p County. He was one of the 
pioneer preachers of Texas, and with 
others, constituted Providence Church 
about the year 1S33. He was strong in 
the faith of God's salvation in Jesus 
for all the seed of promise and stood 
firm for Bible doctrine and practice in 
the great division 1827-1835, and the 
editor regrets that a more complete 
sketch could not be given. 



JOB SMITH. 

Smith, Elder Job (1821-1906), was 
born in Onslow County, N. C., united 
with the Primitive Baptists at White 



Oak Church 1845, began preaching 
soon afterward and was ordained in 
1870 by Elders John Hewett and Bry- 
an Whitford. He was soon called to 
the care of White Oak, Wardsville 
and North East Churches and served 




JOB SMITH 

them faithfully as long as he was able 
to travel. He was an old fashion 
preacher and a lover of peace and 
fellowship. Brother Smith served as 
First Lieutenant in the North Carolina 
militia during the Mexican war, and 
was in all the relations of life a plain, 
straightforward, honest man. 



E. C. SMITH. 

Smith, Elder E. C. (1869-1899), ot 
North Carolina, was convicted of sin 
in early life and united with the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church. He was, some 
years afterwards ordained to the min- 
istry and served churches in the east- 
ern part of the state, but a suitable re- 
cord of his labors cannot, for lack of 
data, be given. 



HENRY SPEAR. 

Spear, Elder Henry, of Pennsylva- 
nia, who died in 1840, was truly a fath- 
er in Israel, and a beloved brother in 
Christ. He had long stood on 
the spiritual walls of the Zion of God, 
in this militant state. For nearly half 
a century he was an indefatigable 
minister of the New Testament. When 
he commenced his ministry the coun- 
try was new and there were very few 
Baptists on the western side of the 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



251 



Allegheny mountains — nut few roads, 
and they were over mountains and ex- 
tensive wilds, abounding with beasts 
of prey. All these hardships trials, 
dangers and perils he encountered and 
endured with the unyielding courage 
of a true disciple of Jesus Christ. He 
sought out the residence of the poor 
cottager of the wood; preached to 
him Jesus Christ the only way, the 
truth, the life and salvation, and as- 
sisted in gathering many churches in 
various parts of this country (most of 
which became members of Redstone 
Association) ; and labored constantly 
with his hands to supply his numer- 
ous family and friends; he fed the 
hungry, clothed the naked, gave couch 
to the wearry traveler; did much in 
different ways by labor, counsel and 
cash, to sustain and to entertain the 
churches and brethren both at home 
and abroad. 



R. T. SPEIGHT. 

Speight, Elder R. T. (1811-1900), 
Breeman, Ga., was born in Darlington 
District, S. C, raised by Methodist pa- 
rents, and spent his youth in folly, 
and as he wrote, neither hoping for 
heaven ncr caring for hell. But God 
who is rich in mercy cared for him 
when he did not care for himself, 
brought him to see and repent of his 
sins, gave him a sweet hope in Jesus 
and enabled him to take up the cross 
November, 1834, and was baptized by 
Elder Mitchell Bennett into the fellow- 
ship of Bay Creek Church, Walton 
Cciunty, Ga. He had impressions to 
preach before he was baptized, but dis- 
obeyed the heavenly call, was greatly 
afflicted and brought very low in sor- 
row's vale. In 1843 he agreed to sub- 
mit to the Lord and His church, was 
ordained by Elders Henry Haynes, 
Moses H. Denman and Allen Pensan. 
Elder Speight was a useful minister, 
was in the constitution of several 
churches, assisted in many ordination 
exercises of elders and deacons, bap- 
tized and married many persons, and 
faithfully served four churches almost 
continuously until his death. 



regretted that a more extended sketch 
of Elder Spinks' life and labors could 
not appear. 



J. D. SPINKS. 

Spinks, Elder J. D., of Lawhon, La., 
is moderator of the Louisiana Primi- 
tive Baptist Association and the faith- 
ful pastor of Mt. Olive and other 
churches of this association and it is 



JOHN STADLER. 

Stadler, Elder John, of Caswell 
County, N. C, died March 8, 1860. He 
was an eminent servant of the Most 
High God and noted for his faithful 
stewardship. For twenty-one consec- 
utive years he was appointed by his 
association — the Country Line — as a 
messenger to the Kehukee Association 
and never failed but once to attend 
in that pericd of time. He was a man 
of sound judgment, wide influence 
and good deportment, and as a minis- 
ter, was able, firm and faithful. 



C. W. STALLINGS. 

Stallings, Elder C. W., of Georgia, 
was born April 15, 1861, and died No- 
vember 14, 1905; at eighteen years of 
age he was married to Miss Dora 
Howell, and they lived agreeably to- 
gether until his death. They raised six 
children — the youngest nine years eld 
at the death of the father. Three 
daughters united with the church of 
his membership. One died in infancy. 
There were four girls and three boys 
in all. He united with the Methodist 
church in his eighteenth year, and 
lived a strict member -with them for 
six years. He joined the Old School 
or Primitive Baptists at Cat Creek 
Church, in Lowndes County, Ga., in 
1886, and was baptized by his father, 
Elder T. W. Stallings, and in 1889 he 
was licensed. In 1891 he was ordained 
to the full functions of the gospel 
ministry by Elders A. V. Simms, W. H. 
Tomberlin, J. A. O'Steen, and T. W. 
Stallings. And since that time he 
spent much of his time in faithfully 
serving the churches under his care. 
He was sorely afflicted for fourteen 
years; and during the last seven years 
of his life he was carried in an invalid 
chair, and sat down while preaching. 
Yet, he continued faithful to the end. 
Three of the churches he served for 
eight years, and enly missed four con- 
ferences during all that time. He was 
equally as faithful to his family. For 
two years of the latter part of his life 
he was unable to feed himself, but 
yet he served the Baptists and his 
family faithfully manifesting the very 
same love for them and for the cause 
of Christ that he ever did. He baptized 
about 200 members before he became 



252 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



unable to administer that ordinance; 
and married many people. He assisted 
in the constitution of six or eight 
churches, assisted in the ordination of 
five or six preachers and twelve dea- 
cons, ever seeming willing to make 
any sacrifice for the cause of Christ 
that was needful on his part, and to 
prove the life of an honest man. He 
at one time turned over all he pos- 
sessed of worldly goods to his debtors, 
and trusted the Lord for his living, 
proving that he was seeking God and 
His kingdom, believing that all need- 
ful things wculd be added to him, 
which was proven in his case. He 
surely fought the good fight of faith 
and died as he had lived — trusting 
alone in the merits of a crucified and 
arisen Saviour. 



JOHN A. STAMPER. 

Stamper, Elder John A., of North 
Carolina. Among the faithful ministry 
of the old, time-honored Kehukee As- 
sociation of a half century ago, stood 
Elder John A. Stamper. Upright in 
life, modest in appearance, chaste in 
conversation, sound and well-grounded 
in the doctrine of God our Saviour, he 
was a useful man in his day and gen- 
eration and an able minister of the 
New Testament. He united with the 
Primitive Baptists at Kehukee Church 
about 1S4S, licensed to preach May, 
1854, ordained April, 1855; was twice 
married — first to Miss Eliza Whitaker 
in 1823, and after her death, to Miss 
Martha Whitehead in 1831. By the 
first union two children were born, 
and eight by the second. In the 
triumphs of faith he fell asleep in 
Jesus July 9, 1876, at a ripe old age, 
and after an honorable and useful pil- 
grimage. ■ 

L. STARLING. 



Starling, Elder L., of Luraville, Fla.. 
is the moderator of San Pedro Prim- 
itive Baptist Association of Florida, 
and the faithful pastor cf churches 
within the bounds of this association, 
and the editor regrets that informa- 
tion for a more extended sketch could 
not be obtained. 



JOSEPH L. STATON. 

Stalon, Elder Joseph L. (1836-1891), 

cf Delaware. This gifted, faithful and 
much beloved minister was impressed 
with the gospel ministry before he 
united with the church. He made a 



public profession of Jesus when about 
thirty-eight years of age, was soon 
licensed and in 1879 was ordained. 
He was soon called to the care of 
churches and unselfishly labored for 
their peace and prosperity until his 
death in his fifty-fifth year of age. As 
a proof of his pastoral qualifications 
there were in his churches spiritual 
fruits and a steady growth of member- 
ship, while no jar ever occurred nor 
the sound of discord or dissatisfaction 
was ever heard. It is with regret that 
a more detailed record of Elder Sta- 
ton's life and labors cannot be given. 



W. F. STATON. 

Staton, Elder W. F., of Scotland, 
Neck, N. C, has for many years been 
a faithful minister of churches within 
the bounds of the old Kehukee Asso- 
ciation, and is highly esteemed for 
the truth's sake. Kind, tender and 
affectionate, he is a comfort to Zion 
and a lover of peace among her chil- 
dren. The editor regrets that for lack 
of sufficient information a more ex- 
tended notice could not appear of 
this useful minister. 



JUBAL STEARNS. 

Stearns, Elder Jubal. This eminent 
servant of God was born in Boston, 
Mass., in the year 1706. Early in life 
he was a Pedo-Baptist but upon exam- 
ination of the word cf God he became 
convinced that to follow Jesus he 
must be immersed. He was also made 
to see the error of infant baptism, 
renounced such practices and was 
baptized by Elder Wait Palmer, at 
Talland, Conn., 1751, and was ordain- 
ed to the ministry the same year. He 
traveled extensively and was one of 
the pioneer preachers of Virginia and 
North Carolina, and finally settled at 
Guilford Court House, N. G, where he 
was greatly blessed of the Lord. A 
church of sixteen members was or- 
ganized, known as Sandy Creek, 
which soon increased in number to 
about six hundred. The influence cf 
this church was great and many 
churches were soon built up from this 
small beginning. Elder Stearns was a 
man of small stature, with but little 
learning, but was a gifted speaker. 
His voice was musical, his eye pene- 
trating and many wonderful conver- 
sions are reported under his preach- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



253 



ing. He died in the realization of a 
Saviour's love November 20, 1771, and 
was buried near Sandy Creek meeting 
house. 




JOHN S. STEERS. 

Steers, Elder John S., of Dry Ridge, 
Ky., was born October 30, 1868, in 
Grant County, Ky., of Wm. H. and 
Elizabeth (Conrad) Steers, and labor- 
ed on the farm until he was twenty 
years of age, attending school some 
in the winter months. His father gave 
him his freedom at twenty and he at- 
tended college until he could get a 
first-class certificate to teach school. 
He taught school two years, then 
went to school at Lebanon, O., from 
which school he graduated. Since that 
time he has farmed two j-ears, worked 
at the carpenter's trade one year, run 
a general store three years and for 
the past five years has been cashier 
of the Farmers Bank of Equity of his 
town. He united with the Primitive 
or Old School Baptist Church in 1886, 
began preaching in 1890, was ordained 
to the work of the ministry August 
29, 1896, has traveled and preached in 
nearly half of the states of the Unicn, 
and has baptiztd and married a great 
many people. E'der Steers is one of 
the busiest of men. He is at present 
cashier of the Farmers Bank of Equi- 
ty, member of legislature — re-elected 
without opposition ; president of news- 
paper corporation, and connected with 
other enterprises of his town. His 
wife — who was Miss Lena A. Bracht — 
to whom he was married in 1903, is 
of great assistance to her husband. 
She is quite an expert banker, and in 
office work, can do almost anything 
her husband can, is interested in her 



husband's ministerial labors and 
urges him to attend his appointments 
and to also preach among the 
churches as much as possible. They 
bear the gospel yoke together go far 
as she can enter into her husband's 
labors, and to them both it is a labcs* 
of love. 



PATEN STEPHENS. 

Stephens, Elder Paten, of Columbia, 
Mo., was born in Rockingham County, 
N. C, in the year of 1777, and united 
with Liberty Church, in Kentucky. He 
moved to Callaway County, Mci, about 
the year 1820, and constituted Cedar 
Creek Church, in whose bounds he re- 
mained until his death, which occur- 
red April 2, 1865. He withstood the 
new Mission system firmly and held 
the esteem of his brethren to the 
end. For a number of years he was 
moderator of the Salem Association. 
Elder Stephens was a profound reas- 
oner, a good orator and held the re- 
spect of all good men who knew him. 




J. K. STEPHENS. 



Stephens, Elder J. K., of Ball Knob, 
Ark., the third son of Jeremiah and 
Emaline Stephens and brother of Dr. 
Jas. B. and Dr. (Eld.) J. Bunyan 
Stephens was born in Marshall Coun- 
ty, January 5, 1838. He was a soldier 
in the Confederate army and a mem- 
ber of Gen. N. B. Forest's escort; pro- 
fessed a hope in the Saviour in Sep- 
tember, 1866, and united with the 
Primitive Baptists at Big Flat Creek 
Church in Williamson Ccunty, Tenn., 
Saturday, the last day of 1866, and 



254 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



was baptized Sunday the first day of 
1867, by his father, Elder Jeremiah 
Stephens. Having- finished his course 
in the medical college at Nashville, he 
located in 1867, at Dukesdom, Tenn., 
and began the practice of medicine 
which he had to give up in 1889 on 
account of blindness. Here he was 
married December 6, 1868, to Miss 
Bettie Lovelace, and was, in 1874, or- 
dained to the work of the gospel min- 
istry by Elders W. A. Bowden, N. W. 
Little, R. Ross, N. G. Phillips and W. 
P. O'Kelly. Elder Stephens has faith- 
fully served several churches during 
his ministry, and has traveled and 
preached in seventeen different states, 
but in recent years has refused to ac- 
cept the care of churches. At present 
he is an invalid, and has been for sev- 
eral years, but notwithstanding the 
many sorrows and trials he has passed 
through — as the loss of five of his six 
children, the loss of eyesight and the 
giving away of health, he still feels 
the Lord has been good to him, and, 
like Jacob of old, is patiently waiting 
for God's salvation. His only living 
child — Mrs. Ella S. Moore, her hus- 
band and their oldest son Stephen — 
are all members of their honored fath- 
er's church; and with this faithful 
and pleasant family our aged brother 
and his loyal companion are spending 
the evening of their life. Dr. Steph- I 
ens was a successful practitioner 
when following his profession, has 
been an earnest, able and faithful min- 
ister of the New Testament, favorably | 
received where he has traveled and j 
preached among Baptists and is high- 
ly esteemed at home. 



EDMUND STEPHENS. 

Stephens, Elder Edmund, of Erlang- 
er, Ky. The following brief notice of 
Elder Stephens is from Elder Potter's 
book published 1895, and is here re- 
produced for want of data from, which 
to write a more extended sketch. "He 
was born in Kentucky, on the 29 th 
day of June, 1810, and joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church and was 
baptized on the second Sunday in Feb- 
ruary, 1842. He was ordained to the 
work of the ministry in 1854. Will be 
85 years old June 29, 1895, and is now 
the pastor of one church, and visits 
several others when the weather is 
pleasant." 

J. BUNYAN STEPHENS. 

Stephens, Eider J. Bunyan, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., was born February 5, 



1836, united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church in 1854, was ordained to 
the ministry August 14, 1859, and has 
been the paster of South College 
Street Church in Nashville, Tenn., for 
over forty-three years. He has during 
that time, resigned three times only 
to be refused by the church and again 
called to its care. And the last time 




J. BUNYAN STEPHENS 

he resigned he was called by the 
church for the remainder of his nat- 
ural life. Ever since he was ordained, 
and for a short time before, he has, 
in connection with his ministerial 
work, practiced medicine; and for the 
past twenty-five years has lectured in 
the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee. Elder Stephens is 
an able advocate of the doctrine of 
God our Saviour as maintained by the 
Primitive or Old School Baptists. For 
nearly half a century he has preached 
Jesus the way, the truth and the life; 
nor has he seen any reason to adul- 
terate the doctrine of grace or to 
change the order of God's house. He is 
satisfied with the practice of the apos- 
tolic church. To move therefrom 
would not be progressive but retro- 
gressive, for their doctrine and their 
practice is perfect and cannot, there- 
fore, be improved. And though Elder 
Stephens has passed his three score 
and ten, yet he is still active and. 
faithful to his charge; and his church, 
is perhaps, the only one among our 
people in the United States that has 
services every Sunday at 11 o'clock 
and at night. The editor regrets that 
he could not obtain data for a more 
extended notice of the life and labors 
of this gifted and zealous laborer in 
the Master's vineyard. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



255 



W. A. STEWART. 

Stewart, Elder W. A., of Floyd 
County, Ky. After a life of usefulness 
and many years of devotion to the 
cause of truth in the gospel this be- 
loved brother quit the shores of time 
March 3, 1S93. He was a good citizen, 
kind neighbor, able minister, and 
faithful to his churches, and the editor 
regrets that a more suitable notice of 
his life and labors could not appear. 




G. W. STEWART. 



Stewart, Elder G. W., of Akron, 
Hale County, Ala. This gifted brother 
was born in Autaugaville, Ala., May 
17, 1S51, and raised by Christian pa- 
rents. His father, Jeremiah C. Stew- 
art, was a strict member, and his 
grandfather was an elder in the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church. Early in youth 
Elder Stewart manifested a desire for 
research and a spirit of self-righteous- 
ness. In his eighteenth year he read the 
entire Bible through, felt elated in his 
mind and exalted in his opinion of 
himself. He would not join any church 
but felt he could, at any time, become 
a Christian, which he fully intended 
tci do before he died, but wanted to 
wait until a more convenient season. 
When he heard the Primitive Baptists 
preach he was perfectly astonished at 
what he considered their doctrine, and 
was one of the most bitter and deter- 
mined enemies of the doctrine of sal- 
vation by grace. He not only did not 
believe the doctrine but abhored it, 
and was determined to never believe 
it. He felt real sorry and truly asham- 
ed for anybody to know that he had 



relatives that were so weak and igno- 
rant as to believe such doctrine. But 
in the fall of 1871, unexpectedly to 
himself, he was convinced of the 
truthfulness of the doctrine, but was 
never able to claim a hope till the 
spring of 1873. He was as completely 
turned about in his views and opin- 
ions, likes and dislikes as was the 
Apostle Paul. In 1873 he was married 
to Miss Catharine Elmira Allen, of 
Hale County, daughter of Elder J. T. 
Allen, and he and wife united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church at Nebo, 
Bibb County, in 1874, and were bap- 
tized by Elder Allen. In 1882 he was 
licensed and in 1885 was ordained by 
Elders R. F. Papasan, J. D. McElroy, 
and J. T. Stewart, and has since had 
the care of churches, having served 
Providence, the church of his mem- 
bership continuously since his ordina- 
tion. Elder Stewart is a strong writer, 
was for sometime associate editor of 
the Gospel Messenger and has writ- 
ter two books that have been well 
received among Baptists, entitled, 
"Order and Disorder," and "The Two 
Witnesses." These books are full of 
wholesome instruction and valuable 
information, and shows the Biblical 
knowledge and general information 
possessed by their author. 



J. M. STEWART. 

Stewart, Elder J. M. (1839-1904), of 
Texas. Elder Stewart was born in 
Georgia, and in 1865 was married to 
Miss Fannie Patillo of Marietta, Ga. 
This union was blessed with eleven 
children. In 1891 he moved to Texas 
and lived in this state until his death 
— thirteen years later. He was ordain- 
ed ab'iut 1866 and served churches 
both in Georgia and Texas. He was 
an able minister. His discourses were 
pointed, forcible, instructive and gen- 
tle, and it is with regret that a more 
detailed notice of Elder Stewart could 
not be given. 



BENNETT STEWART. 

Stewart, Elder Bennett, of Georgia, 
was born in Warren County, Septem- 
ber 15, 1822, and died at his home in 
Taylor Ccmnty, February 15, 1897, of 
general debility of body and mind. 
Elder Stewart was well and favorably 
known in his section of the country, 
having lived here about a half cen- 
tury. He kept himself well posted on 
all points of public interest, and, being 



256 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



freely communicative, his views and 
opinions were sought generally by 
others and highly regarded, even by 
those who differed with him. He was 
a man of far more than ordinary 
mind, and "where much is given much 
is required," and with the gift invari- 
ably comes the responsibility. This 
Elder Stewart sensibly felt, and he 
therefore was never vain, but invari- 
ably humbled, when preferred or pro- 
moted, which favors his neighbors and 
fellcw-eitizens delighted to confer 
upon him. He could, indeed, be hon- 
ored by men, because God had honor- 
ed him. Therefore, if he was chosen 
as literary teacher or as orator of the 
day on occasions of interest or to rep- 
resent his county, all were delighted, 
himself humbled, and the expectations 
of his friends not disappointed; for he 
always proved himself worthy and suf- 
ficient for the occasion. Such was his 
unusual, exemplary life and unusual 
usefulness. But above all, and better 
than all, Christ was revealed to him 
as his Saviour, and, in obedience to 
the command of his Saviour, he unit- 
ed with the church at Prosperity in 
1866, and was baptized by Elder J. 
Rowe. He was chosen clerk of the 
church in 1867, and chosen deacon in 
1869. But the church soon discovered 
in him what they considered the gift 
of teaching and comforting the saints, 
and accordingly liberated him to ex- 
ercise that gift as he felt impressed. 
He was, in 1879, ordained by Elders 
John Rowe, J. R. Respess and J. G. 
Murray. This was an obligation 
which made him exceedingly fear and 
quake. Elder Stewart was abundantly 
blessed with those special graces 
which so much adorn the profession 
he made — meekness, lowliness of heart 
and mind, forbearance, brotherly kind- 
ness, resignation to the will of God, 
without murmuring, either at birth or 
death, heat or cold, prosperity, or ad- 
versity, sickness or health. 



J. T. STEWART. 



Stewart, Elder J. T., of Tennessee, 
was born August 11, 1848, in Jones 
County, Ga. In early childhood he 
moved with his parents — Jeremiah 
and Nancy Stewart — to Alabama, 
where he lived until 1904, when he 
moved to Beaver's Creek, Tenn. When 
six or seven years of age he was made 
to realize the solemnity and fearfu'- 
ness of death and would often resort 
to a certain place nearby to try to 
pray. These feelings eventually wore 



away as he became mere infatuated 
with the world. When about fourteen 
years old he ran away from his pa- 
rents and joined the Confederate 
army where he remained until the 
close of the war. It was, while in the 
last engagement in the early part of 
'65 while the missiles of death were 
flying thick and fast, that he was 
deeply convicted of sin and made to 
mourn on account of it. When, some- 
time afterward, this burden was re- 
moved he had a strong desire to 
unite with the church, which he did 




J. T. STEWART 

at Providence, Hale County, Ala., in 
1868. Soon he was made to realize 
that there were other duties for him 
to perform. The church discovered his 
gift, and he was soon licensed, and 
in 1881 was ordained by Eiders J. J. 
Akers, H. J. Redd and C. Whitworth. 
He has since had the care of churches 
— a part ofi the time serving five, is 
sound in the faith, and zealous in the 
cause of truth. In early life he was 
married to Miss Rebecca Tommay, 
daughter of Elder Hiram Tommay, 
and the Lord has blessed them to rear 
ten children.. 



JAMES STINNETT. 



Stinett, Elder James, of Texas, was 
born December 4, 1817, in Marion 
County, Tenn., and was the son ol 
Samuel and Elizabeth Stinnett. He 
joined Clarks Creek Church in Hen- 
derson County, Tenn., in 1846 and 
was baptized by Elder James Beaver. 
In 1865 he moved to Texas and set- 
tled in Hopkins County. Elder Stin- 
nett was a man of sterling character. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



257 



As a husband he was faithful and 
true; as a father he was firm, oui 
gentle and kind; as a minister cf 
the gospel he was bold for the truth, 
yet so sweet, kind and gentle., and it 
is with regret that a more complete 
sketch of his useful life could not be 
given. ■ — 




GEORGE Y. STIPP. 

Stipp, Elder George Y., of Pulaski, 
111., was born in Warren County, O., 
April 13, 1S26, and died October 23. 
18S6. He was of German de- 
scent. His grandparents settled and 
lived in Pennsylvania and Virginia. 
As a boy he manifested a thirst for 
knowledge and became a prominent 
teacher, which profession he followed 
until about 187G. He was also a suc- 
cessful farmer and gave much study 
to law and became well versed in its 
fundamentals, though he did not fol- 
low the profession as a practitioner. 
He was married three times — 
first to Miss America A. Smith. 
This union was blessed with nine 
children. His second wife was Miss 
Mary E. Hughes, and after her 
death in 1871, he was in 1875, married 
to Miss Elizabeth H. Hursey. He 
united with Hopewell Church in Ver- 
million County, Ind., 1870, and began 
preaching the same year, and was or- 
dained in 1S75 by Elders J. A. Jclm- 
son, James Ring and Pallas McCoy, 
and until his death was a faithful min- 
ister. Elder Stipp was a strong debater, 
and his willingness to defend the prin- 
ciples of salvation and all Bible truths 
paved the way for several religious 
discussions, in all of which he mani- 
fested much Biblical knowledge and 
ability. His last discussion was held 
at Kenney, 111., in 1886. His opponent 



was W. B. F. Treat, of Bloomington, 
Ind., of the "Disciples of Christ." Mr, 
Treat came very highly recommended 
by the brotherhood of his faith. The 
subjects discussed embraced, total de- 
pravity, the quickening" of sinners (the 
written word the essential means), 
baptism essential to the remission of 
sins, and church identity. The St. 
Joseph correspondence of the Cham- 
paign Signal had this to say: "For the 
past week or so the village of Ken- 
ney, 111., has been convulsed over a 
series of religious debates between G. 
Y. Stipp, of Vermillion County, 111., 
and Rev. W. B. F. Treat, of Blooming- 
ton, Ind. This discussion ended the 
other day, and the logic used by Mr. 
Stipp was so overwhelmingly superior 
to that used by his antagonist that he 
was universally declared to be the 
champion in the debate. The people 
of Kenney had manifested so much in- 
terest in the matter, that when the 
debate closed a number of the promi- 
nent citizens of the place, non-church- 
members, showed their appreciation 
of the talent of Elder Stipp by club- 
bing together and presenting him with 
a handsome gold-headed, ebony cane. 
Miss Sallie Turner made the presen- 
tation speech, in which Mx. Stipp was 
warmly thanked for his gentlemanly 
demeanor during the discussion, and 
for the ability with which he handled 
the subjects." 




JOHN STIPP. 

Stipp, Elder John, of Oregon, was 
born in Berkeley County, Va., Novem- 



258 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ber 10, 1806, and moving to Illinois in 
the year 1832, there united with the 
Primitive Baptists. He removed to Or- 
egon in 1848, and was there ordained 
in 1853, in Siloam Church. He was a 
good writer and was mighty in the 
Scriptures. He died November 23, 
1892. Further information of this use- 
ful minister's life and labors could not 
be obtained by the editcr. 




W. B. STRICKLAND. 

Strickland, Elder W. B., of Scotland 
Neck, N. C. This worthy brother was 
born June 16, 1848. In early manhooa 
he was convicted of sin and in his 
twenty-eighth year of age was given 
a sweet hope in Jesus as his sin-bear- 
er. During the same year — 1876 — he 
went home to his friends at Law- 
rence's Church, Edgecombe County 
N. C, and told them what great things 
the Lord had done for him, was re- 
ceived and baptized by Elder W. F. 
Bell. Not long after this he was bur- 
dened with the duty of preaching 
Jesus to others, but unlike Paul, he 
conferred with flesh and blood, and sc 
unworthily did he feel and so unqual- 
ified did he deem himself for the min- 
isterial wcrk that he endeavored to 
keep the secret in his own bosom, 
earnestly plead with the Lord to re 
lieve him of the impression and felt 
that he would rather die than try to 
preach. But God made him willing and 
he was, in 1889 licensed, and soon 
thereafter ordained, and has since 
had the care of churches. Elder 
Strickland is highly regarded by his 
brethren, is sound in the faith and is 
a comforting experimental preacher. 



JAMES STRICKLAND. 

Strickland, Elder James, of Fort 
Branch, Ind., was born in the state of 
Indiana, on the 27th day of October, 
1818; joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church, about the year 1838, and was 
ordained to the work of the ministry 
about the year 1845. He was very 
zealous in the building up of churches 
and there was a period of ten years 
in his life that he was in a revival. 
He baptized one thousand people dur- 
ing his ministry, He was strong in the 
faith of the atonement, and was a 
man of great piety and of good gen- 
eral information. When he died in Oc- 
tober, 1890, he was pastor cf Fort 
Branch Church and was greatly loved 
by his brethren. His labors were most- 
ly confined to the churches of the Sa- 
lem Association where his efforts 
were greatly blessed. 




RUBEN T. STRICKLER. 

Strickler, Elder Ruben T., of Luray, 
Va. This good-natured, deserving and 
worthy brother is the pastor of 
Brock's Gap, Big Spring, Bentonville. 
and Thornton's Gap churches. (The 
last named church was, many years 
ago, the home church of Wm. Jen- 
nings Bryan's grandparents, and their 
grandson, in 1896, presented the old 
church with two chairs in memory ot 
them.) Brother Strickler was born 
August 9, 1854, and in early youth was 
convicted of sin and given a sweet 
hope in Jesus, but for many years he 
remained out of the church awaiting 
more evidence, and also, on account 
of a feeling sense of unworthiness, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



259 



and before his baptism had impres- 
sions to preach. He united with the 
church in 1879, baptized by Elder P. 
W. Yates, licensed 1883, and was in 
1887 ordained by Elders P. Wl Yates, 
J. H. Menifee, Benj. Lampton and F. 
M. Perry. Besides the above named 
churches Elder Strickler has served 
Hope Church in Warren and Smith's 
Creek in Shenandoah. He is an hum- 
ble, unassuming, faithful minister — 
as honest as the days are long, and 
prefers others to himself, and is a 
great lover of peace. He has never 
traveled much, his labors being con- 
fined tc churches within the bounds 
of the Ebenezer and Ketocton Associa- 
tions. 



A. J. STUART. 

Stuart, Elder A. J. (1823-1895), was 
born in Monroe County, Ga. ; moved 
with his parents to Scott County, 
'Miss., in 1843 and in 1846 was mar- 
ried to Miss Elizabeth Mathews. He 
united with the Primitive Baptists 
at New Chappel Church 1856, and was 
baptized by Elder J. G. Creceluis. In 
1870 he was crdained and faithfully 
filled this office until his death. By 
economy and close attention to bus- 
iness he was enabled to leave a com- 
fortable living to those dependent 
upon him, but better still, he left a 
good name "which is rather to be 
chosen than great riches." Amid all 
trial and suffering he manifested 
Christian fortitude and a faith in 
God's gocdness that never wavered, 
and died as a faithful witness of 
Jesus. 



DAVID STUART. 

Stuart. Elder David (1822-1892), was 
born in Illinois, united with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church when a young 
man and was ordained in 1863. He 
was a faithful pastor and the editor 
regrets that a suitable sketch of his 
life and labors could not be obtained 
for this work. 

OWEN SUMNER. 

Sumner, Elder Owen (1796-1874), 
was a native of Floyd County, Va. Of 
his early history the writer knows 
nothing except that with all Adam's 
family he was conceived in sin and 
brought forth in iniquity, and contin- 
ued to rcll sin under his tongue as a 



sweet morsel until arrested by the 
Spirit of God; when, he viewed him- 
self the worst of mankind, and moan- 
ed his condition for many days, when 
it pleased the Lord to manifest his 
love to him in the pardon of his sins. 
He then was enable to rejoice with 
joy unspeakable and full of glory. He 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at West Fork, in Floyd Coun 
ty, Va., Sunday, March 17, 1822, and 
was baptized by Elder Jesse Jones. 
He lived with the church in peace and 
enjoyed their confidence and fellow- 
ship, and September, 1832, the church 
licensed him to preach the gospel of 
Christ. He went forward in the dis- 
charge of his duty with great fear 
and trembling, often doubting his 
call; but, to use his own words — he 
felt unable to preach, but could not 
remain silent, but was often praying 
to the Lord to direct him what to do, 
and as the impression deepened he 
continued to exercise his gift in the 
ministry, not without opposition from 
the enemies, until September 3, 1836, 
when having made full proof of his 
ministry and usefulness he was or- 
dained to the full functions of the 
ministry, and went forward in the ad- 
ministration of the ordinances of the 
house of God. Elder Sumner certainly 
made full proof of his ministry. He 
had but a limited education, but by 
close application to study he acquired 
considerable knowledge of books. He 
traveled considerably, in Virginia 
mostly, and preached Jesus and him 
crucified, with power. Several 
churches were built up under his min- 
istry. He was pastor of Indian Creek, 
New River Meadow Creek, White Oak 
Grove and Laurel Creek churches, un- 
til age and infirmities prevented him 
from serving Lhem. The Lord added 
many seals to his ministry — among 
the number he had the pleasure of 
seeing five or six of the members of 
the churches which he served embark 
in the ministry and rise to distinction 
among the Baptists. Among them, one 
of his sons (but his ministry was 
short, as he died several years before 
his father.) Elder Sumnei often spoke 
of the young ministers as his sons in 
the ministry, and treated them as 
such, often encouraging them, and 
both by precept and example, admon- 
ishing them to be faithful and humble 
in the discharge of their duties. He 
did not envy them but appeared tc be 
happy in their company, always set- 
ting them forward and never appear- 
ed more happy than when they were 
enabled to preach comfortingly. He 
was a good disciplinarian and the 



260 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



churches over which he was pastor 
loved him for his firmness, He was 
useful in his neighborhood as a peace- 
maker and also as a physician, having 
acquired considerable knowledge of 
medicine, and by industry he acquired 
a competent living and his house was 
a home for his brethren and friends. 
Just before his departure he said: "I 
am waiting for my Master's time, to 
go! I am ready when it is His pleas- 
ure to call." In his death his wife 
lost an affectionate companion, his 
children a loving father, the churches 
a wise counsellor and faithful pastor. 




W. B. SUTHERLAND. 

Sutherland, Elder W. B., of Tiny, 
Va., was born near Colley, Dickenson 
(then Buchanan) County, Va., Febru- 
ary 24, 1861. His parents were William 
and Sylvia (Counts) Sutherland, who 
came as pioneers from Clinch Valley, 
Va., over Sandy Ridge to the head- 
waters cf Big Sandy River over fifty 
years ago, and who are still living 
near their old homestead. His family 
has been long and prominently con- 
nected with the Primitive Baptists. 
During his- youth, he- followed the 
usual life ofl a mountain boy, going to 
the old "subscription" and free 
schools for a few weeks during the 
winter and the remainder of the time 
doing labor on a farm. He joined the 
Primitive Baptists at Sulphur Spring 
Church, Dickenson County, Va , of 
which church he is still a member, 
was ordained in 1884 by Elders J. H. 
Duty and Elijah S. Counts, and has 
continued in this work unremittingly 
and faithfully till the present day. For 



several years, he has been the only 
minister in his community, and has 
had the care of four or more churches 
almost continuously and is at present 
serving the following churches: Sul- 
phur Spring and Sand Lick in Dicken- 
son County; Sumac Grove and Duty's 
View, in Buchanan County; and 
Reed's Valley, in Russell County. His 
brethren, recognizing his talents, and 
love for the cause elected him in 1879, 
Moderator of the Washington Asso- 
ciation (an organization of the Prim- 
itive faith, formed in 1811 and em- 
bracing some of the most prosperous 
churches of that faith in southwest 
Virginia), in which position he still 
serves. Elder Sutherland's activities 
have not been confined alone to the 
ministry, but he has been, for several 
years, an important figure in the pub- 
lic life of his county, — serving several 
terms as supervisor of his district, 
and also a member of the Virginia 
legislature for the session of 1895-6. 
He is honored as a loyal citizen, es- 
teemed as a kind neighbor and be- 
loved as a faithful pastor and able 
minister of the New Testament. 



JOHN A. SUTTLES. 

Suttles, Elder John A., of Alabama, 
was born in Bibb County, Ala., May 
12, 1826. He for years served his coun- 
ty as justice of the peace, county 
treasurer, and representative in the 
general assembly of Alabama. He was 
first married to Miss Rebecca E. Bent- 
ley, and subsequently to Miss Mbllie 
J. Carlisle. He first joined the Mis- 
sionary Baptists in 1854, and lived a 
consistent member with them until 
August, 1875, when he joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Bethel in 
Coosa County, Ala., and was baptized 
by Elder B. Jowers. He shortly after- 
wards moved his membership to Mt. 
Pleasant Church, and in 1878, he was 
ordained to the gospel ministry, the 
presbytery consisting of Elders B. 
Jowers, J. M. Dykes, J. M. Blackman, 
L. C. Peters, and R. W. Carlisle. In 
his latter days, having been stricken 
with paralysis, he was afflicted long 
and suffered much, but, sustained by 
the grace of God, was perfectly re- 
signed to His will and when the sum- 
mons came ne passed away as calmly 
as the evening setting sun, thus show- 
ing to those left behind how bravely 
and gloriously a Christian can die. 
He was full measure in all that is re- 
quired in constituting a good citizen, 
an honest man, a loving father, a de- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



261 



voted husband, and an humble, faith- 
ful Christian. He exemplified by his 
daily walk that he was ever ready to 
conform to that which was just and 
right, thereby gaining the confidence 
and commanding the esteem of nearly 
all who knew him for his strict in- 
tegrity of character and quiet life. 




JONAS F. SUTTON. 

Sutton, Elder Jonas F., of Paris Mo., 
was born in Miami County, O., June 1, 
1837, and united with Walnut Creek 
Church, near Crawfordsville, Ind., Feb- 
ruary 13, 1869. He moved to Missouri in 
the year 1870 and was ordained in Ced- 
ar Grove Church near Paris, Mo. in De- 



cember, 1888. His orderly walk, devo- 
tion to the cause of his Master, and 
good gift in the ministry, make him 
useful to the churches which he serves 
and it is with regret that data for a 
fuller sketch of this worthy Elder's 
life could not be obtained. 



JAMES T. SWINNEY. 

Swinney, Elder James T., of La- 
F'ountain, Kan., was born in West 
Virginia, August 24, 1832, and united 
with Camp Creek Church in Mercer 
County of that state in December, 
1866. He was ordained in the year 
1869,, and ever since has served as 
pastor of churches. A fuller sketch of 
his labors in the ministry could not 
be secured. 



FREDERICK SWINT. 

Swint, Elder Frederick (1789-1860), 
of Alabama, was in early life convict- 
ed of sin, given a hope in the merito- 
rious work of Jesus, united with the 
Baptists and a few years later was or- 
dained to the gospel ministry. He was 
consdered an able preacher, sound in 
the faith and full of hospitality, and 
his home was always open to his 
brethren. It vas his custom to hold 
family prayer each night when at 
home. He was gifted as a writer also. 
Hymn No. 690 of Lloyd's Collection 
is his composition. He raised a family 
of sixteen children, was a man of gen- 
eral information and wide^ influence 
and died as he lived— trusting in the 
all-sufficient atonement of Jesus for 
salvation. 



CHARLES S. TATE. 

Tate, Elder Charles S. (1811-1888), 
of Kansas. He was born in Bedford 
County, Va , and was received into 
the fellowship of the Baptists before 
the division when he was about twen- 
ty-two years old. About 1847 he moved 
from Virginia to Alabama. Some of 
the brethren had learned by con- 
versing with him that he had exercis- 
ed in preaching a little before leaving 
Virginia, and insisted that he should 
go into the pulpit and preach which he 
did very satisfactorily from the text, 
Hebrew 2.9. Soon after this he 



became a member with the brethren 
at Shawn, in Chambers County, Ala., 
which church was then under the pas- 
toral care of Elder Josephus Barrow. 
Some time after this he moved and 
became a member of the church at 
Hephzibah, in same county, and by 
request of sister churches for his pas- 
toral services, he was ordained and 
had for a time, the pastoral charge cf 
two churches. But being poor in the 
world and a tanner by trade, he had 
to move about to get work, and thus 
his ministerial work became more 
transient and unsettled till finally he 
settled in Kansas. Elder Tate was re- 



262 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



garded as a sound and consistent min- 
ister — not only sound in doctrine, but 
was faithful, zealous and orderly in 
his deportment. 



A. J. TAYLOR. 

Taylor, Elder A. J. (1820-1904), of 
North Caronna. This venerable minis- 
ter of western North Carolina, died at 
his heme in Alleghany County, in his 
eighty-fourth year of age. He was fa- 
miliarly known as "Andy" Taylor, and 
was, of course, named Andrew Jack- 
son, and he had in his makeup the 
sturdiness and independence of Old 
Hickory. He had not been taught in 
the colleges of this earth, but he was 
deeply versed in "The Book" and to 
him "thus sayeth the Lcrd" was the 
final arbiter of every question that af- 
fected this life and the life beyond. 
His Bible was his constant companion 
in his long journeyings over this and 
other states, where he went on yearly 
pilgrimages preaching the gospel. He 
lived in it and with it. It was the staff 
of his declining years as it had been 
the strength and stay of his robust 
manhood. The life of Elder Taylor 
contained lessons for the present hour 
that need to be emphasized. He be- 
longed to a day that gave us many 
noble characters — a day that produced 
men of simple faith, simple tastes, 
unaffected piety, of plain living and 
right thinking. An humble, uneducat- 
ed farmer, high en the slopes of the 
hills of Alleghany, this old patriarch 
heard the call to preach the gospel as 
plainly as ever one of Cod's prophets 
of old was called to do His work. 
Taking neither scrip nor purse, Andy 
Taylor put aside frcm him ease, the 
comforts of home, and for many years 
devoted much of his life to travelling 
and preaching wherever a flock of the 
faithful wished to hear him preach. 
He travelled in many counties and 
states. He preached not with "man's 
wisdom" but in "demonstration of the 
spirit" and was instrumental in com- 
forting and blessing many of God's 
elect who sat under his ministrations. 
The educated found help and guid- 
ance in his plain proclamation of the 
Word; the uneducated saw in him an 
evangel sent to break to them the 
Word cf Life. Elder Taylor clung to 
the old ways and the ancient land- 
marks, in dress, in speech, in every- 
thing. He never felt embarrassed in 
any presence. He would have preach- 
ed before a king as unabashed as Paul 
stood before Agrippa. He was the am- 



bassador of his Lord and knew no 
fear of man or bowing down in the 
presence cf great men. He had about 
him the spirit of the prophet who 
said: "Thou are the man," and he 
never preached to please man, but he 
preached as his Master directed him, 
and declared the whole counsels of 
God. It was a conviction of this good 
old man that he cught not to accept, 
any compensation for preaching. He 
would have felt that he had commit- 
ted sin to receive a salary for preacn- 
ing, and so he went about among his 
people preaching until beyond his 
eightieth year. He lived up to his con- 
victions in this and in every other 
respect. His good old wife, now bereft 
in her humble home in the mountains, 
was an helpmeet of the kind the 
Bible describes. She honored her hus- 
band because he was never "disobe- 
dient to the heavenly vision." She 
gloried in his independence and in his 
services to the churches. She believed 
it would be wrong for her husband to 
charge for preaching. Talking one day 
with a friend, she held up her hands 
and said: "Do you see these olo. 
hands? I would work them to the 
bone before my old man should take 
pay for preaching." She tended her 
garden, milked her cows, and per- 
formed the laborious duties of her 
household in cheerfulness and in hap- 
piness looking forward joyously to the 
time when her husband should return 
from his annual preaching tours, to. 
the delights of home, made doubly 
dear tc both by the consciousness 
that the separation had been ordered 
of God, as was every act of their 
lives. How beautiful is such faith in a 
world where materialism threatens to 
crowd out faith in God and lessen 
faith in man. 



HENRY TAYLOR. 

Taylor, Elder Henry, of Monroe, N. 
C, was born May 27, 1851, in Wash- 
ington County, Va. His parents were 
members of the Primitive Baptist, but 
he, in his seventeenth year, united 
with the New School, or Missionary 
Baptists and lived with them four 
years. About this time he was deeply 
impressed to preach Jesus and be- 
came a close student of the Bible. 
What he learned there of doctrine and 
practice was so different to that of his 
brethren that he left their church and 
united with the Primitive Baptists at 
Tumbling Creek Washington Co., Va., 
1874, and was baptized by Elder C. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



263 



Hopkins. He began preaching the 
same year and was in 1876 ordained 
by Elders John Wallace, Chas. Hop- 
kins, J. T. Stinson and Thos. Grimsley, 
and has since had the care of churches 
or been traveling and preaching. He 
has traveled thousands of miles, most- 




HENRY TAYLOR 

ly in Virginia, Tennessee, North Caro- 
lina, and South Carolina. He is, at 
present, serving the following 
churches: High Hill, Union Grove, 
Crooked Creek and Liberty, all of 
Union County. Elder Taylor is zealous 
and faithful and the Lord Is blessing 
his labors. 



T. J. TAYLOR. 



Taylor, Elder T. J., of Eaglesville, 
Tenn. This able minister is moderator 
of the Cumberland Association of 
Primitive Baptists and the faithful pas- 
tor of churches within the bounds of 
this association. 



W. J. TAYLOR. 

Taylor, Elder, W. J., of Garfield, 
Ark. This faithful minister was con- 
victed of sin when about seventeen 
years old, and for several years was 
greatly burdened on account of it. 
But God, at a time unexpected to him, 
relieved him of this burden and gave 
him, by revelation, a sweet hope in 
Jesus. Soon after this he united with 
the Primitive Baptists and was bap- 
tized by Elder J. Good. Almost im- 
mediately a desire to tell others of 
Jesus came in his heart, which could 
never be satisfied until he went for- 



ward in this duty. He was soon or- 
dained to the work and has since prov- 
en his faith by his works. Has travel- 
ed and preached much among the 




W. J. TAYLOR 



churches of his section, has baptized a 
goodly number into the fellowship of 
the Baptists and at present has the 
care of four churches. 



BURWELL TEMPLE. 

Temple, Elder Burwell, of Johnson 
County, N. C, whc died July 27, 1873, 
was a well beloved minister of many 
Christian virtues. He served the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church at Salem, John- 
son County, and other churches in 
that section and was an humble, faith- 
ful minister, but data for a more suit- 
able sketch of his life and labors 
could not be obtained. 



JOHN TERRY. 

Terry, Elder John, of Hurricane 
County, W. Va., was born in Floyd 
County, Va., December 1, 1844. Moved 
with his parents to West Virginia 
about the year 1850, joined the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in 1870, began 
preaching in 1879, ordained 1885, and 
has since had the care of churches. 
He is at present pastor of two 
churches and is moderator of the Poc- 
atalico Association. He is an able 
preacher, is sound in the doctrine of 
the Bible and is highly esteemed by 
his brethren. 



264 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 




WILLIAM THORP. 

Thorp, Elder William (1772-1853), 
was one of the noted pioneer ministers 
who smoothed the rugged paths of the 
Baptists in the western wilds of Mis- 
souri. He is said to have constituted 
the first church and organized the first 
Association in upper Missouri. He 
was born in Virginia, of Scotch-Irish 
parents who immigrated from the old 
country. From Virginia he moved to 
Kentucky in 1786 when a boy and in 
1809 moved to Missouri and died in 
Clay County after a long, useful and 
faithful life in the Master's vineyard. 



ERASMUS DARWIN THOMAS 

Thomas, Elder Erasmus Darwin of 
Danville, Ind., who after about half a 
century of service as minister in the 
Master's vineyard, passed from this 
scene of action a few years ago in the 
full triumph of the Christian's faith. 
Elder Thomas was born in Fayette 
County, Ind., November 13, 1821, united 
with the Primitive Baptists, October 
27, 1849, and was, the following day, 
baptized into the fellowship of Will- 
iam's Creek Church by Elder John 
Sparks. Two years later he was li- 
censed to preach and on May 14, 1852 
was ordained to the full work of the 
ministry. During his long career in 
the ministry he was able, active and 
zealous in the cause of truth, was a 
bold defender of the faith, and order 
of God's house as maintained by the 
Primitive or Old School Baptists, and 
his labors were blessed to the instruc- 
tion, comfort and edification of many 
of God's children. His name was a 
household word, among the churches 



of the Danville Association of which 
he was so long the beloved Moderator 
as well as among other churches and 
associations that knew his gift and felt 
his good influence. Detail information 
of his useful life and labors could not 
be obtained. 



E. D. THOMAS. 

Thomas, Elder E. D. (1821-1896), of 
Indiana, was born in Fayette County. 
He was the son of David F. and 
Phoebe Thcmas who emigrated from 
New York state in a very early day. 
In early manhood he was married to 
Mary G. Thompson, the daughter of 
Wilson Thompson, who has a national 
reputation as a minister of the gcspel 
in the Baptist Church. He received a 
hope in Christ at about the age of 
twenty, but did not unite with the 
church until nine years afterward. He 
began speaking in public in a short 
time after joining the church and was 
ordained to the full work of the gos- 
pel ministry at the age of thirty 
years. Although he travelled consid- 
erably, yet his greatest work was pas- 
toring churches. He served four 
churches almost constantly during his 
entire ministerial life. One very re- 
markable event of his life was, that 
he served two churches for over forty 
years each. At the time of his death 
he was on his forty-fourth year as 
paster of Big Run Church, ten miles 
southeast of Indianapolis, and on his 
forty-third year as pastor at Danville. 
He left each church with a member- 
ship of nearly one hundred. He died 
at his home near Danville, Ind., at the 
age of seventy-five, having served his 
Master faithfully for nearly half a 
century. 



E. W. THOMAS. 

Thomas, Elder E. W., of Danville, 
Ind.. was born in Marion County Ind., 
October 13, 1859, and is the sixth son 
and eighth child of Elder E. D. Thom- 
as. He was first made to seriously 
consider himself as a sinner at the 
age of sixteen, after four or five 
months of sorrow and trouble over his 
condition, in which time his soul was 
brought to trust in the Lord's sweet 
mercy through Jesus Christ. With a 
great love for Christ, His cause and 
His people, he in 1876 offered himself 
to the dear old church at Mt. Pleas- 
ant, where' he still lives and enjoys 
the fellowship of the Lord's precious 
people, and was baptized by his fath- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



265 



er. At about the age of twenty-four he 
became much impressed in mind 
about preaching the gospel of God's 
grace, but objections of various kinds 
kept him silent until the winter of 
1888-9. His first attempt to preach was 
the second Sunday night of F'ebruary, 
1889, using the text, "This is the 
stone that was set at naught of you 
builders," etc., Acts 4:11. He was or- 
dained in 1S90, by Elders E. D. Thom- 
as, J. H. Oliphant and John R. Daily, 
and has since been continuously en- 
gaged in serving churches as pastor, 
■ — having the care of four churches 
during his entire ministry except the 
first year when he served two. Elder 
Thomas has served his home church 
continuously since his ordination, and 
is loved by his people. 




J. MARSHALL THOMAS. 

Thomas Elder J. Marshall, of Orrs- 
burg, Mo. The editor receiving no in- 
formation from which to write a sketch 
of Elder Thomas will quote the fol- 
lowing from Elder Cash's book of 
Portraits of 1896. "He was born in 
Danville, Ind., February 24, 1867 and 
united with Mt. Pleasant Church, 
Hendricks County, Ind., in February, 
1888. He was ordained July 4, 1896, 
in W'est Union Church, Orrsburg, Mo. 
where his membership now is." 



WILLIAM THOMAS. 

Thomas, Elder William (1821-1893), 
of Texas, the son of John C. and Sarah 



Thomas, was born in Jones County, 
Miss. He was raised by Baptist par- 
ents, professed a hope in Jesus in his 
eighteenth year and united with the 
Methodists. But on a careful study 
of the Bible he found he could not har- 
monize their doctrine and practice 
with his experience and the Bible, and 
in 1841 left his former brethren and 
united with the Primitive Baptists at 
Salem Church in Jasper County, Miss., 
and was baptized by Elder E. Y. Ter- 
rell. From the time he obtained a 
hope, he had impressions to preach 
Jesus the Saviour of sinners; so after 
moving to Arkansas, he soon com- 
menced the exercises of his gift; and 
in 1849 he was liberated to preach; 
and in 1857 was ordained by Elders 
Othniel, Weaver and E. Y. Terrell. 
In 1865 he moved to Milan County, 
Tex., and was in the constitution of 
New Providence Church. In January, 
1867, he bought land and opened a 
farm on Knob Creek in Bell County, 
and .ioined Little Flock Church, which 
church he continued to serve until his 
decease. As a minister he was sound 
in doctrine, uncompromising with er- 
ror, eloquent in his defense of truth, 
and unswerving in the discharge of 
duty, as a pastor he had few equals; 
and God truly blessed his labors with 
Little Flock Church, which he served 
for over twenty-five years. There has 
been dismissed from this church mem- 
bers to constitute three churches, and 
hundreds have moved away, carrying 
letters and the church now numbers 
over eighty. He was loved by all that 
knew him. The church especially was 
made to mourn for his presence, his 
council and his loving admonitions and 
his words of comfort. He died as he 
had lived, trusting alone in Jerms for 
peace and happiness hereafter. 



Z. G. THOMAS. 

Thomas, Elder Z. G, (1833-1882), of 
Louisiana, was born in Barbour 
County, Ala. His parents moved from 
Alabama to Georgia, and then to Ar- 
kansas and remained one year and 
moved to Bienville Parish, La., where 
he spent the remainder of his life, ex- 
cept three years which he spent in 
the Civil war. He was married to M. 
A. Page, 1858, and there were born to 
them twelve children. He united with 
the Primitive Baptist Church at New 
Providence in the fall of 1861, and 
was baptized by Elder T. J. Foster, 
and was ordained to the ministry in 
the spring of 1877, by Elders H. B. 
Howard, Z. Thomas and J. J. White, 



266 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



which place he filled to the glory and 
honor of his glorious King whom he 
trusted in and loved so well to speak 
of until death removed him. He was 
chosen moderator of the Louisiana 
Primitive Baptist Association in the 
fall of 1879, and served in this posi- 
tion to the satisfaction and comfort 
of the association until death. He was 
of a mild temperament, a good, kind 
man; had many friends and was loved 
by them all. He was an able and earn- 
est contender for the doctrine of our 
Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, and 
was a dear and precious gift to the 
church, and the church loved him as 
such. His labors in the Master's vine- 
yard were blessed to the good of the 
church and the glory of God and he 
passed away in the full triumphs of 
faith in the fifty-sixth year of his 
earthly pilgrimage. 



ZACHARIAH THOMAS. 

Thomas, Elder Zachariah (1817-1885) 
was born in Licking County, Ohio, 
moved to Morrow County, Ohio when 
quite young, where, when fifteen years 
of age, he was called by grace from 
"darkness to light," and "from the 
power of Satan to God." He was in 
great distress of mind until he Avas 
led to see Christ as the "end of the 
law for righteousness to every one that 
believeth." In 1840, he was married 
to Elizabeth S. Bruce and they settled 
on a farm near Chesterville, Ohio, in 
1841, where they remained until 1859. 
In April, 1846, thev united with Mt. 
Pisgah Church in Morrow Coiftity, and . 
were baptized by his father Elder 
John D. Thomas. Shortly afterwards 
he became exercised about preaching, 
and the church liberated him in the 
winter of 1847. His father dying in 
April, 1849, left the church without a 
pastor. In June following, he was or- 
dained to the full work of the ministry, 
and was called to the care of Mt. Pis- 
gah church which he retained as long 
as he remained in Ohio. He was also 
pastor of the Alum Creek Church, at 
Ashley, and the Salem Church near 
Johnsville. In 1860, he moved to Lick- 
ing County, and became pastor of the 
Licking and Friendship Churches, 
while retaining charge of Mt. Pisgah 
and Salem. In 1865 he moved to North- 
ern Indiana., locating near Albion, 
Noble County. Here he was instru- 
mental in the organization of two 
churches, Mt. Salem and Elkhart 
which he visited as pastor as long as 
he could travel. He preached his last 



sermon at Elkhart in May, 1884, at 
which time he baptized three young 
sisters. Elder Thomas was greatly 
beloved by all who knew him. As a. 
minister he was faithful and zealous, 
in discourse systematic and logical, 
always presenting some things for 
meditation and causing his hearers to 
feel that the time had not been spent 
in vain. 




WILSON THOMPSON. 



Thompson, Elder Wilson (1788- 
1866), a native of Hillsborough, Ky., 
is regarded as the ablest Primitive 
Baptist minister that ever lived in the 
United States. He was of an old Bap- 
tist family, of English, Welsh, Scotch, 
Irish and German descent. He had re- 
ligious impressions from his earliest 
recollections; and, during the first 
twelve years of his life, without any 
instruction from any person or book, 
he became a thorough graduate in Ar- 
ruinian, Pharisical or natural relig- 
ion — "getting religion" himself by his 
own resolutions and exertions, idol- 
izing "the Sabbath," attaining perfec- 
tion in the flesh, assured that he was 
bound for heaven, despising the peo- 
ple of God, as far below himself in 
religious knowledge and attainments; 
then "falling from grace," "taking his 
fill of sin," then afterwards terrified 
anew by natural convictions, going to 
work again with more zeal than ever 
to ingratiate himself into the favor of 
God, repenting and praying more, and 
doing more good works until he felt 
he was sinless and resolved he never 
would commit another sin. He rested 
in the pursuasion of his own right- 
eousness, with which he believed God 
was well pleased. While in his thir- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



267 



teenth year he went to see Elder 
James Lee baptize some candidates, 
among others, a small slender girl, 
named Mary Grigg, who afterward 
became Elder Thompson's wife; and, 
while this girl was being led into the 
water, suddenly all nature seemed to 
him to be overspread with a dark, 
heavy, angry, threatening gloom, and 
he felt like one forsaken of God and 
man, the most loathsome and guilty 
wretch that ever lived on earth, utter- 
ly corrupt without and within, and 
justly exposed to the everlasting 
wrath of an infinitely holy God. He 
left the company and the water in 
despair, and sought a deep ravine in 
the wood, expecting there to die 
'alone. For three days and nights he 
continued in such gloom that he did 
not seem to have one hopeful thought 
of his salvation, and, while his heart 
was all the time pleading for mercy, 
if mercy were, possible,, he did not dare 
to make a formal prayer, because feel- 
ing it impossible for a holy God to 
pardon such a sinner as himself. Still 
he would seek the woods, fall on his 
knees, close his eyes, and make con- 
fession of his sinfulness and of God's 
justice in his condemnation. While 
thus engaged, on the fourth day, he 
was startled three times by the sud- 
den appearance of a glittering bright- 
ness, visible only when his eyes were 
closed, and each time increasing in 
brilliancy, so that at last in amaze- 
ment he sprang to his feet, opened his 
eyes, and saw all nature glittering 
with the glory of God. He was com- 
pletely captivated with the scene, the 
gloom and the burden of sin were 
gone; but he soon began to be trou- 
bled because his trouble had left him, 
and never once thought of this being 
conversion. After many seasons of re- 
joicings, doubts and fears, he. in 1881, 
united with the church called the 
"Mouth of Hicking," and was baptized 
by Elder Jas. Lee. When raised from 
the water he felt a strong desire to 
speak of the glorious plan of salva- 
tion, but, remaining silent in lan- 
guage, he burst into tears and came 
out of the water weaping like a child. 
For many years he resisted the im- 
pressions to preach, feeling he would 
rather die than expose his ignorance 
in this public way. He was so troubled 
in mind and lost so much sleep and 
appetite that his parents feared he 
would commit suicide and had him to 
sleep in the room with them. One 
night after all had retired, and the 
fire had burned down, a shadowv form 
seemed to approach him, bend over 



him, and say, "I know your trouble, 
and your great desire to know what 
you should do; and I have come to 
tell you. Read the sixth and tenth 
chapters of Matthew, and to every 
sentence, answer, 'I am the man," and 
you will soon come to know your 
duty." This was done and said three 
times. He believed that the appear- 
ance was not literal, but a vision 
(Acts 2:17-18), He was soon licensed 
to preach. His first text, February, 
1810, was John x: 2, 3; and was or- 
dained January, 1812, by Elders 
Stephen Stilley and John Tanner. He 
was about this time led to the then 
Territory of Missouri where he bap- 
tized some four or five hundred per- 
sons. From Missouri he moved to Leb- 
anon, O., and in 1834 moved to Fay- 
ette County, Ind., and became pastor 
of churches in the White Water Asso- 
ciation. During the year of 1843 there 
were two hundred and forty-seven per- 
sons that joined the churches of this 
association. While residing in Indi- 
ana he made extensive tours of 
preaching in New York, New Jersey, 
Delaware, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ken- 
tucky. Virginia, North Carolina and 
Georgia; and his ministerial gifts and 
Christian virtues shone with starry 
brilliancy. Elder Thompson was the 
author of several books and pam- 
phlets, among them "Simple Truth," 
"Triumph of Truth," "An Address to 
the Baptists of the United States," in 
1850, and his "Autobiography." He 
was a strong writer, able debater and 
powerful pulpit orator. Few more in- 
teresting books are to be found in hu- 
man literature than Elder Thompsons' 
autobiography, which may be pur- 
chased from Elder R. W. Thompson, 
Greenfield, Ind. 



G. M. THOMPSON. 

Thompson, Elder G. M., was born 
Apri 1 20, 1811, in Cape Girardeau Coun- 
ty. Mo. His father, Elder Wilson 
Thompson, was one of the greatest 
preachers of the age in which he lived 
and like his gifted son, his fame lives 
after him, for his name is known and 
honored wherever the Primitive Bap- 
tists are found. While the subject of 
this sketch was yet a babe his father 
removed from Missouri to the state of 
Kentucky, and after a short residence 
there, he moved to Ohio, where he 
spent his youth. From Ohio he moved 
to Fayette County, Ind., where he lived 
and labored the most of his life. When 
a mere boy, but seventeen years of age, 



268 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Mr. Thompson joined the Baptist 
Church and began preaching, and from 
that time until death smote him with 
his harness on, he never rested from 
his toil. Indeed, it was said of him 
many years ago by one who knew 
whereof he spoke, that "Elder Grigg 
M. Thompson has traveled more miles 
and preached more sermons than any 
minister living or dead." No doubt 
that statement spoke the truth, for 
during sixty years in storm and snow, 
in good or ill health, he devotedly fol- 
lowed where duty led, often preaching 
twice a day for months at a time, and 



room, the tired hands were folded 
for the long rest, the great heart flut- 
tered and grew still and from the sad- 
dened and silent room "two angels 
issued where but one went in." 




G. M. THOMPSON 

the numbers baptized by him into the 
church, if gathered together would, 
indeed be a mighty host marshaled for 
the army of the Peaceful King. He 
labored not only in the pulpit, but 
also with the pen. He has published 
several books all filled with the faith 
that possessed his soul. That he was 
loved, respected and honored in his 
own community, but weakly expresses 
the feeling of his neighbors. He was 
a strong man in every sense of the 
word, and his pure and reproachless 
life is an example worthy of imitation. 
He died as he had lived. At the very 
last, while speechless friends were 
hovering about his bed, he spoke and 
said: "Turn me, turn me." Some one 
proposed to help turn his body in the 
bed. but he quickly interrupted say- 
ing, "No, no; turn me to the Cross 
of Christ!" These were the last 
words he ever spoke. The death angel 
entered the darkened and silenced 




JOHN M. THOMPSON. 

Thompson, Elder John M., of Green- 
field, Ind., was born in Fayette County, 
Ind., September 1, 1844, of an old noted 
family of Irish, Scotch and English 
descent. His father, James Thomp- 
son, was among the first settlers 
on the Indiana Reserve, fifteen miles 
northeast of Intianapolis, when the 
country was almost an unbroken 
forest. His devoted mother, Eliz- 
abeth McCarty Thompson, died when 
he was in his thirteenth year. The 
opportunities of an education were 
limited but what he lacked in 
this, he made up by improving the 
few he possessed. While working on 
his father's farm, he also applied him- 
self to study spare moments, and was 
soon able to enter college at Harts- 
ville, Ind., where he was soon quali- 
fied to teach and followed this profes- 
sion for some years. When about 
twenty years old he was convicted of 
sin. His Arminian sky became cloud- 
ed, until his self-righteousness was in 
his sight, as "filthy rags." Being with- 
out hope he wept and piteously begged 
for mercy until his soul was delivered 
by the gift of faith in Christ as his 
righteousness, sanctification and re- 
demption. A few months later, he was 
baptized by Elder P. K. Parr, and was 
in 1874 ordained to the work of the 
ministry. Elder Thompson is a strong 
preacher and gifted teacher in Israel 
and has been wonderfully blessed to 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



269 



enlighten the pure in heart, who have 
been deceived by false teachers. He 
has traveled and preached in, per- 
haps a dozen states, and several terri- 
tories devoting his life to pastoral and 
evangelical work, preaching the gospel 
without charge, condemning the greed 
for filthy lucre which actuates the 
ministers of anti-Christ, and yet has 
faithfully advocated spiritual giving 
and receiving. Brother Thompson is 
also a fluent, interesting writer. For 
many years he has been associate edi- 
tor of the Primitive Monator and edi- 
tor of the Youth's Guardian Friend, a 
child's paper, published at Greenfield 
Ind. He has also engaged in eight pub- 
lic debates in answer to challenges 
from Universalists, Adventists, Meth- 
odist and Campbellites, and those who j 
have listened to his arguments have 
felt that the banner of truth has not, 
by him, been allowed to trail in the 
dust. 




ROBERT W. THOMPSON. 

Thompson, Elder Robert W., of 
Greenfield, Ind. The subject of this 
sketch was born in Fayette County, 
Ind., October 11, 1842. He is the 
grandson of Elder Wilson Thompson 
who was a pioneer Old School Bap- 
tist minister of Kentucky, Ohio and 
Indiana. His parents, James L. and 
Elizabeth Thompson, moved to How- 
ard County, Ind., in 1850, while the 
country was yet new. The public 
schools of that day afforded but little 
opportunity to obtain even an ordi- 
nary education. He was reared on the 



farm and was inured to hard labor. 
He was married to Miss Sarah E. 
Hodson August 22, 1SG7. To them 
were born four children, two sons 
and two daughters. At about the age 
of twelve years he was suddenly 
brought under conviction for sin, but 
was gradually led to trust in Christ 
for salvation. In the meantime sin 
generally seemed to have the mas- 
tery. September 16, 1871, he and his 
wife united with Providence Church 
and were baptized the next day by 
Elder Jesse G. Jackson. He was or- 
dained a deacon in this church, wtiich 
position he filled till liberate to ex- 
ercise a gift in public speaking April 
18, 1874. He was ordained to the work 
of the gospel ministry October 21, 
1876. Elder Thompson has since serv- 
ed four churches most of the time; 
has had five public debates; three of 
them with ministers of the Soulsleep- 
er denomination and two with minis- 
ters of the Campbellite denomination. 
He has traveled and preached in the 
states of Delaware, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, New York; Washington, D. 
C, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Geor- 
gia, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, 
Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri and 
Kansas. In 1886, he left the farm and 
moved to Greenfield, Ind., his present 
home, and with Deacon D. H. Goble 
(deceased), started the publication of 
the Primitive Monitor in the interest 
of the Primitive Baptists. Since June, 
1892, Elder Thompson has had full 
control of this popular magazine. He 
is an humble, kind and lovely man, 
tender and sympathetic, yet firm and 
uncompromising with error. A gifted 
speaker and able writer— his influence 
for good is great; his love for the 
cause of truth sincere, and his labors 
in the Master's vineyard unselfishly 
zealous. Elder Thompson is modera- 
tor of the White Water Association. 



JESSE W. THORNTON. 

Thornton, Elder Jesse W. of North 
Yakima, Wash., was born in DeKalb 
County, Mo., January 6, 1850; receiv- 
ed a hope in Christ when ten years 
old; united with the Old School Bap- 
tist Church at Oak Creek, Oregon, 
January, 1893; was ordained to the 
full work of the ministry September 
6, 1902, by Elders W. S, Matthews 
and G. R. Girard. He was a son of 
Deacon John Thornton of Salem 
Church, DeKalb County, Mo., and 



270 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



grandson of Elder Jesse Todd who 
was for a long time pastor of the 
same church. The editor regrets that 




JESSE W. THORNTON 



data for a more detailed sketch of 
Elder Thornton's life and labors could 
not be obtained. 



ELMORE C. THRASH. 

Thrash, Elder Elmore C, of Geor- 
gia, is a plain, social, orderly and 
useful Primitive Baptist, and a sound, 
able and instructive gospel preacher, 
desiring more to minister to the poor 
and destitute churches and communi- 
ties, than to have the regular pastoral 
charge of any church. He has been 
many years in the ministry and is 
now about seventy years of age. The 
editor's efforts to secure data for a 
more suitable sketch proved fruitless. 
We can only add that Elder Thrash is 
not only big in heart and sympathy, 
but also in physique. His altitude is 
six feet four inches. 



D. M. THRASH. 

Thrash, Elder D. M., of Rock Creek, 
Ark., is the faithful pastor of Pleasant 
Grove, and other churches within the 
bounds of the South Arkansas Primi- 
tive Baptist Association and the be- 
loved moderator of that body. 



A. L. THURSTON. 

Thurston, Elder A. L. (1830-1898), 
of Ohio, the son of Isaac and Marga- 
ret Lee Thurston, was born in Butler 
County, O. He was married to Girzilla 



Thurston, December, 1850, and prov- 
ed to her a faithful companion until 
he fell asleep in Jesus in his sixty- 
eighth year of age. Elder Thurston be- 
came a member of the Indian Creek 
Baptist Church near his early home, 
in 1853; was licensed to preach in 
1857, and ordained in 1858. His home, 
during the greater portion of his life, 
was in Franklin County, Ind., and his 
ministerial labors were principally in 
that county, though he often, in his 
early life, visited and preached for 
the churches in adjoining counties in 
Indiana, and also, in Ohio and Ken- 
tucky. When he moved to Indiana he 
united with Big Cedar Grove Church, 




A. L. THURSTON 

one of the oldest Baptist churches in 
Franklin County. Almost his first ef- 
forts in speaking were at that church, 
which he afterward serve year after 
year as pastor, from 1861 till his 
death. He made no attempt to be a 
great preacher, but he was a faithful 
pastor, always at his post; and when, 
near the close of his life, his health 
failed so he could not stand and 
speak, he sometimes sat in his chair 
and talked to his brethren, telling 
them "the old, old story" that is ever 
new, of God's love and mercy to sin- 
ful man. 



EPPE TILLERY. 

Tillery, Elder Eppe, of Missouri, who 
died many years ago, was one of the 
pioneer preachers of northwest Mis- 
souri, and served several years as 
Moderator of Nodaway Association. 
Information from which to prepare a 
suitable sketch of this faithful and use- 
ful minister's life could not be secured. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



271 



J. N. TIPTON. 

Tipton, Elder J. N., of Georgia, was 
born in Decatur County, united with 
the Primitive Baptists in 1877 and 
was baptize by Elder J. T. Everett 
unto the fellowship of the Olive Grove 
Church of Decatur County. His youth- 
ful training was under the Free Will 
Baptist discipline, a religion that he 
persistently tried to believe, but when 
his eyes had been opened, as it were, 
by revelation, he saw plainly, as set 
forth in the Scriptures, that none 
could come unto the Saviour except 
the Father draw them. Soon after he 
united with the church he was or- 
dained and called to the care of Olive 
Grove church, where he ably expound- 
ed the Scriptures to his hearers for 
about ten years prior to his death. 
He bore his afflictions with untiring 
patience. His mind grew faint pertain- 
ing to things of this world before his 
parting hour, but the great Jehovah 
he never forgot, constantly asking His 
mercy and protection on his dear 
household, at the same time asking 
forgiveness in behalf of some who 
had in years past been his persecut- 
ors, as he felt without a cause, thus 
manifesting the forgiving spirit of his 
■divine Master. 



JESSE TODD. 

Todd, Elder Jesse, (1792-1865),of 
TJeKalb County Mo., was born in 
South Carolina, and united with Vina 
Fork Church in Kentucky when about 
grown. Moving to Missouri he first 
settled in Howard County, and in De- 
Kalb in the year 1839, where he was in 
the constitution of the first church in 
the county — Bethlehem Church — in De- 
cember, 1842. He was ordained to the 
work of the ministry August 6. 1845, 
and served Bethlehem Church as past- 
or about thirty years, and was a faith- 
ful servant in the Master's vineyard. 
The editor regrets that, for want of re- 
liable information, a detailed sketch 
of Elder Todd's life and labors could 
not be given. 



JESSE TOMLIN. 

Tomlion, Elder Jesse (1798-1879), of 
Dale County, Ala. The subject of this 
notice was born in South Carolina, 
was removed by his parents, at the age 
of nine years to Georgia, where he 
was reared to manhood, passing 
through childhood and youth with the 



praise of the community for his un- 
flinching morality and strong resolu- 
tions for truth and justice. He obtain- 
ed an evidence of being born of the 
Spirit at about the age of twenty-five 
years, joined the Baptist Church, and 
a few years after was appointed dea- 
con. Not many years later he was or- 
dained to the work of the gospel min- 
istry in which he labored faithfully 
and efficiently half a century, being 
exceedingly well versed in the scrip- 
tures, in doctrine sound and uncom- 
promising, and serving from five to 
seven churches a portion of the time. 
He was accounted by his brethren as 
an uncommonly able disciplinarian, 
being mild and gentle in his manner. 
He was much loved by the brother- 
hood, and highly respected by all who 
knew him, was very tender and in- 
structive to young Christians, and es- 
pecially helpful to young ministers. 




SAMUEL TROTT. 

Trott, Elder Samuel (1783-1866), of 
Virginia, was born in New Hampshire, 
and was baptized into the fellowship 
of the Baptist Church in Morristown, 
N. J., in 1810 by Elder Parkinson of 
New York. He began preaching the 
following year and was ordained at 
'Morristown in 1812. He took a most 
important part in the division of the 
Old School from the New School Bap- 
tists and firmly opposed all depar- 
tures from the doctrine and practice 
of the apostolic church. For a time he 
preached in Kentucky. During the 
last many years of his life he lived in 
or near Fairfax, Va., traveling on 
horseback, serving a number of 
churches in Virginia, and visiting the 
Black Rock Church and other 



272 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



churches of the Baltimore Associa- 
tion. Elder Gilbert Beebe wrote of 
him: "We have been personally ac- 
quainted with our dear brother about 
forty-five years, and from our earliest 
acquaintance have looked up to him 
as to a father for consel and instruc- 
tion, which he has been enabled to 
give. We have always found him 
ready to speak a seasonable word to 
us when occasion required. Like 
David and Jonathan we have loved 
each other; facing the same toes, 
bearing the same testimony, engaged 
in the same conflicts and participating 
in the same victories, suffering the 
same reproaches, encountering the 
same persecutions for the truth's 
sake; is it strange, now that he is 
taken from us, that we should ex- 
claim, as did Elisha, when he saw 
Elijah taken up to heaven in a fiery 
chariot: 'My father! my father! the 
chariot of Israel and the horsemen 
thereof.' " Elder R. C. Leachman 
wrote of him: "He has been actively 
engaged in the ministry for more than 
sixty years. It was not with him as, 
alas! it is with too mony, a work of 
convenience, or of secondary iniport- 
anace, but was regarded as the great 
and leading business of his life. 
Through sunshine and storm, winter 
and summer, he was faithful to his 
appointments, and seemed to be al- 
ways laden with gospel treasure. No 
man seemed to feel more sensibly his 
dependance upon God, and none seem- 
ed to be more constantly furnished 
unto every good word and work. To a 
naturally strong and logical mind he 
added a liberal education, and a rich 
endowment of spiritual gifts rarely 
found combined in the same individ- 
ual. We have traveled many thousand 
miles together, and I have heard him 
preach more discourses than I have 
any other man, and I think I can truly 
say that I never heard him preach 
that he did not say something I had 
never heard him say before." 



JAMES M. TRUE. 

True, Elder James M. (1823-1908). 
This highly esteemed and well known 
minister of the gospel of Christ was 
born in Kentucky united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Little 
Bethel, near Mattoon, 111., and was bap- 
tized by Elder Threlkild, in March, 
1843. He was for many years, engaged 
in mercantile pursuits in Mattoon, 111., 
where he was married to Miss Nancy 
B. Threldild, September 21, 1843. Six 



children were born to them, four dying 
in infancy, and one Alvira Ellen, at 
twenty years of age. One daughter, 
Mrs. Lillie A. Hayes, survives him. 
His wife having died at Seward, Neb., 
in 1890, he was again married to Mrs. 
Candace Mariam Kester, at Kansas, 
111., June 1, 1891. At the beginning of 
the Civil war in 1861, he organized a 
company, of which he was commis- 
sioned captain June 20 1861, and it 
was known as Company E., Thirty- 
eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
was promoted to colonel in June, 1862, 
and placed in command of the Sixty- 
second Illinois Infantry. He held this 
rank until March 6, 1865, when he was 
promoted to the rank of brigadier gen- 
eral, and was discharged May 1, 1865. 
He was appointed United States consul 
to Kingston, Canada.. February 20, 
1874; the appointment being acknow- 
ledged by Queen Victoria April 6, 1874. 
He served in this capacity for four 
years. He was ordained to the full 
work of the gospel ministry October 
18, 1879 in West Liberty Church, Des- 
Moines County, Iowa. Elder True was 
an able expounder of the word; and 
uncompromising in doctrinal positions, 
but mild and humble in his presenta- 
tion of the truth. He was truly a noble 
man, respected alike by friend and foe 
for his steadfastness and unswerving 
honesty in whatsoever he deemed to 
be right, and loved by all who were fav- 
ored with an intimate acquaintance 
with him. He hath done what he 
could; always contending for the right, 
as he was enabled to see it; and he 
died rejoicing in the faith of the Son 
of God as his blessed and only Saviour. 



RUSSELL TUCKER. 

Tucker, Elder Russell (1820-1883), 
was a native of Nash County, N. C. 
When about twenty years of age he 
experienced a hope in Christ, and was 
baptized by Elder Thomas Crocker in- 
to the fellowship cf the church at 
Peach Tree. After speaking as a licen- 
tiate several years, he was, in 1860, 
ordained to the ministry by Elders 
John H. Daniels and Robt. D. Hart. 
He served Peach Tree, Sandy Grove, 
Hickory Rock and Castalia churches; 
was a good farmer, a kind neighbor, 
an excellent citizen, industrious, eco- 
nomical and liberal, a diligent student 
cf the Scriptures, and a plain and 
earnest preacher of Christ and Him 
crucified as the only and all-sufficient 
Saviour of sinners. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



273 




A. P. TUCKER. 

Tucker, Elder A. P., of .Maultrie, 
Ga , was born January 12, 1859. He is 
the twentieth child of his father — 
Elder Henry C. Tucker, who was mar- 
ried three times and was the father of 
thirty-one children. Elder Tucker was 
married in 1878, united with the Prim- 
itive Baptist at Bethsada Church in 
Colquitt County, Ga., in 1885, and was 
in 1891, ordained after serving- 
churches as a licensed preacher for 
about twc years. Since his ordination 
he has had the care of churches, 
sometimes serving as many as six. 
Has baptized a great number of per- 
sons, assisted in the ordination oi 
several ministers and deacons ana 
aided in the constitution of six or 
eight churches. He writes the editoi 
that he has failed to record the num- 
ber of couples he has married, but 
a great many, he remembers of six- 
teen in three months; the oldest, the 
groom seventy-four and bride sixty- 
four; the youngest groom sixteen and 
bride fourteen; the two oldest per- 
sons baptized eighty-one and eigthy- 
five, and the youngest thirteen years 
of age. Elder Tucker is full of zeal 
in the cause of truth and desires to 
be found faithfully contending for the 
faith once delivered unto the saints. 



GREENVILLE L. TUGGLE. 

Tuggle, Greenville L. (1834-1885), 
was born in Partick County, Va., uni- 
ted with the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Jack's Creek, Patrick County in 
May 1854, and baptized by Elder Dan- 
iel Conner, and remained an orderly 



member of this church until death. 
Elder Tuggle was in 1858, licensed by 
the church to preach wherever God 
might cast his lot and in August, 1859, 
he was ordained by Elders Joshua 
Adams, Daniel Conner and Claiborne 
Plaster to the administering of ordi- 
nances. He was the pastor of two 
churches at the time of his death. The 
church at West Fork, Floyd County, 
Va., he had served as their faithful 
pastor some twenty-four or twenty-five 
years; he had served the church at 
Jack's Creek, Patrick County, Va., 
near eight years with much faithful- 
ness and promptitude. He was a gift- 
ed minister of the gospel of the Son 
of God, and also straight forward in 
what he believed to be in accordance 
with the word of God and turned 
neither to the right or left to court 
the favor or applause of any, and 
thereby made some enemies, and suf- 
fered much persecution for truth's 
sake though he seemed to bear it with 
much patience and Christian forti- 
tude, and was often made to rejoice 
that he was counted worthy to suffer 
shame for Christ's sake. He was faith- 
ful until the end and peacefully pass- 
ed over the river of death in full as- 
surance of rest beyond. The following 
acostic was written in his memory, 
and appears among the records of 
Elder Tuggles' church: 
Gone, gone is our brother, so noble 

and true, 
Respected by many, fondly loved by a 

few; 
Even now we are weeping, though 

tears are in vain; 
Even now he is sleeping that sleep 

which is gain. 
No winter, no sorrow, no persecution 

there — 
Light not of the sun shines eternally 

fair. 
Tossed often in tempest and comfort- 
ers gone, 

"Unwavering for truth he went valiant- 
ly on 
Giving courage to the drooping and 

cheer to the faint, 
God alone knows the goodness of this 

heaven-born saint; 
Loving and tender, yet shunning ap- 
plause, 
Enduring to the end in his blessed 
Lord's cause. 



IRA TURNER. 

Turner, Elder Ira, of Missouri, was 
born in Gibson County, Ind., Novem- 
ber 30, 1843, and was the youngest of 
a family of twelve children. He was 
raised up under the religious in flu- 



274 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



ence of the Unitarians — sometimes 
called New Lights, but when about 
fifteen years old he united with the 
Free Will Baptists. Within a few 
months he learned that if his relig- 
ious experience was true that he was 
in the wrong place for it wculd not 
fit with their doctrine of salvation. 
About this time he was persuaded by 
a friend to go into an Old School Bap- 
tist meeting house where he for the 
first time heard a Baptist sermon 
preached by Elder Jcel Hume. He was 
greatly comforted, felt he had found 
his people, and in October of the 
same year — 1860 — asked for a home 
among them, was received at Salem 
Church, Ind., and baptized by Elder 
Hume. In 1868 he moved to the fron- 
tier of Kansas and there, during the 
same year, he made his first attempt 
to preach Jesus to others. Soon two 




IRA TURNER 



churches were organized, called Little 
Zion and Rich Valley, and in 1871 he 
was ordained by Elders Ezekiel Field- 
ler, M. F. Hedges, and W. W. Polk. 
Since his ordination Elder Turner has 
served churches in Indiana, Illinois, 
and Missouri, and traveled and 
preached in many states. His knowl- 
edge of vocal music was excellent, his 
preaching was ncted for its variety 
and success attended his labors. In 
1889 he was called to the care of 
churches in Boone County, Mo., and 
though these churches, and others in 
the Salem Association, were at the 
time weak, they have since built up 
until this is the strongest association, 



numerically, in Misscuri, — some of 
the churches numbering from one to 
two hundred in membership. Elder 
Turner is at present, moderator of 
this association,, is an able presiding 
officer, a gifted preacher and loves 
the Baptists and the doctrine dear to 
them. For about forty years he has 
contended earnestly for the doctrine 
and practice of the Apostolic Church 
and is satisfied with the good old way 
wherein is rest and peace. 




FRANKLIN M. TURNER. 



Turner, Elder Franklin M., of Han- 
nibal, Mo, was born July 16, 1837, and 
united with Bear Creek Church, near 
Hannibal, November 7, 1863. He was 
crdained September 5, 1868, and 
preached acceptably for the churches 
until his death. His high standing 
among men was attested by the fact 
that he was sent to represent his 
county in the legislature. He died 
February 8, 1879. The editor's efforts 
to obtain data from which to prepare 
a more suitable sketch of Elder Tur- 
ner, proved in vain. 



E. B. TURNER. 

Turner, Elder E. B., of Virginia, 
who died several years ago, was born 
in Henry County, Va., August 14, 
1801; raised by Christian parents; 
convicted of sin in his twenty-fourth 
year while witnessing the baptism of 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



275 



some persons; went to the law for 
righteousness and under this school- 
master learned the exceeding sinful- 
ness of sin and that the wages of sin 
is death; was led to the cross and 
found in Jesus a complete Saviour; 
united with the Baptists at Town 
Creek Church, Henry County, Va., and 
was baptized by Elder Wilson Turner. 
Soon after uniting with the church he 
was elected clerk, and later deacon, 
but the church discovered in him the 
ministerial gift and he was licensed, 
and a few months after this he was 
ordained by Elders Kelly, Walker, 
Winter and Martin. Elder Turner, was 
until his death a faithful pastor of 
churches and for a long time was 
moderator of the Pig River Associa- 
tion. In his eighty-fourth year 
Elder Turner wrote: "I can now say 
that during my pilgrimage, and partic- 
ularly in my ministerial labors, I have 
tried to be faithful in trying to pro- 
mote the peace and happiness of the 
church I have not turned to the right 
or tc the left.. I have not shunned, as 
was said by the eminent apostle Paul, 
to declare the whole counsel as far as 
God in His providence has enabled 
me to do, regardless of the frowns of 
mortal man; for when I arise befcre 
a congregation, and stand as it were 
between the living and the dead, and 
if I am what I profess to be, as a 
mouth for God, and in His immediate 
presence, I do not feel that I have a 
foe to punish or a friend to reward. 
I have ever felt that error should be 
exposed and truth made manifest 
from preaching the word as it is in 
Jesus. Timothy was commanded to 
preach the word, which has ever been 
unpopular with the world cf mankind 
at large, and especially with the relig- 
ious world. I feel that my time is 
short that I am to remain here on 
earth to fight against the enemies of 
truth, but my great desire is that I 
may be found in the discharge of my 
duty, that I may have a conscience 
void of cffence toward God and man, 
that I may, through divine grace, be 
enabled when I lay down in death, to 
say I have fought a good fight." Elder 
Turner served as justice of the peace 
of his native county twenty years, 
also served as school commissioner, 
county assessor, member of the board 
of supervisors, and member of the 
state legislature. In old age he wrote 
in regard to this work. "I am now old 
and most worn out, and I can say that 
a great deal of my labcr and time has 
been given to the public, but I do not 
regret it, nor anything I could do for 



my fellow-man; there is a sphere in 
life for all men to occupy, and he who 
lives alone fcr himself is but little use 
to society." 




Z. T. TURNER. 

Turner, Elder Z. T. of Figsboro Va., 
son of Elder E. B. Turner, was born 
January 20, 1874. Though he was rear- 
ed by christian parents and taught to 
be honest and truthful, and treat all 
people with kindness, yet all the train- 
ing given by men could not kill him to 
the love of sin and the pleasures of the 
world. God's spirit alone could do 
this, and for him, this was done in his 
thirty-third year of age. Being deep- 
ly convicted of sin his burden of guilt 
was heavy, but the same God who be- 
gins the good work, completes it; he 
was given a sweet hope in Jesus as 
his sin-bearer, and a love for the Bap- 
tists with whom he united in 1881 and 
was baptized by Elder Amos Dicker- 
son. Having a dispensation of the 
gospel committed unto him he was 
soon impressed with the duty of 
preaching, and though for sometime 
he was disobedient, yet he could get 
no relief of mind until he went for- 
ward in the public service. He was, 
in 1886, ordained by Elders S. Peter 
Corn. W. S. Minter, W. S. McDowell, 
G. B. Lee and E. B. Turner, and on the 
following day baptized his wife and 
four others, and has since had the care 
of churches, has baptized a great many 
persons into the fellowship of his 
churches, united several hundred cou- 
ples in marriage, is clerk of the Pig 
River Association, and is a faithful, 
zealous minister and desires to be 
found in duty's pathway. Elder Turner 
has been blessed with two good wives ; 



276 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



he was first married to Miss Nannie A. 
Jamison, and after her death thirteen 
years later, he was married to Miss 
Hattie S. Cook, who enters fully unto 
her husband's labors in the Master's 
vineyard. 



CHARLES L. TURNER. 

Turner, Elder Charles L., of Hanni- 
bal, Mo., was born in Albemarle Coun- 
ty. Va., June 30, 1792. He was one of 
the pioneer preachers of Missouri, and 
was in the constitution of Bear Creek 
Church, near Hannibal, which occurred 
August 5, 1821. He was ordained to 
the full work of the ministry Novem- 
ber 19, 1834, and was a strong defender 
of the faith. He died November 21, 
1864. The editor regrets that data for 
a more conplete sketch of this worthy 
minister could not be obtained for this 
work. 



WILLIAM TURNIDGE. 

Turnidge, Elder William, of Missou- 
ri, was a faithful minister of Jesus 
who lived before the division of 1832. 
He died sometime in the fifties and 
was considered a gifted expounder of 
the doctrine of God our Saviour, and 
it is with regret that the editor could 
not secure sufficient information for 
a detailed sketch. 




VINCENT J. TURNIDGE. 

Turnidge, Elder Vincent J., of Sheri- 
dan, Ore., was born in Missouri. He 
was raised by Old School Baptists. 
His father, John Turnidge, was a 



Avorthy minister for many years and 
some of the most pleasant memories 
of Elder Vincent J. Turnidge are the 
recollection of his departed father's 
life and labors as a minister, — his 
praying for God's protection for his 
family singing the songs of Zion, etc. 
But his father's teaching could not 
make a Baptist of him. He grew up 
depending upon his supposed good 
works for salvation, feeling that at 
any time he chose he could perform 
the conditions that would make him a 
child of God. But he was prone to put 
off beginning the good work. When 
about seventeen years old, he entered 
the army and suffered much pro- 
vation. It was while recovering from 
a very low, unconscious condition in a 
hospital that he was made to fully real- 
ize his lost and ruined condition, was 
deeply convicted of sin and felt that 
hell was his portion. But God deliv- 
ered him of this great burden of sin. 
Whi'e praying the publican's prayer 
he was given a sweet hope in Jesus,, 
recovered from his illness, went home 
and in August, 1865, united with Log 
Creek Church and was baptized by 
Elder Isaac Odell. Two years later 
he moved to Lawrence County, Mo., 
and was in the constitution of Stall's 
Creek Church about 1868. Soon after 
this he was by this church ordained to 
the gospel ministry by Elders John 
Turnidge, A. J. Derniel, Wm. Jones 
and George Anderson. In 1874 he 
moved to Polk County, Ore. and was 
one of the constituent members of 
Fellowship Church organized about 
this time, and has served this and 
other churches for about twenty-five 
years. He desires to be found faith- 
ful and to know nothing but Jesus and 
Him crucified in the salvation of sin- 



JAMES TURNIDGE. 

Turnidge, Elder James, .of .Idaho, 
was born in Missouri, licensed to 
preach by Stalls Creek Church in 
Lawrence County, about the year 
1870, moved to Texas sometime after- 
wards and was, in this state, ordained 
by Elders William Price and D. Eth- 
redge. Later he moved to Oregon and 
some years after this moved to Idaho 
and has the care of churches but the 
editor failed to get data for a proper 
sketch. 



JOHN TURNIDGE. 

Turnidge, Elder John (1816-1886), of 
Oregon, was for forty-four years a 
minister of the Old School or Primi- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



277 



tive Baptist Church and boldly and 
fearlessly contended for the faith once 
delivered unto the saints. His labors 
were mostly among the churches in 
Missouri but in the latter part of his 
life he moved to Oregon where he lab- 
ored until his death. He was, in his old 
age, strong in the faith he had preach- 
ed in his youth and died with a sweet 
assurance of salvation in Jesus. 




J. C. TURNIDGE. 

Turnidge, Elder J. C., of Weiser, 
Idaho, son of Elder John Turnidge. 
was born in Ray County, Mo., in 1849, 
convicted of sin in his seventeenth 
year and after much soul sorrow and 
many days of labor under 'Moses he 
was enable by faith to come to Jesus 
for rest, and found a home in the dear 
old church his father sc much loved 
and so earnestly labored for. He was 
soon licensed to preach and about this 
time moved to Texas and was or- 
dained at Orchard Gap Church in Col- 
lins County, by Elders W. N. Price 

and Harris. Some years later 

he moved to Idaho and has since 
served churches in this state and in 
Washington and Oregon. He has as- 
sisted in the organization of churches 
in the Siloam Association, has baptiz- 
ed about one hundred persons, is in 
the sixtieth year of his age and feels 
his race is nearly run, but is faithful 
to the churches of his care, strong in 
the Lord and well established in His 
doctrine and feels that the fiaith he 
has preached to others will sustain 
him in the hour of death. 



G. N. TUSING. 

Tusing, Elder G. N., of Ohio, was 
born in Franklin County, O., Decem- 



ber 6 ,1821, and died May 27, 1905. He 
was united in marriage with Elizabeth 
Harman February 18, 1847, and they 
journeyed together and shared with 
each other the joys and sorrows of 
this life for over 58 years. This union 
was blessed with four sons and tive 
daughters. One brother of the deceas- 
ed, Elder Samuel C. Tusing, of New 
Lexington, O., also survives him. 
There are also thirty grandchildren 
and twenty-three great-grandchildren 
Elder Tusing was baptized and united 
with Friendship Baptist Church at 
Reynoldsburg, O., December 7, 1851. 
He was ordained to the ministry by 
this same church December 10, 1853, 
and he was ccntinuously engaged in 
the ministry for more than fifty-one 
years. It can be said of him that few 
men came nearer than he in gaining 
the universal love and esteem of his 
brethren. He fully appreciated that 
his departure was speedily approach- 
ing and he calmly awaited the final 
summons. He frequently remarked 
that his work was done and that he 
was ready to go. God had blessed him 
through a long life and in the lan- 
guage of the Psalmist, had satisfied 
him. He retained fully his faculties to 
the end, and died as he had lived — 
fully trusting in Jesus. His life was 
useful, his end peaceful, his death 
easy. 



JOHN TYLER. 

Tyler, Elder John of Texas, died 
April 30, 1885. He was a highly es- 
teemed and faithful minister of Jesus 
for about fifty-eight years. Sound in 
doctrine and practice, beloved by all 
of the household of faith that knew 
him, he died in the full triumphs of 
that faith he had so earnestly preached 
to others. The editor regrets that a 
more complete sketch could not ap- 
pear. 



DANIEL TYSON. 

Tyson, Elder Daniel of Georgia, fell 
as'eep in the triumphs of a living faith 
in Jesus October 15, 1895, at his resi- 
dence in Emanuel County, in the sev- 
enty-first year of his age. He was a 
son of Noah and Elizabeth Tyson, of 
Washington County, Ga. Was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Jane Neal 
January 6 1846, with whom he lived 
happily until his death. In 1868 he 
was baptized into the fellowship of 
Sardis Church, Emanuel County, Ga., 
by Elder Archibald Odom, where he 



278 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



remained an orderly and exemplary 
member until his death. Soon after 
he joined the church he was elected 
clerk, and served in that capacity satis- 
factorily until he was ordained in the 
year 1873 as a minister of Christ. The 



Presbytery was composed of Elders 
Archie Odom and Edward Rhyner. He 
proved to be an able minister of the 
gospel of Christ until his death. Was 
well versed in the scriptures and 
sound in doctrine. 



u 



MARTIN URNER. 

Urner, Elder Martin, of Virginia, 
died the 6th day of March, 1888, in the 
seventy-fifth year of his age. No lin- 
gering sigh escaped his breast, no 
longing eye was turned to the tempor- 
al treasures of this life, but with a 
happy smile and conscious to the last 
he bid adieu tc this world and loved 
ones to enjoy a happy fruition in the 
eternity of God. Elder Urner was well 



known by all the churches of the Ke- 
tockton and Ebenezer Associations. 
He had a dignified, Christian deport- 
ment, a smile and warm word for all. 
His sermcns showed thought and de- 
veloped a systematic training of the 
mind. He desired to know nothing in 
his preaching but Jesus and Him 
crucified for the salvation of sinners, 
and nothing but Scripture as a fur- 
nisher to God's people for all good 
wcrks. 



V 




D. M. VAIL. 

Vail, Elder D. M., of Waverly, Pa., 
the son of Daniel S. and Margery E. 
Vail was born September 1, 1845; at- 
tended country school about six 
months a year from about seven to 
fifteen years of age. He had some 
knowledge cf his sinful condition be- 
fore God when only about seven years 
old and for twenty-one years he la- 
bored under the law, and was made 
to know that he was a lost and ruined 
sinner. At about twenty-one years cf 
age he received a hope in God's rich 
mercy and grace; soon after this he 



united with the Old School Baptist 
Church called Cheming, in Cheming 
County, N. Y., Elder S. H. Durand be- 
ing pastor. For some time he was 
very contented and happy,- but socn 
he was very much impressed to de- 
clare in public what wonderful things 
the Lord had done for him, and in 
October, 1878, he was ordained by 
Elders Win. L. Beebe, Gilbert Beebe, 
Balas Bundy and Silas H. Durand. 
Very soon after he was called to serve 
several churches, is still serving some 
cf his first churches, and at present 
has the care of ten churches. He has 
travelled and preached in fifteen 
states and Canada, and is well and 
favorably known. Elder Vail writes: 
"I have never felt that my services 
were of much, if any, benefit to my 
brethren, but I love them, and they 
love me, and that, I feel, more than 
compensate me for my services. I 
have never desired the pastoral care 
of a church, as I have never felt quali- 
fied for the office and it has been with 
great reluctance that I have consent- 
ed. Have never received a stated sal- 
ary, but each member bands me what 
is in their heart to give, and the 
needs of myself and family — have 
raised eight children — have always 
been supplied by their gifts with what 
I have myself earned." Elder Vail is 
one of our most faithful pastors and 
is most highly esteemed wherever he 
goes. 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



279 




MATTHIAS MOUNT VAN CLEAVE. 

Van Cleave, Elder Matthias Mount, 
of Crawfordsville, Ind., was born in 
Shelby County, Ky., November 26, 
1810; moved with his parents to Indi- 
ana in 1824 when the country was al- 
most a wilderness; united with Union 
Church in 1828, and was some years 
afterwards ordained to the minister- 
ial work, and for nearly fifty years 
proved a faithful and devoted minis- 
ter. He died at his home October 2G, 
1898, in his eighty-seventh year of 
age. As a man he was almost univer- 
sally esteemed, and had the commu- 
nity been asked tc select its most 
affectionate, kindest-hearted man, its 
most faithful and devoted believer in 
God, "Uncle Mattie Van Cleave" 
v/ould have been the choice. His life 
was a blessing — his end was peace. 
The church was very dear to him. As 
a nurse cherisheth her children, so did 
he live and labor and pray for the 
welfare of Zion. Elder Van Cleave 
was also an able, comforting writer. 
The following letter written by him 
about two years before his death and 
printed in the Gospel Messenger, I 
feel, will be read with interest 
"Brethren of the South, and of Every 
Land where this may Come — I send 
you Greeting in the Lord: Grace, 
mercy and peace be multiplied tc you. 
What is there to compare with the 
love of Christ Jesus our Lord? It has 
been my support and joy for three- 
score years; I trust it will be my re- 
joicing in the world everlasting. The 
Lord was gocd to me in my youth; 
now he is everything, and in heaven 
he will be all in all. I remember the 
day of youth, when I have often gone 
on foot to the meetings fourteen miles 



away, sometimes walking, sometimes 
running, and feeling that my heart 
was already there. Nc time is so dear 
to memory as that spent in trying to 
serve God; no friends have been so 
dear as my companions in the church. 
It gladdens my heart, Bro. Respess, 
to know that you have been under my 
roof; that we have clasped hands and 
eaten bread together; and so of Bro. 
Hassell, and Bro. Durand, and many 
more of whom the world is not 
worthy. Thank God we are bound to- 
gether in the one hope of our calling. 
One destiny remains for us; one 
eternal rest, where sin and tears will 
have no remembrance. The crossing 
of Jordan is not far distant; ere I 
touch its brim, I would love to record 
the mercy of my God. Have I not, like 
gocd old Jacob, seen the vision of a 
ladder reaching up to heaven? Like 
him I would set up a stone for a pil- 
lar and pour oil upon it for a memo- 
rial to Him who has said, 'Behold I 
am with thee, and will keep thee in 
all places whither thou goest.' But 
who can tell of the Lord's wonderful 
works? I can say with David, If I 
would speak of them, they are more 
than can be numbered. Words are 
weak and language fails. You, whose 
hearts have sometimes been as the 
Lord's banqueting house, have the 
witness wdthin yourselves. You know 
that the God of Jerusalem rideth upon 
the heaven in thy help, and in his 
excellency on the sky. Blessed be the 
Lord, in his name we will set up our 
banners. He has been with us in 
many dark and secret hours, in joys 
and sorrows, in sunshine and storm. 
He has given His people grace; He 
lives to give them glory. Readers cf 
the Messenger that can say with me, 
The time of old age has come, have 
you ever seen the righteous forsaken, 
or his seed begging bread? Have you 
ever found a hope like the good hcpe 
of grace? Have' you ever repented the 
profession you have made? I com- 
mend you to the God of all grace. 
With cne voice let us praise Him for 
the precious things of heaven, for the 
dew, and the deep that coucheth be- 
neath, for the good will of him that 
dwelt in the bush. The Lord's pres- 
ence be with you evermore. A dear 
farewell. — M. M. Van Cleave." 



PERRY VANDEVER. 

Vandever, Elder Perry, of Lola, 111., 
"was born in the state of Indiana in 
1844, and joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church in 1867 and was ordained to 
the work of the ministry in 1885, and is 



280 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



now pastor of four churches." This 
brief notice of Elder Vandever was 
copied from Elder Patten's Souvenir 
book of 1895, and is herein published, 
all efforts of the editor to secure data 
for a more extended notice proved 
fruitless. 




ISAAC NEWTON VAN METER 

Van Meter, Elder Isaac Newton 
(1816-1894), of Illinois. This gifted 
minister of Jesus, was born in Gray- 
son County, Ky., and was, in 1839, 
married to Miss Lucinda Lawson. To 
them were born eleven children. He 
received a hope in Jesus in 1833 united 
with the Primitive Baptists soon after, 
and soon began preaching. After 
spending about twenty years serving 
churches in Kentucky he moved to 
Illinois. He was not long among 
strangers, for he soon found the little 
band of brethren and sisters located at 
Greenbush, in the Spoon River Asso- 
ciation, called New Hope, and com- 
menced preaching for them, putting in 
his letter, and continued the double 
relation of member and pastor to the 
day of his death. He has been promi- 
nent and influential in the meetings of 
the Spoon River Association almost 
from the time of his coming into her 
bounds, either serving as clerk or 
Moderator, and invariably giving the 
best of satisfaction in either capacity. 
As a man and a christian I think it can 
truthfully be said that he was as near 
as it is possible for man to be; vigi- 
lant, sober, of good behavior, given to 
hospitality, apt to teach, not given 



to wine no striker, not greedy of filthy 
lucre, but patient, not a brawler, not 
covetous, one that ruled his own 
house well, having his children in sub- 
jection, with all gravity. As a pastor 
his undivided time was given to the 
work, and but very few were the times 
that his churches were disappointed 
by a failure on his part. His gift In 
preaching and expounding the script- 
ures covered the entire range of the 
gospel, including doctrine, christian 
experience and practical godliness, 
often closing his solemn sermon with 
an impressive exhortation to his 
brethren and sisters in Christ to walk 
worthy of the vocation wherewith they 
were called. As a writer his corre- 
spondence and communications pub- 
lished in the Signs of the Times and 
other Baptist periodicals, and read 
throughout the United States and 
Canada, as well as his book called 
"Walks About Zion," and also his 
Pocket Hymns, all attest the high or- 
der of his ability in the field of litera- 
ture. His experience in verse writ- 
ten by himself is so full of the Spirit's 
teaching that it is herewith appended: 

"In eighteen hundred thirty-three, 
It pleased the Lord to let me see 
The dangerous state that I was in, 
All covered with a cloak of sin. 

He taught me first that I was blind 
And always was to sin inclined, 
Also that I had always stood, 
Opposed to God and what was good. 

I then was filled with many fears, 
For I have spent full eighteen years 
In sin and folly, and could see 
No way for my recovery. 

I viewed the terror of the Lord 
And thought that he my soul abhorred; 
He seemed to frown me from his face 
And say: 'With me you have no place.' 

I thought while in this state of mind, 
I was the worst of all mankind, 
I would have changed my doleful case 
With any one of Adam's race. 

I viewed the Christian's happy state, 
With a desire to be his mate; 
Yet felt ashamed to show my face, 
And rather sought some secret place. 

I felt like I was one alone, 
That like me surely there was none; 
No friend on earth nor yet in heaven, 
Nor hope that I should be forgiven. 

But wondrous and almighty grace! 
The Lord unveiled his smiling face 
And had me come to Him and live 
And said, 'I freely all forgive.' 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



281 



It was August, the last day, 
That he removed ray guilt away, 
And spoke with such a charming voice, 
That all within me did rejoice. 

His glorious face I did behold, 
With such a joy as can't be told; 
The whole creation seemed to be 
Praising the Lord in harmony. 

Oh, Wondrous love, amazing grace! 
1 never shall forget the place 
Where God revealed his love to me 
And set my soul at liberty. 

What is this world with all its fame, 
Compared with Jesus' precious name! 
What are its vain and transient toys, 
Compared with God's eternal joys! 

O Lord, since thou hast been so kind 
And gracious as to change my mind, 
Since thou hast been so good to me, 
May I forsake the world for thee! 



WILEY A. VIA. 

Via, Elder Wiley A. (1843-1902), of 
Virginia, was born in Franklin Coun- 



ty, and after a useful life died in the 
same county. He joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church called Long Branch, 
in 1865, and was baptized by Elder 
T. L. Roberson. He was chosen dea- 
con in 1870 and licensed to preach in 
1873, and was the following year, or- 
dained by Elders G. L, Tuggle, I. L. 
Robinson, W. R. Radford and Asa D. 
Short. In 1878 he was elected clerk cf 
Smith's River Association and served 
as clerk until his death, was a good 
man, a comforting preacher anu ad- 
mired for the Christian virtues he 
possessed. He had a noble heart and 
was much given to hospitality. At the 
time of his death he was serving two 
churches. He alsc proved to be a 
faithful soldier in the war between 
the states, and remained in the army 
till the surrender. He also served his 
county as a constable, commissioner 
of the revenue, land assessor and 
school trustee. Much more could be 
said concerning this good man, but 
all that we could say would add noth- 
ing in the minds of those who were 
acquainted with him. 



w 




ISAIAH WAGGONER. 

Waggoner, Elder Isaiah, of Clarks, 
Neb., "was born in Moultrie County, 
111., August 17, 1835, united with Linn 
Creek Church in March, 18G3, and 
moving to Missouri, was licensed to 
preach in Liberty Church, Linn Coun- 



ty, Mo., in 1871, and was ordained in 
Blue River Church, Saline County, 
Mo., May 10, 1873. He now has a mem- 
bership with the Baptists in Nebras- 
ka, where he lives." Efforts to secure 
ftirther data proved fruitless. 



JAMES WAGENER. 

Wagener, Elder James, of Dechard, 
Tenn., "was born in Franklin County, 
Tenn., December 25, 1821; convicted 
cf sin in his nineteenth year and after 
deep conviction was given a hope in 
the perfect work of Jesus, but linger- 
ed outside the church in the neglect 
of duty for about fourteen years. In 
1854 he united with Old Macedonia 
Church and was baptized by Elder 
John P. Walker. The following year 
he was crdained by Elders Elijah 
Turner, I. E. Douthit and Richard 
Fain." Further information of Elder 
Wagener's life and labors could not 
be obtained. 



THOMAS B. WALDRIP. 

Waldrip, Elder Thomas B., of Miss- 
issippi, died at his home in Lafayette 
County. November IS, 1889. He was 



282 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



born June 15, 1848 and married to 
Blanche H. Woolen, December 16, 1869, 
Elder Waldrip was in many respects a 
very remarkable man. He had few of 
the opportunities that his native abil- 
ity entitled him to, but by earnest and 
persistent effort he acquired such a 
degree of intelligence, and gained the 
confidence of the people to such a de- 
gree that they required him to serve 
three terms as magistrate, and then 
sent him two consecutive terms to the 
legislature, and probably would have 
continued him longer in that or some 
other positions but he declined, say- 
ing: "I have delayed long enough, I 
must get about my Master's busi- 
ness." Brother Waldrip was received 
into the church and baptized Novem- 
ber, 1880, licensed in the spring of 
1884, but was opposed to being or- 
dained and stoutly refused to submit 
until the church demanded that he 
should be set apart to the ministry, 
wh'ch was done in September, 1888, 
which position he filled to the great 
satisfaction of his brethren and sis- 
ters for only a little over one year. 
This reminds us that the way of the 
Lord is past finding out. 



E. W. WALKER. 

Walker, Elder E. W. (1836-1901), of 

Tennessee, was born in Warren 
County, Tenn , and was married to 
Miss Mary Mead, of Lincoln County, 
Tenn., 1867. He had an impressive ex- 
perience of grace while at school, but 
did not join the church till after the 
Civil war cf the sixties in which he 
performed an important and faithful 
part on the Confederate side. His first 
union with the church was at Con- 
cord, which he joined in December, 
18G7, and was baptized by Elder Jno. 
E. Frost. He was one of the seventeen 
members who organized the church 
at Buckeye in 1871, and was abcut 
this time -ordained to the ministry. 
Thence to the day of his death, with 
a short interval, he was pastor of that 
church. Elder Walker was great in all 
the attributes of character that en- 
noble a citizen of this world. But 
greater in devotion to the welfare cf 
spiritual Israel, the Zion of the Lord, 
and the doctrinal truths that distin- 
guished her from the religious socie- 
ties of the world. Few of the servants 
of the Lord had a deeper insight into 
the fundamental doctrines of Christ 
than he. He gave strict heed to Paul's 
injunction to Timothy, "Give attend- 
ance to reading, to exhortation, to 



doctrine." Great doctrinal truths en- 
gaged his mind with eager interest, 
and yet he often dwelt on the import- 
ance of exhortation, and exhorted to 
the performance of the practical 
duties of church membership and the 
duties of ordinary citizenship. 




J. N. WALLACE. 

Wallace, Elder J. N., of Providence, 

Ky., was born in Henry County, 
Tenn, November 8, 1862; raised by 
Primitive Baptist parents, received a 
hope in Jesus in his twelfth year, 
united with Union Church at the age 
of nineteen and baptized by Elder J. 
G. Webb. Two years later he began 
preaching, and was in April, 1883 or- 
dained to the full work of the minis- 
try since which time he has had the 
care of four churches almost contin- 
uously and has traveled and preached 
in several states. He now serves 
Union, Stcney Point, Flat Creek, and 
the church at Providence, where he 
now resides. In 1884 he was married 
to Miss Annie Gibson, is highly es- 
teemed by his brethren and faithful 
in the discharge of his duties as a 
servant in the Master's vineyard. For 
some years he has served as modera- 
tor of the Highland Association of 
Regular Baptists. 



THOMAS N. WALTON. 

Walton, Elder Thomas N., of Dan- 
ville, Va., was born on top of the 
White Oak Mountains in Pittsylvania 
County, Va., in 1853'. From the time 
he was about four years of age until 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



283 



nineteen tie had distressing thoughts 
of death. But in his nineteenth year 
God convicted him of sin and after 
much distress of mind and vain ef- 
forts to satisfy the law was brought to 
the footstool of mercy and found 
Christ the sinners' friend as his advo- 
cate with the Father. He united with 
Mt. Arrarat Church in 1874 and was 




THOMAS N. WALTON 

baptized by Elder J. S. Dameron. His 
gift was scon discovered by the 
church, and he was, in 1880 ordained 
by Elders W. S. McDowell and W. S. 
Minter. Since then he has had the 
care of churches and has traveled and 
preached considerably among his 
brethren and is held in high esteem. 
For about twenty years he has been 
the beloved moderator of the Staun- 
ton River Association. 



JAMES M. WARD. 

Ward, Elder James M. of Illinois, was 
born in Mason county, W. Va., No- 
vember 15, 1813. His mother died 
when he was but a small child and 
his father when he was eight years 
old. He lived in Virginia until he was 
fourteen years old and went from 
there to Illinois, residing there until 
he enlisted in the Black Hawk war in 
1832, serving his time and re-enlist- 
ing. Soon after that war he went to 
Dubuque, Iowa. In the year 1855 he 
moved to Missouri, locating in Harri- 
son County; he lived there ten years 
and then moved to Davies County, 
where he lived until his death. In 
1841 he united with the Old School 
Predestinarian Baptist Church, was 
licensed to preach by this church in 



1853, and was ordained to preach in 
the year 1SGG. He has served Sugar 
Creek Church in Davies County for 
almost fifty years. He died February 
6, 1905, at the age of ninety-one. He 
is survived by a wife and nine chil- 
dren, twenty-four grandchildren and 
eighteen great-grandchildren. The 
daily life of Elder Ward was such as 
to win for him the respect and esteem 
of all classes: his memory will be re- 
vered by many, his kind deeds and 
worthy acts cherished, and his noble 
life will long be an inspiration to 
those with whom he came in contact. 




B. R. WARREN. 

Warren, Elder B. R., .of .Bentley, 
111., "was born in Bourbon County, Ky., 
January 10, 1816. He united with 
Todd's Creek Church, Piatt County, 
Missouri, and was ordained in Clear 
Creek Church, near Kearney, Mo., on 
the second Saturday in August, 1850, 
and has since served as pastor of 
churches. His faith is strong in salva- 
tion by grace, and he awaits in hope 
his release from this world." This 
brief sketch is from Elder Cash's 
book of 1896, and further information 
could not be secured. 



WILLIAM WARREN. 

Warren, Elder William, of Kearney, 
Mo., was born in Bourbon County, 
Ky., May 14, -822, and moving to Mis- 
souri united with Clear Creek Church 



284 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



of Primitive Baptists in July, 1847. He 
was ordained in August, 1865. In his 
old age he still loves the doctrine of 
grace. Detail information relative to 
his labors could not be obtained. 



PLUMMER WATERS. 

Waters, Elder Plummer (1787-1865), 
of Maryland. This able, faithful and 
greatly beloved minister was in the 
service of churches in his native state 
for nearly half a century. Early in 
life he was made to feel the exceeding 
sinfulness of sin, was given a view of 
Jesus as his sin bearer, united with 
the Old School Baptists and was bap- 
tized by Elder William Wilson. Elder 
Waters was noted for his faithfulness, 
his zeal in, and love for, the cause of 
truth, given to hospitality and kindly 
disposed he was greatly loved by 
those who best knew him, and wield- 
ed a great influence for good in his 
community. 




CHAS. H. WATERS, (M. D.) 

Waters, Elder Chas. H., of Wash- 
ington, D. C. This good natured, 
cheerful and hospitable man, gifted 
preacher, able writer and teacher and 
successful physician, was born of 
Samuel and Mary Waters in Hancock 
County, Md., July 1, 1849. The early 
years of his life were spent in teach- 
ing. From the school room as teacher 
he went to college as a medical stu- 
dent, graduated in medicine at the 
University of Maryland in 1871, began 
the practice of his profession in Mont- 
gomery County, Md., and was the 



same year married to Miss Ella Yates, 
a daughter of Elder P. W. Yates. The 
following year — 1872 — he and his wife 
united with Columbia Church and 
were baptized by Elder Yates. The 
gift to the church in Bro. Waters was 
soon discovered, he began preaching 
in 1878, and in 1880, was ordained by 
Elders P. W. Yates and L. B. Wynne. 
Having a large family and wishing to 
educate them well he established, in 
1886, the "Fairview Seminary," a 
school of high reputation and moral 
standing, in which many Baptist girls 
as well as girls not of Baptist persua- 
sion, were educated. Among the girls 
from our own people as patrons of 
this high-class and popular school 
might be mentioned the daughters of 
Elders J. J. Gilbert of Kentucky, J. H. 
Purefoy of Alabama, M. T. Lawrence 
of North Carolina, T. N. Alderton of 
West Virginia, and T. S. Dalton of 
Virginia. The work of this seminary 
was terminated after eighteen years 
of usefulness when the furniture and 
building were destroyed by fire. At 
present Dr. Waters is practicing med- 
icine in Washington City and has the 
pastoral care of the Washington City 
Church, and the Seneca and Columbia 
Churches in Maryland. He is also 
editor of Zion's Advocate. His life is 
a busy and useful one, and he is 
greatly loved for his faithfulness to 
the cause of truth, his liberality to the 
poor and for his kind, cheerful and 
sympathetic nature. 




JOHN H. WATSON (M. D.) 

Watson, Elder John M. (1798-1866). 
was eminent as a minister, writer and 
physician. He was a man of liberal 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



285 



education, of great moral worth, of 
deep piety, of extensive influence, and 
of profound research. Such was his 
conscientious feelings in regard to 
Christian duty, and such his continual 
watchfulness in reference to his con- 
duct, that from the time of his union 
with the church to the day of his 
death, a period of at least forty years, 
not a blot or stain has been known to 
attach to his character as a Christian. 
He was the son of Peter and Eliza- 
beth Watson; was born in Rocking- 
ham County, N. C; at the age of ten 
moved with his widowed mother to 
Williamson County, Tenn, where he 
attended the public schools, and in a 
few years was placed in the office of 
Dr. Housack of New York City. In duo 
time he graduated from the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
York, returned home with honors and 
was the recipient of many other hon- 
ors at the hands of his home people. 
These honors were too much for him. 
He took to drink, and was thrown. He 
arose, but drank on and was again 
thrown, became a common drunkard 
—had delirium tremens, recovered, 
and drank again, and was again 
thrown., and became a poor, shivering 
inebriate. But God took his feet from 
the mire and clay and established his 
goings. He was reclaimed by Divine 
grace, from the paths of vice and 
ruin, experienced a deep sense of ob- 
ligation which he was under to the 
Almighty; received a hope in Jesus 
for the pardon of sin, "conferred not 
with flesh and blood," but immediate- 
ly went forth in the direction of 
Christian duty. After a prayerful and 
diligent study of the holy Scriptures, 
he to the astonishment of his many 
friends, united with the Primitive or 
Old School Baptists at Wilson's Creek 
Church in Williamson County, Tenn., 
believing that these people held the 
pure doctrine of faith "once delivered 
to the saints," together with the prim- 
itive order of Christianity. He was 
soon after ordained to the ministerial 
work. He preached his first sermon 
from the text, "The Scripture," — his 
second from, "Thus saith the Lord," 
and from that moment until he was 
no longer able to stand in the pulpit, 
he preached the gospel of Christ, and 
became the leading minister of the 
old order of Baptists in Tennessee. 
Dr. Watson was also famous in other 
lines. As a physician and surgeon he 
had no equal in the state. As a teach- 
er of his specialty in the University of 
Nashville he had no equal in our 
country. In his lectures he never 



strove to be eloquent, but clear, com- 
pact and fcrceful, and every student 
pronounced him at once a master 
teacher. As a writer he was precise, 
painstaking, clear and fluent. His con- 
tributions to the Nashville Journal of 
Medicine yielded extracts to the 
standards of systematic medicine, and 
his religious writings, especially the 
"Old Baptist Test" — a book that has 
passed through two editions, — show 
the deep spiritual nature, the loving 
heart and the strong and trained mind 
of the writer. And there could not be 
found, perhaps, a more liberal man 
than Dr. Watson. His liberality was 
the subject of discussion among his 
neighbors after his death and it was 
agreed by his neighbors that he had 
given away in absolute dollars, an 
amount exceeding one hundred thou- 
sand. To the poor he was the kindest 
of men. Only in eternity will it be 
known what he did for them. Just be- 
fore his death he wrote: "My physi- 
cians are doubtful of my recovery.* * 
Now, I may say, apparently in the 
shadow of death, I have no recanta- 
tions to make about the doctrine for 
which I have so long contended, and 
trust that it will stand the test of 
death. My prayer is, that I may die 
with this blessed doctrine as much 
impressed upon my heart, as it was 
while trying to preach it. O! Lord, let 
the pulpit and the death-bed be the 
same to me in that respect." And so it 
was. In the full triumphs of faith he 
crossed the river cf death, his last 
words being, — "I am going in peace." 



C. M. WEAVER. 

Weaver, Elder C. M., of Ewing, III. 
The editor failing to secure data of a 
more recent date from which to pre- 
pare a notice of Elder Weaver, quotes 
the following from EMer Potter's book 
of 1895. "He was born in Jackson 
County, III., on the fifteenth day of 
February, 1867, and joined the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in 1S88, and was 
ordained to the work of the ministry 
in 1892, and is now the pastor of three 
churches." 



THOMAS WEAVER. 

Weaver, Elder Thomas of Fountain 
City, Tenn., at present and for thir- 
teen years past, the beloved modera- 
tor of Powell's Valley Association and 
associate editor of the Primitive Bap- 
tist, was born in Campbell County, 



286 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



Term.. May 23, 1845, received a hope 
in Jesus in his twenty-third year of 
age and one year later united with the 
Primitive Baptists at Mossy Springs 
Church in Union County, and was bap- 
tized by Elder Wm. Bridges. He was 
soon licensed to preach and in 1871 
was ordained by Elders Wm. Williams 
and William Bridges, since which 
time he has continuously had the care 
of churches and is at present serving 




THOMAS WEAVER 

three. Elder Weaver has, during his 
thirty-eight years of service in the 
Master's vineyard baptized many be- 
lievers into the fellowship of the 
church, served in the constitution of 
several churches, assisted in the ordi- 
nation of many deacons and elders and 
has traveled and preached among the 
Baptists in several states. He is a 
worthy and highly esteemed minister. 



J. G. WEBB. 

Webb, Elder J. G., of Tioga, Texas, 
This fearless, bold and self-sacrificing 
minister and editor was born in West 
Tennessee, March 9, 1849. Joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church in 1874; was 
ordained in 1878; has served from one 
to five churches since his ordination; 
has baptized about six hundred per- 
sons; assisted in the constitution of 
many churches and in the ordination 
of quite a number of ministers and 
deacons and has married a great many 
people; has traveled a great deal; 
preached in about ten states and two 
territories; engaged in about thirty 
religious discussions and has been en- 
gaged in the publication of the Bap- 
tist Trumpet for fifteen years. He has 



never belonged to any society or or- 
ganization in life except the church; 
has always opposed members of the 
church affiliating with secret orders 
and the use of instrumental music in 
the church as a part of worship and 
has always been outspoken in his re- 
ligious views. He is now serving 
three churches, his home church num- 
bering about one hundred and thirty, 
has never had a doctrinal difference 
among his churches and has been 
greatly blessed in his labors as pastor. 
The Lord has also blessed him with 
unusual good health through life, with 




J. G. WEBB 

a true and loyal companion and six de- 
voted children. His time and his tal- 
ent have been given freely to the serv- 
ice of the Baptists in the cause of God 
and truth and now as he nears the end 
of his race he has no regrets. Though 
worldly advantages have been neg- 
lected and he is what is called a poor 
man yet no charge has ever been pre- 
ferred against him and such a good 
name is rather to be chosen than 
great riches. He says: "The Baptists 
have been good to me, and I hope to 
die in their fellowship." How much 
better it is to be able to choose to suf- 
fer affliction with the people than to 
enjoy the pleasure of sin for a season. 



T. L. WEBB. 

Webb, Elder T. L., of Ingram, Tex., 
the son of Elder J. G. Webb of Tioga, 
Tex., was born in Tennessee, January 
15, 1S74; received a hope in Christ at 
the age of fifteen, united with the 
Primitive Baptists at Harmony 
Church in Fannin Ccunty, Tex., July, 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



287 



1900, was baptized by Elder J. W. 
Herriage, and ordained to the work 
of the ministry April 26, 1902, by the 
following presbytery: Elders J. W. 
Herriage, J. G. W>ebb, J. W. Segler, R. 
C. Taylor, M. L. Barrett, P. D. Aus- 
mus and Willie L. Barrett. He is one 
of the editors of the Baptist Trumpet, 




T. L. WEBB 

published at Tioga, Tex., with which 
he has been connected for many 
years. Elder W.ebb is a fluent writer, 
convincing speaker and an able de 
fender of the cause of Jesus. His ser- 
vices are being blessed to the comfort 
of many of God's children. 



DANIEL SMITH WEBB. 

Webb, Elder Daniel Smith, of Hills- 
ville, Va., son of Elder Isaac and Ma- 
lesia Jane Webb, was born in Carroll 
County, Va., March 5, 1855. The sec- 
ond Sunday morning in June, 1867, he 
was riding along horseback thinking 
that some day he would be a rich 
man, and at a very old age would get 
religion. Suddenly a very dark object 
appeared coming directly at him, with 
a glittering sharp point in front of it, 
and like lightning it thrust through 
him and a voice said, "Already too 
late." He began to pray, was deeply 
convicted of sin and for Ave years 
lamented his condition, and sought 
the mercy of God, in tears and with 
groanings which cannot be uttered 
One night in June, 1872, while on his 
bed death seized him. He tried to call 
his father but could not speak, and 
felt doomed to the dark pit of destruc- 
tion. With his last breath he prayed, 
"Lord, save me." He heard the sweet- 



est sound of music and looking up 
saw a white cord letting down from 
heaven and a bud on the end just 
ready to open. The bud entered into 
his bosom and took him out of the 
world. He saw the world a black ball 
and God fanned it out of existence 
with one fan of his hand. He then 
said, "Surely, God can be just and 
forgive sins for He with one fan of 
his hand can blot this earth out, and 
now, O Lord, may I return to my 
body, tnat I may tell to others what 
a dear Saviour I have found." In this 
vision he returned to his body and 
felt free from sin and that he would 
never have any more sorrow. In Sep- 
tember, 1873, he married Miss Mary 
Ellen Edwards, a God-given compan- 
ion, and in 1875 both joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church. One night 
he dreamed he was under a white 
cloud and a white hand and arm put 
through and the neck of a phial pro- 
truded out of the palm of the hand 
and annointed him to go and preach, 
and his wife dreamed the same thing. 
Later he dreamed of preaching and 
baptizing the young and old, the rich 
and poor and hearing the Lord's peo- 
ple shouting, and his wife dreamed 
the same thing at the same time. 
Again he dreamed that ten elders met 
at Harmony Church and ordained him 
to preach, and said, "Go, and as you 
go, preach." And he sprang out of bed 
and exclaimed, "Lord, I'll go," and his 
wife saw the same vision and told it 
to him. Confirmed cf the heavenly 
calling, he began preaching in 1886, 
was ordained in 1887, by the same ten 
elders that he and his wife saw in the 
dream four years before. He has often 
times been warned in dreams of dan- 
gers coming to the church, and many 
times has dreamed of ingatherings at 
certain churches, and of certain noble 
people joining, and has lived to see 
these dreams fulfilled. Elder Webb's 
service in the ministry has been bless- 
ed of the Lord. He has baptized about 
seven hundred persons into the fellow- 
ship of the Baptist Church and in the 
evening of life writes: "Faith in God 
is my only staff, hope in Christ my 
greatest riches and the fellowship cf 
the brethren my sweetest pleasure." 
His good wife died February 6, 1908, 
leaving himself, eight sons and three 
daughters as sorrowing members of 
the broken family. 



ISAAC WEBB. 

Webb, Elder Isaac, of Hillsville, Va. 
This gifted and useful man is the sixth 
son of John and Hannah Webb and 



288 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



was born in Grayson County, Va., No- 
vember 26, 1833. Was taugbt by his 
mother, who Avas a member of the Bap- 
tist Church before his birth, to read 
the Bible, at the tender age of seven, 
and he has read it through ten times 
since, and is fully established in its 
teachings. When a little boy eight 
years of age, he dreamed of seeing and 
conversing with Jesus, and from time 
to time afterward was taught in 
visions and dreams to view his lost 
condition, his salvation in Jesus, his 




ISAAC WEBB 

duty toward the church and his call to 
the ministry, but was for a long time 
disobedient. In his eighteenth year he 
was married to Miss Melissa J. Martin 
and their children, grand children and 
great grand children and their families 
now number about one hundred and 
sixty-five. He and his wife united 
with Fellowship Church in 1857. In 
1865 on his return from the war, where 
he voluntarily went to keep from 
preaching, he was licensed, and three 
years later was ordained to the minis- 
terial work. Elder Webb has contin- 
ually since his ordination, had the care 
of churches and is at present pastor 
of four, and Moderator of the New 
River Association. He has been in the 
ministry about forty-three years and 
during this period has traveled many 
miles preaching the gospel of Christ, 
has baptized many persons, married 
many couples and is highly esteemed 
among his people. He has also, in his 
past busy life, taught twenty-five 
schools, served twelve years as county 
treasurer, fifteen years as military offi- 
cer, two terms in the legislature and 
judge under part of two legislative ap- 
pointments. He and his faithful wife 
have lived to see all their children but 



one, with their companions and sev- 
eral grand children, members of the 
Primitive Baptist Church. Their faith- 
ful labors have been blessed. God is 
still their refuge and though growing 
feeble in body they are strong in the 
Lord and are waiting the summons, 
"Child, your Father calls, come home." 




Q. D. WEEKS. 

Weeks, Elder Q. D., of Willis, Va., 
was born October 31, 1852, married to 
Miss Eliza E. Hylton in 1874, convicted 
of sin and given a hope in Jesus and 
united with the Primitive Baptists at 
West Fork Church, Floyd County, Va., 
began preaching in 1880 and was four 
years later ordained to the gospel 
work. He has served as pastor of the 
following churches, West Fork, twenty- 
two years, Indiana Creek, fourteen 
years, Panther's Creek, twelve years, 
Greasy Creek and Corners ten years, 
and was baptized into the fellowship 
of his churches about one hundred 
and sixty persons. He is at present, 
and has been for several years 
past, clerk of the Swiss River Associa- 
tion, and his desire is to honor God 
and be of service to his people. He 
prefers his brethren before himself 
and is greatly loved by them. 



JOHN WELSH. 

Welsh, Elder John, of Maryland, 
was one of the pioneer Baptist 
preachers in the early part of the 
eighteenth century. He united with 
the Baptists long before the division 
and was baptized by Elder Louis 
Richards. For a long time he served 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



289 



as pastor of Hammond's Branch 
Church in Howards County, and oth- 
er churches in Maryland, and was 
considered an able and faithful min- 
ister. 

I. A. WETHERINGTON. 

Wetherington, Eider I. A., of Lake 
Park, Ga., is the faithful and beloved 
moderator of Union Association of 
Old Line Primitive Baptists, and has 
the care of Antioch, Olive Leaf, Unity 
and Wayfare churches. Elder Weth- 
erington is an able minister of the 
New Testament and desires to take 
nothing from, or add to, this blessed 
book, in doctrine or practice. 



V. D. WHATLEY. 

Whatley, Elder V. D. (1809-1866), of 
Georgia, was the son of Robert What- 
ley, a native Georgian. He was born 
in Green County, and fourteen years 
thereafter the family moved to Monroe 
County, Ga., but in common with many 
children of that day, had no opportun- 
ities of school education, except two 
or three months. Being, however, a 
youth of promise, and a brilliant intel- 
lect, good morals and untiring energy 
and industry, he utilized his limited 
opportunities so well that in after 
years his education, information and 
general, knowledge of men and things 
was far above an average of many of 
his young associates; and when at the 
age of eighteen or twenty, he became 
deeply concerned about his soul's sal- 
vation, and carefully read the Bible, 
he greatly and rapidly improved in 
reading, and to the end of his mortal 
pilgrimage on earth, tne Bible was the 
book of books with him. His convic- 
tions for sin were deep and pungent, 
but after many days and nights of 
mourning, supplications and prayers, 
he obtained mercy at about the age of 
twenty-one, and in 1831, he was re- 
ceived into the fellowship of the Bap- 
tist Church at County Line, Pike 
County, Ga., He had become convers- 
ant with the scriptures and learned 
discipline and gospel order so that his 
views and advice were often valuable 
to his brethren in all cases of church 
troubles, even before he had com- 
menced preaching. His general Chris- 
tian character, his deep concern for 
the church of God, and the fruitfulness 
of his mind in spiritual things had 
long impressed the minds of his 
brethren that God had called him 
to the work of the ministry. In 
a few years, his gift was appar- 
ent to the church, and after preach- 



ing for a time to the satisfaction and 
comfort of Christians, his ordination 
was called for, and July 9, 1852, a pres- 
bytery consisting of Elders Josephus 
Barrow, Emanuel Brittain, Moses 
Gunn and James Mayfield, convened 
with the church at Beulah, Troup 
County, Ga., of which Brother Whatly 
was then a member and after careful 
examination in the usual manner, sol- 
emnly set him to go forth and preach 
the gospel and officiate in all the func- 
tions of the gospel ministry "wherever 
God in Providence should cast his lot." 
He faithfully served many churches 
during his ministry and for some years 
before his death by unanimous choice 
of the Beulah Association, he served 
that body as Moderator. In the "Trib- 
ute of Respect," written by his friend 
and neighbor, Dr. John B. Goss, a 
Missionary Baptist, I find the follow- 
ing: "When his brethren and friends 
visited him during his sickness he 
seemed revived, and to the utmost of 
his strength would pour forth his soul 
in thanksgiving to his heavenly Father 
for the grace that had been given him." 
* * "He seemed to be satisfied that 
he had discharged his duty as a min- 
ister to the best of his ability, and 
felt that "he had declared the whole 
counsel of God, with one exception, 
and that was the duty of churches to 
their minister. He regretted that he 
had neglected even that, for he ex- 
pressed himself fully convinced that it 
wps as much the duty of the minister 
to instruct the church in that obliga- 
tion as in any other cardinal point of 
the gospel." Elder Whatley was truly 
a great and good man, an able, faithful 
and useful minister of the gospel. And 
though he did not have as great a var- 
iety in his preaching as some are fav- 
ored with, he always had the respect- 
ful attention of his congregations, 
even where he preached for many 
years. In preaching his whole soul 
seemed to become fired with earnest 
zeal. He was meek and humble man- 
ly, grave and dignified in his address, 
never condescending to indulge in low 
slang or to tell carnal anecdotes, 
whether in the pulpit or out of it. It 
was often said of him that he was 
"always preaching," by his good Chris- 
tian and ministerial deportment at 
home and abroad, in the pulpit or out 
of it. And his very appearance was 
calculated to strike one with reverence 
for him as a man of God. 

A. B. WHATLEY. 

Whatley, Elder A. B., of Greenville, 
Ga. This able and zealous brother was 
born September 24, 1847, in Talapoosa 



290 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



County, Ala. The following fall his 
father moved with his family and set- 
tled in Troup County, Ga., where he 
was reared to manhood. His father — 
Vachel D. Whatley — was a devout 
Christian, a strict member of the 
Primitive Baptist Church and an able 
minister of the gospel. None in his 
day stood higher in the love and fel- 
lowship of the dear old Baptists than 
he did, and his son has followed in 
the footsteps of his honored father. 
His mother — Mrs. Mary B.Phillip — was 
a great and good woman serving the 
Lord and dying in His love. In July, 
1867, if not deceived, Elder Whatley 
obtained a precious hope in God 




A. B. WHATLEY 

through the Lord Jesus Christ. The 
following September he was received 
and baptized into the fellowship cf 
Beulah Church, Troup County, Ga. In 
the year 18GS he was ordained to the 
office of deacon. During the year 1869 
he commenced preaching and was or- 
dained to all the functions of the 
gospel ministry November 18, 1870. 
Since his ordination he has served 
four churches each year with the ex- 
ception of two or three years; has 
baptized a great many, aided in the 
ordination cf a number of elders and 
deacons and helped to constitute two 
churches. He is now in his sixty-sec- 
ond year of age as a man, forty-sec- 
ond as a believer in Christ, and 
thirty-ninth as an ordained minister, 
and feels his race is nearly run, but 
desires to be found laboring in the 
Master's vineyard and to prove his 
faith by his works that he might end 
his course with joy. 



WM. J. WHEELER. 

Wheeler, Elder Wm. J., of Salem, 
111., was born February 21, 1835, in 
Princeton, Gibson County, Ind. He re- 
mained there until he was twelve 
years old, when he moved with his 
father (Dr. John Wheeler) to Wayne 
County, 111., where he remained until 
he was seventeen years old, when he 
moved to Sangamon County, 111. In 
1856 he was married to Miss Harriet 
Sanders, and to them were born 
eleven children. Elder Wheeler joined 
the church of Christ called Horse 
Creek, in July, 1855, was ordained to 
the full work of the gospel ministry 
June 20, 1874, and was truly a good 
man and an able minister. He was a 
gifted singer, and altogether one 
of the most useful preachers in Illi- 
nois. Many of the true saints will long 
remember his sweet scngs of Zion, 
and his clear, soft voice as he preach- 
ed Christ Jesus the only way of life 
eternal. But that voice is now still in 
death, nevermore to sound a warning 
note of the enemy, nor encourage the 
saints here on earth, but awaits the 
second coming of our blessed Redeem- 
er, when he with all the blood-bought 
millions will awake to sing the song 
of Moses and the Lamb with immortal 
tongues forever and ever. 



JAMES W. WHEELER. 

Wheeler, Elder James W., of Caney, 
Ky.,, has the care of churches within 
the bounds of the Burning Spring As- 
sociation of Regular Old School Bap- 
tists and is the beloved moderator 
of his body. Farther information 
could not be obtained. 



J. S. WHITE. 

White, Elder J. S. (1813-1884), cf 
Texas, was born in the state of S. C-, 
Union district, moved to Georgia and 
in his twenty-ninth year, united with 
the church in Dade County, and was 
baptized by Elder Samuel McBee. He 
was ordained to the ministry about 
two years later and earnestly con- 
tended for the faith throughout his 
ministerial life of about forty years. 
Elder White moved to the state of 
Texas, in the year 1859, where he was 
exposed to the savages, and many 
hardships, but he was always found 
discharging his duty to God, and will 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



291 



long be remembered fcr his earnest 
defense of the truth, his orderly walk 
and godly conversation, and for his 
brotherly kindness and charity. 



ELIJAH VIERS WHITE. 

White, Elder Elijah Viers, of Lees- 
burg, Va. This eminent minister and 
gallant leader was born in Montgom- 
ery Ccunty, Md., near Poolesville, on 
August 29, 1832. His education was 
obtained at Lima Seminary, Livings- 
ton County, N. Y., and at Granville 
College, O. During the Kansas trou- 
bles, in 1855, he went to that territory 
and joining a company from Missouri 
tcok an active part in the campaign. 
He afterward returned to Maryland 
and in 1857 moved to Loudon Coun- 
ty, Va. He was baptized April 15, 
186G, by Elder Joseph Furr, ordained 
the third Sunday in August, 1877, and 
at the death of Elder Furr was made 
pastor of New Valley, Mill Creek and 
Frying Pan, (Va.) churches, and served 
these churches faithfully through heat 
and cold, sunshine and rain until his 
death. As a soldier Col. White served 
with conspicuous gallantry through- 
out the Civil war. Starting as a cor- 
poral, he rose by his daring and abil- 
ity to commander cf a battalion of 
the Thirty-fifth Virginia Cavalry. At 
the battle of Balls Bluff near Less- 
burg, October, 1861, he rendered great 
service and was promoted to the rank 
of major to raise a battalion kncwn in 
history as White's Battalion, subject 
to the orders of the Secretary of War. 
After the formation of his command 
and until the end of the war he acted 
independently with General Ewell, 
General Stewart and General Lee, and 
on several battlefields was seriously 
wounded. After the war Colonel 
White engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness, and for many years was treas- 
urer and sheriff of Loudon County. 
He was twice married. In 1902 he was 
elected president of the People's Na- 
tional Bank of Leesburg, a position 
which he held up to the time of his 
death. As a minister he was faithful 
toi his churches, uncompromising with 
error and an able defender of salva- 
tion by grace. He loved to talk of 
Jesus, the Saviour of sinners, and his 
labor was a labor of love, and espec- 
ially was he gifted to speak words of 
comfort and cheer to poor, bereaved 
ones. He had a large circle of friends 
which was attested by the large con- 
course of sorrowing relatives, neigh- 
bors and comrades in arms — estimat- 



ed at a thousand or twelve hundred — 
that attended the funeral service. He 
died as he had lived, an upright, sin- 
cere and honorable man, and in the 
sweet hcpe of victory through Jesus. 




JOHN WHITE. 

White, Elder John, of Walker, Mo. 
The editor failing to secure data from 
which to prepare a more detailed 
sketch cf this worthy minister, gives 
the following information from Elder 
Cash's Book of Portraits published 
189G: "Elder John White was born in 
Kentucky, December 9, 1835, and 
united with Eagle Creek Church, 
Bcone County, Ind., in 18G0, where he 
commenced preaching and was or- 
dained in 1897. He now has the pas- 
toral care of Bethel Church, Bates 
County, Mo., and is moderator of Pan- 
ther Creek Association." 



HEDLEY WHITE. 

White, Elder Hedley, of Texas, who 
departed this life February 2G, 1909, 
was born in East Tennessee January 
5, 1833, moved with his parents to Ar- 
kansas in his eighteenth year of age, 
and about one year later moved to 
Leon County.. Texas, where, with the 
exception of a few years he spent the 
remainder of his life. In early man- 
hood Elder White received a hope in 
Jesus and united with the new school 
or Missionary Baptists and lived with 



292 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



them for about fourteen years, but 
becoming dissatisfied with their doc- 
trine and practice, and bemg convinc- 
ed that the Primitive Baptist Church 
■was the true, apostolic church in doc- 
trine and practice he united with 
them in the year of 1880, and was 
baptized by Elder Joe Taylor, and re- 
mained an honored member of that 
church until death. He began preach- 
ing in 1880, and until his death 
preached Jesus as a sufficient Saviour 
for sinners, and has been a great 
blessing to the Baptists of his 
section. He was plain and unas- 
suming in all of his dealings; went 
through cold and heat to serve his 
brethren without money and price 
strained only by the love of God 
shed abroad in his heart for his breth- 
ren and fellow travelers. His home 
has been indeed a home for his breth 
ten. "He is dead, but still speaketb." 



KING M. WHITE. 

White. Elder King M. of North Car- 
olina, the son of Calvin and Mary 
White— was born in Martin County. 
August 28. 1861, and died August 21, 
1904. In lSsij he was married to Miss 
Lindy Taylor. To this union were 
bcrn nine children. After being deep- 
ly convicted of sin and given a hope 
in Jesus he united with the church at 
Hamilton. N. C. in 1891, and was bap- 
tized by Elder M. T. Lawrence. Soon 
afterward the church discovered his 
gift and be was licensed to preach 
and in 1900 he was ordained to tbe 
ministerial work by Elders M. T. Law- 
rence. G. D. Rcbinson and Samuel 
Moore. Ever afterwards he proved 
"diligent in business, fervent in spirit, 
serving the Lord." and was an up- 
right, sincere, humble, godly and use- 
ful man. He grew more and more ac- 
ceptable in his brief but earnest min- 
istry, and it was sad to his brethren 
and loved ones to give him up almcst 
in the prime of life. But God does all 
things well. — He is too wise to err. 
too good to be unkind. 



JOHN A. WHITELEY. 

Wh.teley. Elder John A., of Avilla. 
Mo., was born in Pulaski County. Ky.. 
April 4, 1818. and was the twelfth of 
fifteen children born to Thos. and 
Winifred Whiteley, both of whom 
were honored members of the Old 
School Baptist Church, and his father 



a faitniul minister. While witnessing 
the baptism of twelve candidates by 
his father he was, in his fifteenth 
year, convicted of sin. For many years 
he was under deep conviction and 
sought the Lord in tears and sorrow, 
was given a sweet bope in the Sa- 
viour, and united with the Primitive 
Baptists at Little Flock Churcn, in 
Fulton County. 111., and was baptized 
by Elder Thos. H. Owens, and when 
he came from the water it was with 
difficulty he kept from preaching, and 
trom that time on. for ten years, he 
fcught against the impression made 
on his mind at his baptism. But in 
1858 he was ordained by Hopewell 
Church. Wayne County, Iowa, by Eld- 
ers Isaiah Guyman. John Martin and 
Samuel Wilkes, and was soon called 
to the care of four churches. During 
his long term of faithful service in the 
Master"s vineyard he has had the care 
of seveial churches and has served as 
moderator of Silvain and Western 
associations in Iowa, and Center 
Creek Association in Missouri. 



EBENEZER WICKES. 

Wickes, Elder Ebenezer (1772-1837) 
of New Baltimore, N. Y., was for 
more than thirty years a faithful and 
zealous minister of tbe Old School 
order and in the division of 1832 
could not be led off by the New School 
party. Upon his death bed he express- 
ed a full, clear and triumphant hope 
in Jesus, and exhorted his brethren 
to stand fast in the faith of the gos- 
pel and practice of the apostles. 



WILLIAM R. WIGGINTON. 

Wigginton, Elder William R. (1819- 
1908), of Missouri, was perhaps at his 
death the oldest Primitive Baptist in 
Missouri. He was, at the time of his 
death a member of Liberty Church 
situated in Linn County, Mb.; was or- 
dained by the authority of Mt. Tabor 
Church, Boone County. Mo , May, 
1848, by Elders Thos. P. Stephens, 
Peter Kempar. Franklin Jenkins and 
Benj. Wren. He was pastor of the 
First Baptist Church at Mexico, Mo., 
and for several years preached at 
many churches in Monroe. Boone, 
Adrian. Callaway and Montgomery 
counties. Mo., and during his minis- 
try baptized several hundred persons 
and officiated at nearly cne thousand 
marriages. He preached the first ser- 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



293 



mon ever heard in Centralia, speaking 
from the old North Missouri railway 
platform shortly after the railroad 
was built into the town. 




JOHN WILLEFORD. 

Willeford, Eider John, of Greenville, 
111., was born in Bond County, 111., 
March 3, 185G, and united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church called Mt. 
Nebo, in June, 1876, and was baptized 
by Elder A. J. Willeford. Since served 
this and other churches. He was 
licensed to preach in April, 1892, and 
ordained to the full work of the gos- 
pel ministry December, 1903, by Eld- 
ers J. A. Conlee, D. M. Masters, win. 
E. Wright and Samuel H. Wright. He 
was chosen pastor of his (Mt. Nebo) 
church the third of January, 1904, 
and is still serving his church in that 
capacity. Elder Willeford is a faith- 
ful and useful servant and is much 
loved by his people. 



M. B. WILLEFORD. 

Willeford, Elder M. B., of Rocky 
Mount, N. C, was born in Nash Coun- 
ty, N. C, October 20, 1844. He was re- 
garded as a good boy in his youth and 
has sustained this opinion through 
manhood's years. Before grown he en- 
tered the Southern army, served more 
than two years and was with Lee at 
Appomattox at the surrender. In 1866 
he was married to Miss Jurutha A. 
Whitley and though she had the mis- 
fortune of losing one arm in a fire 
caused by igniting and explosion of 
kerosene oil soon after thev were 



married, yet by a strong will and 
willing mind, she has been indeed a 
helpmate to her husband. To them 
have been born eleven children, six of 
whom are now living, have families, 
and are a source of honor and pleas- 
ure to their aged parents. Brother 
Williford united with the Falls 
Church in 1875, and was baptized by 
Elder P. D. Gold. He was soon chosen 
clerk, and in 1880 was ordained dea- 
con. A little later was licensed to 
preach and in 1896 was ordained to 
the ministerial work. He was in the 




M. B. WILLEFORD 

constitution of the church at Nash- 
ville and has since served this church 
as pastor. Has also served Peach 
Tree, Castalia, Sappony and other 
churches much to the satisfaction of 
his charges. Though Elder Williford 
has been a great sufferer from bodily 
disease he has manifested much love 
and zeal in the cause of God and has 
often been heard to say that he had 
rather die than not be able to preach 
Jesus. During a recent illness when 
his life was thought to be nearing its 
close he said, ''If I live it will be en- 
couraging; if I die it will be more so." 
Thus in faith does he continue to run, 
with patience, the race of life. 



P. W. WILLIARD. 

irilliard, Elder P. W., of High Point, 
N. C. is an humble, faithful and 
worthy minister. He was born in 
North Carolina in 1S4S. professed a 
hope in Jesus in 1871 in his twenty- 
third year, but did not unite with the 
church until about sixteen years later. 
During this time he passed through 



294 



PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST MINISTERS 



much sorrow, trials and conflicts of 
mind, but his best excuse for living 
out of the church was his feeling of un- 
fitness and unworthiness for member- 
ship. But God enabled him to apply, 
by faith, the fitness and worthiness of 
Christ, and he went before the church 
at Abbott's Creek in 1887, was re- 
ceived and baptized by Elder L. I. 
Bodenheimer. On the following day 
he was impressed with the words in 
bis soul, "Go preach my gospel," which 




P. W. WILLIARD 

followed him until he obeyed the heav- 
enly call. This was a great trial to 
him. He felt so unqualified, having 
but little education and of a timid dis- 
position, but he was made to feel "woe 
is me, if I preach not the gospel," was 
ordained to the gospel work and for 
twenty years has had the care of 
churches. He is satisfied with the 
goodness of God's house and wants no 
new thing in the church and is much 
loved for his faithfulness, meekness 
and kind disposition. 



J. R. WILLIS. 

Willis, Elder J. R., of Center, Miss., 
is a faithful pastor of churches with- 
in the bounds of the Bethany Associa- 
tion of Primitive Baptists. He is also 
moderate r of this association and is 
h